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PAWN,

v. To deliver personal property to another in pledge, or as security for a debt or sum borrowed.

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PECIA

A piece or small quantity of ground. Parocli. Antiq. 240.

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P3DIS POSITIO

Lat In the civil and old English law. A putting or placing of the foot. A term used to denote the possession of lands by actual corporal entry upon them Waggoner v. Hastings, 5 l’a. 303.

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PELT-WOOL

The wool pulled off the skin or pelt of dead sheep. 8 Hen. VI. c. 22.

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PENSION

A stated allowance out o? the public treasury granted by government to an individual, or to his representatives, for his valuable services to the country, or in compensation for loss or damage sustained by him in the public service. Price v. Society for Savings, 64 Conn. 362, 30 Atl. 139, 42 Am. St. Rep. 198; Manning v. Spry, 121 Iowa, 191, 96 N. W. 873; Frisbie v. U. S

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PER CENT

An abbreviation of the Latin “per vent am,” meaning by the hundred, or so many parts in the hundred, or so many hundredths. See Blakeslee v. Mansfield. 00 111. App. 119; Code Va. 1S87,

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PER QUa: SERVITIA

Lat. A real action by which the grantee of a seigniory could compel the tenants of the grantor to attorn to himself. It was abolished by St 3 & 4 Wm. IV. c. 27, g 35.

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PERCA

A perch of land; sixteen and one-half feet. See PEIICH.

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PERFORM

To perform an obligation or contract is to execute, fulfill, or accomplish it according to its terms. Tills may consist either In action on the part of the person bound by the contract or in omission to act according to the nature of the subject-matter; but the term is usually applied to any action in discharge of a contract other than payment

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PERMIT

A license or instrument granted by the officers of excise, (or customs,) certifying that the duties on certain goods PERMIT 894 PERQUISITES have been paid, or secured, and permitting their removal from some specified place to another. Wharton. A written license or warrant, issued by a person in authority, empowering the grantee to do some act not forbidden by law, but not allowable without such authority.

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PERSONA

Lat. In the civil law. Character, in virtue of which certain rights belong to a man and certain duties are im- posed upon him. Thus one man may unite many characters, (persona;,) as, for example, the characters of father and son, of master and servant. Mackeld. Bom. Law,

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PERTINENTS

In Scotch law. Appurtenances. “Parts and pertinents” are formal words in old deeds and charters. 1 Forb. Inst pt. 2, pp. 112, 118.

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PETRA

A stone weight. Cowell.

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PICKETING,

by members of a trade union on strike, consists in posting members PICKLE 899 PIN-MONEY at all the approaches to the works struck against, for the purpose of observing and re- porting the workmen going to or coming from the works, and of using such influence as may be in their power to prevent the workmen from accepting work there. See Beck v. Railway Teamsters’ Protective Union, 118 Mich. 497, 77 N. V. 13, 42 L. It. A. 407, 74 Am. St. Rep. 421; Cumberland Glass Mfg. Co. v. Glass Bottle Blowers’ Ass’n, 59 N. J. Eq. 49, 40 Atl. 208.

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PILOTAGE AUTHORITIES

In English law. Boards of commissioners appointed and authorized for the regulation and appointment of pilots, each board having jurisdiction within a prescribed district.

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PITCHING-PENCE

In old English law. Money, commonly a penny, paid for pitching or setting down every bag of corn or pack of goods in a fair or market. Cowel

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PLACITUM NOMINATUM

The day appointed for a criminal to appear and plead and make his defense. Cowell.

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PLEADED

Alleged or averred, in form, iu a judicial proceeding. It more often refers to matter of defense, but not invariably. To say that matter in a declaration or replication is not well pleaded would not be deemed erroneous. Abbott

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PLEGIABILIS

In old English law. That may be pledged; the subject of pledge or security. Fleta, lib. 1, c. 20,

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PLOW-MONDAY

The Monday after twelfth-day.

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