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RECOURSE

The phrase “without recourse” is used in the form of making a qualified or restrictive indorsement of a bill or note. By these words the iudorser signifies that, while he transfers his property iu tlie iustrumeut, he does not assume the responsibility of an indorser. See Lyons v. Fitzpat- rick, 52 La. Ann. 097, 27 South. 111.

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RECTO SUR DISCLAIMER

An abolished writ on disclaimer.

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REDDIDIT SE

Lat. He has rendered himself. In old English practice. A term applied to a principal who had rendered himself in discharge of his bail. Holthouse.

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REDISSEISIN

In old English law. A second disseisin of a person of the same ten- ements, and by the same disseisor, by whom be was before disseised. 3 Bl. Comm. 188.

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REFECTION

In the civil law. Reparation ; re-establishment of a building. Dig. 19, 1, 6. 1.

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REFUND

To repay or restore; to return money had by one party of another. See Rackl Iff v. Greenbush, 93 Me. 99, 44 Atl. 375; Maynard v. Mechanics’ Nat. Bank, 1 Brewst. (Pa.) 484; Gutch v. Fosdick, 48 N. J. Eq. 353, 22 Atl. 590, 27 Am. St. Rep. 473.

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REGENT

A governor or ruler. One who vicariously administers the government of a kingdom, in the name of the king, during the latter’s minority or other disability. A master, governor, director, or superin tendent of a public institution, particularly a college or university. Regia dignitas est indivisibilis, et quselibet alia derivativa dignitas est similiter indivisibilis. 4 Inst. 243. The kingly power is indivisible, and every other derivative power is similarly indivisible.

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REGULU3

to real property. See Friedley v. Hamilton. 17 Serg. & R. (Pa.) 71, 17 Am. Dec. 638; Cas- tillero v. U. S

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REHABILITATION

In French and Scotch criminal law. The reinstatement of a criminal in his personal rights which he has lost by a judicial sentence. Brande. In old English law. A papal bull or brief for re-enabling a spiritual person to exercise his function, who was formerly disabled; or a restoring to a former ability. Cowell.

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RELAXATIO

In old conveyancing. A release; an Instrument by which a person re- linquishes to another his right in anything.

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RELINQUISHMENT

In practice. A forsaking, abandoning, renouncing, or giving over a right

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REMISE DE EA DETTE

In French law. The release of a debt

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REMOVAL OF CAUSES

The transfer of a cause from one court to another; com- monly used of the transfer of the jurisdiction and cognizance of an action commenced D but uot finally determined, with all further O proceedings therein, from one trial court to another trial court. More particularly, the transfer of a cause, before trial or final hearing thereof, from a state court to the United States circuit court, under the acts of congress in that behalf.

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RENTAL

(Said to be corrupted from “rent-roll.”) In English law. A roll on which the rents of a manor are registered or set down, and by which the lord’s bailiff collects the same. It contains the lands and tenements let to each tenant, the names of the tenants, and other particulars. Cunning- ham ; Holthouse.

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REPLEADER

When, after issue has been joined in an action, and a verdict given thereon, the pleading is found (on examination) to have miscarried and failed to effect its proper object, viz., of raising an apt and material question between the parties, the court will, on motion of the unsuccessful party, award a repleader; that is, will order the parties to plead de now for the purpose of obtaining a better issue. Brown. Judgment of repleader differs from a judgment non obstante veredicto, in this: that it is allowed by the court to do justice between the parties where the defect is in the form or manner of stating the right, and the issue joined is on an immaterial point, so that it cannot tell for whom to give judgment; while judgment non obstante is given only where it is clearly apparent to the court that the party who has succeeded has, upon his own showing, no merits, and cannot have by any manner of statement. 1 Chit. PI. 687, 688.

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REPORTS,

THE. The name given, par excellence, to Lord Coke’s Reports, from 14 Eliz. to 13 Jac. I., which are cited as “Rep.” REPOSITION OF THE FOREST 1020

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REPUBLICATION

The re-execution or re-establishment by a testator of a will which he had once revoked. A second publication of a will, either expressly or by construction.

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RESCOUS

Rescue. The taking back by force goods which had been taken under a distress, or the violently taking away a man who is under arrest, and setting him at liberty, or otherwise procuring his escape, are both so denominated. This was also the name of a writ which lay in cases of rescue. Co. Litt. 1G0; 3 Bl. Comm. 140; Fitzh. Nat. Brev. 100; 6 Mees. & W. 504.

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RESORT

trator, after paying the debts and particular legacies of the deceased, and before paying over the residuum, must pass before the board of inland revenue, Mozley & Whitley.

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RE3PECTU COMPUTI VICECOMITIS EiiBiiMJO

A writ for respiting a sher- iu’s account addressed to the treasurer and barons of the exchequer. Reg. Orig. 139.

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