Legal Articles

PLURIES

Lat Often; frequently. When an original and alias writ have been issued and proved ineffectual, a third writ, called a “pluries writ,” may frequently be issued. It is to the same effect as tbe two former, except that it contains the words, “as we have often commanded you,” (“sicut pluries prcecepimus,”) after the usual commencement, “We command you.” 3 Bl. Comm. 283; Archb. Pr. 585.

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POLITICAL

between the assured and the underwriter, but is left to be estimated in case of loss. The term is opposed to “valued policy,” in which the value of the subject insured is fixed for the purpose of the insurance, and expressed on the face of the policy. Mozley & Whitley. Riggs v. Fire Protection Ass’n, 61 S. C. 448, 39 S. E. 614; Cox v. Insurance Co., 3 Rich. Law, 331, 45 Am. Dec. 771; Insurance Co. v. Butler, 38 Ohio St. 128. But this term is also sometimes used in America to describe a policy in which an aggregate amount is expressed in the body of the policy, and the specific amounts and subjects are to be indorsed from time to time. London Assur. Corp. v. Paterson. 106 Ga. 538, 32 S. E. 650

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PONDUS

In old English law. Poundage;

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POPULAR SENSE

In reference to the construction of a statute, this term means that sense which people conversant with the subject-matter with which the statute is dealing would attribute to it. 1 Exch. Div. 2-1S.

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PORTMOTE

In old English law. A court held in ports or haven towns, and PORTORIA 915 POSSESSIO FRATRIS DE FEODO sometimes in Inland towns also. Cowell; Blount

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POSSIBILITAS

Lat Possibility; a possibility. Possihilitas post dissolutionem exccutionis nunquam rcviviscatur, a possibility will never be revived after the dissolution of its execution. 1 Rolle. 321. l’ost crceutionem status, lex non patitur possi- bilitatem, after the execution of an estate the law does not suffer a possibility. 3 Bulst. 10S.

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POST NATUS

Born afterwards. A term applied by old writers to a second or younger son. It is used in private international law to designate a person who was bori. after some historic event, (such as the American Revolution or the act of union between England and Scotland,) and whose rights or status will be governed or affected by the question of his birth before or after such event

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POSTERITY

All the descendants of a person in a direct line to the remotest gen POSTHUMOUS CHILD 920 POTENTIAL eration. Breckinridge v. Denny, 8 Bush (Ky.) 027.

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PACE

A measure of length containing two feet and a half, being the ordinary length of a step.

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PAINE FORTE ET DURE

See PEINB FORTE ET DURE.

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PANDECTS

A compilation of Roman law, consisting of selected passages from the writings of the most authoritative of the older jurists, methodically arranged, prepared by Tribonian with the assistance of sixteen associates, under a commission from the emperor Justinian. This work, which is otherwise called the “Digest,” comprises fifty books, and is one of the four great works composing the Corpus Juris Civilis. It was first published in A. D. 533.

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PARAPHERNALIA

In the civil law. The separate property of a married woman, other than that which is included in her dowry, or dos. The separate property of the wife is divided Into dotal and extradotal. Dotal prop- erty is that which the wife brings to the husband to assist him in bearing the expenses of the marriage establishment. Extradotal property, otherwise called “para phernal property,” is that which forms no part of the dowry. Civ. Code La. art. 2335. The wife’s paraphernalia shall not be subject to the debts or contracts of the hus- band, and shall consist of the apparel of herself and her children, her watch, and orna- ments suitable to her condition in life, aud all such articles of personalty as have been given to her for her own use and comfort Code Ga. 1882,

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PARENT

The lawful father or the mother of a person. Appeal of Gibson, 154 Mass. 378, 28 N. E. 290. This word is dis- tinguished from “ancestors” in including only the immediate progenitors of the person, while the latter embraces his more remote relatives iu the ascending line.

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PARK

In English law. A tract of inclosed ground privileged for keeping wild beasts of the chase, particularly deer; an inclosed chase extending only over a man’s own grounds. 2 Bl. Comm. 38. In American law. An inclosed pleas- ure-ground in or near a city, set apart for the recreation of the public. Riverside v. MacLain, 210 111. 308, 71 N. E. 40S, 66 L. R. A. 2S8, 102 Am. St. Rep. 164; People v. Green, 52 How. Prac. (N. Y.) 440; Archer v. Salinas City, 93 Cal. 43, 28 Pac. 839, 16 PARK-BOTE 874 PARRICIDIUM L. R. A. 145; Ehmen v. Gothenburg, 50 Neb. 715, 70 N. W. 237. PARK-BOTE. To be quit of inclosing a park or any part thereo

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PARSONAGE

A certain portion of lands, tithes, and offerings, established by law, for the maintenance of the minister who has the cure of souls. Tomlins. The word is more generally used for the house set apart for the residence of the minister. Mozley & Whitley. See Wells’ Estate v. Congregational Church, 03 Vt. 116, 21 Atl. 270; Everett v. First Presbyterian Church. 53 N. J. Eq. 500. 32 Atl. 747; Reeves v. Reeves, 5 Lea (Tenn.) 644.

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PARTNER

A member of a copartnership or firm ; one who has united with others to form a partnership in business. See PABT- NEKSIIIP.

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PASCUAGE

The grazing or pasturage of cattle.

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PASTUS

In feudal law. The procuration or provision which tenants were bound to make for their lords at certain times, or as often as they made a progress to their lands. It was often converted into money.

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PATRIA POTESTAS

Lat In Roman law. Paternal authority; the paternal power. This term denotes the aggregate of those peculiar powers and rights which, by the civil law of Rome, belonged to the head of a PATRIA POTESTAS 882 PAUPEllIES family in respect to his wife, children, (natural or adopted,) and any more remote de- scendants who sprang from him through males only. Anciently, it was of very extensive reach, embracing even the power of life and death, but was gradually curtailed, until finally it amounted to little more than a right in the paterfamilias to hold as his own any property or acquisitions of one under his power. Mackeld. Rom. Law,

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PATRUELIS

Lat. In the civil law. A cousin-germau by the father’s side; the son or daughter of a father’s brother. Wharton.

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