Tag Archives | explicit

SODOMY

In criminal law. The crime of unnatural sexual connection; so named from its prevalence in Sodom. See Genesis, xix. This term is often defined in statutes and judicial decisions as meaning “the crime against nature,” the “crimen iniwminatum,” or as carnal copulation, against the order of nature, by man with man, or, in the same unnatural manner, with woman or with a beast. See Cr. Code Ga.

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STATUTORY RAPE

the term that describes having sexual intercourse with a person who is younger than the legal age of consent.

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Synonyms

Lunacy, at the common law, was a term used to describe the state of one who, by sickness, grief, or other accident, has wholly lost his memory and understanding. Co. Litt 2406, 247a; Com. v. Haskell, 2 Brewst (Pa.) 490. It is distinguished from idiocy, an idiot being one who from his birth has had no memory or understanding, while lunacy implies the possession and subsequent loss of mental powers. Bicknell v. Spear, 38 Misc. Rep. 3S9, 77 N. T. Supp. 920. On the other hand, luuacy is a total deprivation or suspension of the or- dinary powers of the mind, and Is to be distinguished from imbecility, where there is a more or less advanced decay and feebleness of the intellectual faculties. Iu re Vanaukeu, 10 N. J. Eq. 180, 195; Odell v. Buck, 21 Wend. (N. Y.) 142. As to all other forms of insanity, lunacy was originally distinguished by the occurrence of lucid intervals, and hence might be described as a periodical or recurrent insanity. In re Anderson, 132 N. C. 243, 43 S. E. 049; Hiett v. Shull, 3(5 W. Va. 503, 15 S. E. 140. But while these distinctions are still observed in some jurisdictions, they are more generally disregarded; so that, at present, in inquisitions of lunacy and other such proceedings, the term “lunacy” has almost everywhere come to be synonymous with “insanity,” and is used as a general description of all forms of derangement or mental unsouuduess, this rule being established by statute in many states and by judicial decisions in others. In re Clark, 175 N. Y. 139, 07 N. I’i 212; Smith v. Hickenbot- tom, 57 Iowa, 733, 11 N. W. 004; Casou v. Owens, 100 Ga. 142, 28 S. E. 75; In re Ilill, 31 N. J. Eq. 203. Cases of arrested mental development would come within the definition of lunacy, that is, where the patient was born with a normal brain,,but the cessation of mental growth occurred in infancy or so near it that he never acquired auy greater intelligence or discretion than belongs to a normally healthy child. Such a subject might be scientifically denominated an “idiot,” but not legally, for in law the latter term is applicable only to congenital amentia. The term “lucid interval” means not an apparent tranquility or seeming repose, or cessation of the violent symptoms of the disorder, or a simple diminution or remission of the disease, but a temporary cure

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TARGET RISK

The prospective holders of policies that are divided by age, race, sex and other demographic factors.

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TEMPLE

Two English inns of court, thus called because anciently the dwelling place of the Knights Templar. On the suppression of the order, they were purchased by some professors of the common law, and converted into hospitia or inns of court. They are called the “Inner” and “Middle Temple,” in relation to Essex House, which was also a part of the house of the Templars, and called the “Outer Temple,” because situated without Temple Bar. Enc. Lond.

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TRANSEXUAL

a person who chnages his sex with an operation.

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TRANSVESTITE

the term given to the person who wears the clothes and poses as a person of the opposite sex.

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TRINITY SITTINGS

Sittings of the English court of appeal and of the high court of justice in London and Middlesex, commencing on the Tuesday after Whitsun week, and terminating on tlie 8th of August.

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VENEREAL DISEASE

the name that is given to an infection that is transmitted by sexual contact.

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VIR

Lat A man, especially as marking the sex. In the Latin phrases and maxims of the old English law, this word generally means “husband,” the expression i-ir et uxor corresponding to the law French baron et feme. Vir et uxor censentur in lege una persona. Jenk. Cent 27. Husband and wife are considered one person in law. Vir et uxor sunt quasi unica persona, quia caro et sanguis unus; res licet sit propria uxoris, vir tamen ejus custos, cum sit caput mulieris. Co. Litt 112. Man and wife are, as it were, one person, because only one flesh and blood; although the property may be the wife’s, the husband is keeper of it, since he is the head of the wife. Vir militans Deo non implicetur secu- laribus negotiis. Co. Litt. 70. A man fighting for God must not be involved in secular business.

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WINTER HEYNING

The season between 11th November and 23d April, which isexcepted from the liberty of commoniug iu certain forests. St. 23 Car. II. c. 3.

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WORSHIP

The act of offering honor and adoration to the Divine Being. Religiousexercises participated in by a number of persons assembled for that purpose, thedisturbance of which is a statutory offense in many states. See Hamslier v. Hamsher,132 111. 273, 22 N. E. 1123, 8 L. R. A. 556; State v. District Board, 76 Wis. 177, 44 N.W. 967, 7 L. R. A. 330, 20 Am. St. Rep. 41; State v. Buswell, 40 Neb. 158, 58 N. W.728, 24 L. R. A. 68.In English law. A title of honor or dignity used in addresses to certain magistratesand other persons of rank or office.

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YOUTH

This word may include children and youth of both sexes. Nelson v. Cushlng,2 Cush. (Mass.) 519, 528.

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