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RACHATER L

Fr. To redeem; to repurchase, (or buy back.) Kelbam.

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RANGE

In the government survey of the United States, this term is used to de note one of the divisions of a state, and designates a row or tier of townships as they appear on the map.

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REAL ACTION

At the common law. One brought for the specific recovery of lands, tenements, or hereditaments. Steph. PI. 3; Crocker v. Black. 10 Mass. 448; Hall v. Decker, 48 Me. 250; Doe v. Waterloo Min. Co., 43 Fed. 220. Among the civilians, real actions, otherwise called “vindications,” were those in which a man demanded something that was his own. They were founded on dominion, or jus in re. The real actions of the Roman law were not, like the real actions of the common law, confined to real estate, hut they included personal, as well as real, property. Wharton. In French commercial law. Stock in a company, or shares in a corporation. In Scotch law. A suit or judicial proceeding.

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REAL-ESTATE AGENT

Any person whose business it is to sell, or offer for sale, real estate for others, or to rent houses, stores, or other buildings, or real estate, or to collect rent for others. Act July 13, 1800. c. 49: 14 St. at Large. 118. Carstens v. McReavy, 1 Wash. St. 359, 25 Pac. 471.

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REASONABLE AID

A duty claimed by the lord of Ihe fee of his tenants, holding by knight service, to marry his daughter, etc. Cowell.

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REAL ASSETS

Lands or real estate in the hands of an heir, chargeable with the pavment of the debts of the ancestor. 2 I!l. Comm. 244, 302.

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REAL CHATTELS

Such as concern, or savor of, the realty, such as leasehold estates; interests issuing out of. or annexed to, real estate; such chattel interests as devolve after the manner of realty. 2 Bl. Comm. 386.

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REGULAR CLERGY

In old English law. Monks who lived secundum regulas (according to the rules) of their respective houses or societies were so denominated, in contradistinction to the parochial clergy, who performed their ministry in the world, in seculo, and who from thence were called “secular” clergy. 1 Chit. BL. 387, note.

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