Legal Articles

PECULATUS

Lat In the civil law. The offense of stealing or embezzling the public money. Hence the common English word “peculation,” but “embezzlement” is the proper legal term. 4 Bl. Comm. 121, 122.

Comments are closed

PEERESS

A woman who belongs to the nobility, which may lie either in her own right or by right of marriage.

Comments are closed

PENDENCY

Suspense; tbe state of being pendent or undecided; the state of an action, etc.. after it has been begun, and before the final disposition of it.

Comments are closed

PEON

n Mexico. A debtor held by his creditor in a qualified servitude to work out the debt; a serf. Webster. In India. A footman; a soldier; an inferior officer; a servant employed in the bus- iness of the revenue, police, or judicature.

Comments are closed

PER EXTENSUM

Lat. In old practice. At length.

Comments are closed

PER SE

Lat. By himself or itself; in itself; taken alone; inherently; in isolation; unconnected with other matters.

Comments are closed

PERCOLATE,

as used in the cases relating to the right of land-owners to use water on their premises, designates any flow- age of sub-surface water other than that of a running stream, open, visible, clearly to be traced. Mosier v. Caldwell, 7 Nev. 363.

Comments are closed

PERICULUM

Lat. In the civil law. Peril; danger; hazard; risk. Periculum rei venditoe, nondum tra- dita;, est emptoris. The risk of a tiling sold, and not yet delivered, is the purchaser’s. 2 Kent, Comm. 498, 499.

Comments are closed

PERNOR OF PROFITS

He who receives the profits of lands, etc.; he who has the actual pernancy of the profits.

Comments are closed

PERSONALITER

In old English law. Personally; in person.

Comments are closed

PERVISE, PAR VISE

In old English law. The court or yard of the king’s palace at Westminster. Also an afternoon exercise or moot for the instruction of students. Cowell; Blount.

Comments are closed

PHLEBITIS

In medical jurisprudence. An inflammation of the veins, which may originate in septicemia (bacterial blood- poisoning) or pywmia (poisoning from pus), and is capable of being transmitted to other tissues, as, the brain or the muscular tissue of the heart. In the latter case, an inflammation of the heart is produced which is called “endocarditis” and which may result fatally. See Succession of Bidwell, 52 La. Ann. 744, 27 South. 2S1.

Comments are closed

PIERAGE

The duty for maintaining piers and harbors.

Comments are closed

PINNAGE

Poundage of cattle.

Comments are closed

PLACE

An old form of the word “pleas.” Thus tho “Court of Common Fleas” was sometimes called the “Court of Common Place.

Comments are closed

PLAGUE

Pestilence; a contagious and malignant fever.

Comments are closed

PLEBANUS

In old English ecclesiastical law. A rural dean. Cowell.

Comments are closed

PLENA PROBATIO

In the civil law. A term used to signify full proof, (that is, proof by two witnesses,) in contradistinction to semi-plena probatio, which is only a pre- sumption. Cod. 4, 19, 5.

Comments are closed

PLUNDER,

The most common meaning of the term “to plunder” is to take property from persons or places by open force, and this may be in course of a lawful war, or by unlawful hostility, as in tbe case of pirates or banditti. But in another and very common meaning, though in some degree figurative, it is used to express the idea of taking property from a person or place, without just right, but not expressing the nature or quality of the wrong done. Carter v. Andrews, 10 Pick. (Mass.) 9; U. S. v. Stone (C. C.) 8 Fed. 246; U. S. v. Pitman, 27 Fed. Cas. 540

Comments are closed

POISON

In medical jurisprudence. A substance having an inherent deleterious property which renders it, when taken into the system, capable of destroying life. 2 Whart. & S. Med. Jur.

Comments are closed