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WIT AN

In Saxon law. Wise men; persons of information, especially in the laws; theking’s advisers; members of the king’s council; the optimates, or principal men of thekingdom. 1 Spence, Eq. Jur. 11, note.

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WOOD-GELD

In old English law. Money paid for the liberty of taking wood in aforest. Cowell.Immunity from such payment. Spelman.

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WORKS

This term means sometimes a mill, factory, or other establishment for performingindustrial labor of any sort, (South St. Joseph Land Co. v. Pitt 114 Mo. 135, 21S. W. 449,) and sometimes a building, structure, or erection of any kind upon land, asin the civil-law phrase “new works.”

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WRIT OF ATTACHMENT

A writ employed to enforce obedience to an order orjudgment of the court. It commands the sheriff to attach the disobedient party and tohave him before the court to answer his contempt. Smith, Act 176.

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WRIT OF PREVENTION

This name Is given to certain writs which may be issued inanticipation of suits which may arise. Co. Litt. 100.

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WRITING OBLIGATORY

The technical name by which a bond is described inpleading. Denton v. Adams, 6 Vt. 40.

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WAINAGIUM

What is necessary to the P farmer for the cultivation of his land. Bar- ring. Ob. St. 12.

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WANLASS

An ancient customary tenure of lands; i. e., to drive deer to a stand that the lord may have a shot. Blount, Ten 140.

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WARNOTH

In old English law. An ancient custom, whereby, If any tenant holding of the Castle of Dover failed in paying his rent at the day, he should forfeit double, and, for the second failure, treble, etc. Cowell.

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WARTH

In old English law. A customary payment, supposed to be the same withward-penny. Spelman; Blount.

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WATER-MARK

A mark indicating the highest point to which water rises, or thelowest point to which it sinks.

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WEHADINC

In old European law. The judicial combat or duel; the trial by battel.

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WESTMINSTER

A city immediately adjoining London, and forming a part of themetropolis; formerly the seat of the superior courts of the kingdom.

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WHIPPING

A mode of punishment, by the infliction of stripes, occasionally used inEngland and in a few of the American states.

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WHORE

A whore is a woman who practices unlawful commerce with men, particularlyone who does so for hire; a harlot; a concubine; a prostitute. Sheehey v. Cok- ley,43 Iowa, 183, 22 Am. Rep. 236.

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WILLFULLY

Intentionally. In charging certain offenses, it is required that theyshould be stated to be tvillfully doue. Archb. Crim. PI. 51, 58; Leach, 550.

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WITCHCRAFT

Under Sts. 33 Hen. VIII. c. 8, and 1 Jac. I. c. 12, the offense ofwitchcraft, or supposed intercourse with evil spirits, was punishable with death. Theseacts were uot repealed till 1736. 4 Bl. Comm. 60, 61.

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WOOD LEAVE

A license or right to cut down, remove, and use standing timber on agiven estate or tract of land. Osborne v. O’Reilly, 42 N. J. E

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WORLD

This term sometimes denotes all persons whatsoever who may have, claim,or acquire an interest in the subject-matter; as in saying that a judgment in rem binds”all the world.”

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WRIT OF CONSPIRACY

A writ which anciently lay against persons who had Bl.LAWDict.(2d Dd.)

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