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WURTH

In Saxon law. Worthy; competent ; capable. Atheswurthe, worthy of oath;admissible or competent to be sworn. Spelman.

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WADSETTER

In Scotch law. A creditor to whom a wadset is made, corresponding to a mortgagee.

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WAKENING

In Scotch law. The revival of an action. A process by which an action that has lain over and not been insisted in for a year and a day, and thus technically said to have “fallen asleep,” is wakened, or put in motion again. 1 Forb. Inst, pt. 4, p. 170; Ersk. Prin. 4, 1, 33.

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WARD

1. Guarding; care; charge; as, the ward of a castle; so in the phrase “watch and ward.” 2. A division in the city of London committed to the special ward (guardianship) of an alderman. 3. A territorial division is adopted in most American cities by which the municipality is separated into a number of precincts or districts called “wards” for purposes of police, sanitary regulations, prevention of fires, elections, etc. 4. A corridor, room, or other division of a prison, hospital, or asylum. 5. An infant placed by authority of law under the care of a guardian. The person over whom or over whose prop WARD 1218 WARRANDICE N 0 R U erty a guardian is appointed is called his “ward.” Civ. Code Cal.

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WARRANTIA CHARTS

In old practice. Warranty of charter. A writ which lay for onewho, being enfeoffed of lands or tenements, with a clause of warranty, was afterwardsimpleaded in an assize or other action in which he could not vouch to warranty. In suchcase, it might be brought agaiust the warrantor, to compel him to assist the tenant witha good plea or defense, or else to render damages and the value of the land, ifrecovered against the tenant. Cowell; 3 Bl. Comm. 300.

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WATER N 0 U W

ant who has committed waste of the premises. There were anciently several forms ofthis writ, adapted to the particular circumstances.

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WAYS AND MEANS

In a legislativeTbody, the “committee on ways and means” is a committee appointed to inquire intoand consider the methods and sources for raising revenue, and to propose means forproviding the funds needed by the government.

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WELL, n

A well, as the term is used in a conveyance, is an artificial excavation anderection in and upon land, which necessarily, from its nature and the mode of its use,includes and comprehends the substantial occupation and beneficial enjoyment of thewhole premises on which it is situated. Johnson v. Rayner, 6 Gray (Mass.) 197;Andrews v. Carman, 13 Blatchf. 307, 1 Fed. Cas. 8G8.

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WHITEHART SILVER NWEST SAXON LAGE

Tlie laws of the West Saxons, which obtained in the counties tothe south and west of England, from Kent to Devonshire. Blackstone supposes theseto have been much the same with the laws of Alfred, being the municipal law of Qthe far most considerable part of his dominions, and particularly including Rerkshire,the seat of his peculiar residence. 1 Bl. Comm. G5.

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WHITE RENTS

In English law. Rents paid in silver, and called “white rents,” or”redditus albi,” to distinguish them from rents payable in corn, labor, provisions, etc.,called “black-rent” or “black-mail.”

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WIDOWHOOD

The state or condition of being a widow. An estate is sometimessettled upon a woman “during widowhood,” which is expressed in Latin, “durante viduitate.”

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WINDOW

An opening made in the wall of a house to admit light and air, and tofurnish a view or prospect The use of this word in law is chiefly iu connection with thedoctrine of ancient lights and other rights of adjacent owners.

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WITNESS, v

To subscribe one’s name to a deed, will, or other document, for the purposeof attesting its autheuticity, and prov-

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WOODWARDS

Officers of the forest, whose duty consists in looking after the woodand vert and venison, and preventing offenses relating to the same. Manw. 1S9.

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WOUNDING

An aggravated species of assault and battery, consisting in one persongiving another some dangerous hurt 3 Bl. Comm. 121.Wreccum marls significat ilia bona quae naufragio ad terram pelluntur. Awreck of the sea signifies those goods which are driven to shore from a shipwreck.

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WRIT OF DOWER

This Is either a writ of dower unde nihil habet, which lies for awidow, commanding the tenant to assign her dower, no part of which has yet been setoff to her; or a writ of right of dower, whereby she seeks to recover the remainder ofthe dower to which she is entitled, part having been already received from the tenant

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WRIT OF RIGHT

This was a writ which lay for one who had the right of property,against another who had the right of possession and the actual occupation. The writproperly lay only to recover corporeal hereditaments for an estate in fee-simple; butthere were other writs, said to be “in the nature of a writ of right,” available for therecovery of incorporeal hereditaments or of lands for a less estate than a fee-simple.Brown.In another sense of the term, a “writ of right” is one which is grantable as a matterof right, as opposed to a “prerogative writ,” which is issued only as a matter of grace ordiscretion.

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WYTE

In old English law. Acquittance or immunity from amercement

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WARRANT OF ARREST

A written order issued and signed by a magistrate, directed to a peace officer or some other person specially named, and commanding him to arrest the body of a person named in it, who is accused of an offense. Brown v. State, 109 Ala. 70, 20 South. 103.

TLD Example 1: Prosecutors had sufficient evidence of criminal activity to convince a judge to issue a warrant of arrest for the gang’s leader.

TLD Example 2: Police executed the warrant of arrest by taking the individual into custody.

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WHOLE BLOOD

Kinship by descent from the sn

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