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REMOVAL OF CAUSES

The transfer of a cause from one court to another; com- monly used of the transfer of the jurisdiction and cognizance of an action commenced D but uot finally determined, with all further O proceedings therein, from one trial court to another trial court. More particularly, the transfer of a cause, before trial or final hearing thereof, from a state court to the United States circuit court, under the acts of congress in that behalf.

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RENTAL

(Said to be corrupted from “rent-roll.”) In English law. A roll on which the rents of a manor are registered or set down, and by which the lord’s bailiff collects the same. It contains the lands and tenements let to each tenant, the names of the tenants, and other particulars. Cunning- ham ; Holthouse.

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REPLEADER

When, after issue has been joined in an action, and a verdict given thereon, the pleading is found (on examination) to have miscarried and failed to effect its proper object, viz., of raising an apt and material question between the parties, the court will, on motion of the unsuccessful party, award a repleader; that is, will order the parties to plead de now for the purpose of obtaining a better issue. Brown. Judgment of repleader differs from a judgment non obstante veredicto, in this: that it is allowed by the court to do justice between the parties where the defect is in the form or manner of stating the right, and the issue joined is on an immaterial point, so that it cannot tell for whom to give judgment; while judgment non obstante is given only where it is clearly apparent to the court that the party who has succeeded has, upon his own showing, no merits, and cannot have by any manner of statement. 1 Chit. PI. 687, 688.

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REPORTS,

THE. The name given, par excellence, to Lord Coke’s Reports, from 14 Eliz. to 13 Jac. I., which are cited as “Rep.” REPOSITION OF THE FOREST 1020

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REPUBLICATION

The re-execution or re-establishment by a testator of a will which he had once revoked. A second publication of a will, either expressly or by construction.

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RESCOUS

Rescue. The taking back by force goods which had been taken under a distress, or the violently taking away a man who is under arrest, and setting him at liberty, or otherwise procuring his escape, are both so denominated. This was also the name of a writ which lay in cases of rescue. Co. Litt. 1G0; 3 Bl. Comm. 140; Fitzh. Nat. Brev. 100; 6 Mees. & W. 504.

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RESORT

trator, after paying the debts and particular legacies of the deceased, and before paying over the residuum, must pass before the board of inland revenue, Mozley & Whitley.

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RE3PECTU COMPUTI VICECOMITIS EiiBiiMJO

A writ for respiting a sher- iu’s account addressed to the treasurer and barons of the exchequer. Reg. Orig. 139.

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RESTAMPING WRIT

Passing it a second time through the proper office, whereupon it receives a new stamp. 1 Chit. Arch. Pr. 212.

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RESUMPTION

In old English law. The taking again into the king’s hands such lands or tenements as before, upon false suggestion, or other error, he had delivered to the heir, or granted by letters patent to any man. Cowell.

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RETOUR SANS PROTET

Fr. Return without protest. A request or direction by a drawer of a bill of exchange that, should the bill be dishonored by the drawee, it may be returned without protest.

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RETURNING BOARD

This is the official title in some of the states of the board of canvassers of elections.

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REVERSIO

L. Lat. In old English law. The returning of land to the donor Fleta, lib. 3, cc. 10, 12. Reversio terrse est tanquam terra re- vertens in possessione donatori, sive hseredibus suis post donum finitum. Co. Litt. 142. A reversion of land is, as it were, the return of the land to the possession of the donor or ills heirs after the termination of the estate granted.

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REVOCABLE

Susceptible of being revoked.

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RIDER-ROLL

See RIDER.

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RIGHT OF ENTRY

A right of entry is the right of taking or resuming possession of land by entering on it in a peaceable manner.

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RINGING THE CHANGE

In criminal law. A trick practised by a criminal, by which, on receiving a good piece of money in payment of an article, he pretends it is not good, and, changing it, returns to the buyer a spurious coin. See 2 Leach, 780; Bouvier.

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RISTOURNE

Fr. In insurance law; the dissolution of a policy or contract of insurance for any cause. Emerig. Traitfi des Assur. c. 16.

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ROGATOR

Lat. In Roman law. The proposer of a law or rogation.

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ROSLAND

Heathy ground, or ground full of liug; also watery aud moorish land. 1 Inst. 5.

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