Archive | V RSS feed for this section

VACUUM PACKAGING

Method of preserving food where all air is removed.

Comments are closed

VACUUS

Lat In the civil law. Empty; void; vacant; unoccupied. Calvin.

Comments are closed

VADEET

In old English law. The king's eldest son; hence the valet or knave follows the king and queen In a pack of cards. Bar. Obs. St. 344.

Comments are closed

VADES

Lat. In the civil law. Pledges; sureties; bail; security for the appearance of a defendant or accused person in court Calvin.

Comments are closed

VADIARE DUEEEUM

L. Lat. In old English law. To wage or gage the duellum; to wage battel; to give pledges mutually for engaging in the trial by combat.

Comments are closed

VADIMONIUM

Lat In Roman law. Bail or security; the giving of ball for appearance in court; a recognizance. Calvin.

Comments are closed

VADIUM

Lat A pledge; security by pledge of property. Coggs v. Bernard, 2 I.d Raym. 913.

Comments are closed

VADUM

In old records, a ford, or wading place. Cowell. VAGABOND 1196 VALUABLE CONSIDERATION

Comments are closed

VAGABOND

One that wanders about, and lias no certain dwelling; an idle fellow. Jacob. Vagabonds are described in old English statutes as "such as wake on the night and sleep on the day, aud haunt customable taverns and ale-bouses and routs about; and no man wot from whence they came, nor whither they go." 4 Bl. Comm. 109. See Forsyth v. Forsyth, 46 N. J. Eq. 400, 19 Atl. 119; Johnson v. State, 28 Tex. App. 562, 13 S. W. 1005. Vagabundum mmcnpamm earn qui nullibi domicilium contraxit habitations. We call him a "vagabond" who has acquired nowhere a domicile of residence, rhillim. Dom. 23, note.

Comments are closed

VAGRANCY

the status given to a person who travels from place to place, does not work and loiters around with no means of support.

Comments are closed

VAGRANT

A wandering, idle person; a strolling or sturdy beggar. A general term, including, in English law, the several classes of idle and disorderly persons, rogues, and vagabonds, and incorrigible rogues. 4 Steph. Comm. 308. 309. In American law, the term is variously defined by statute but the general meaning is that of an able-bodied person having no visible means of support and who lives idly without seeking work, or who is a professional beggar, or roams about from place to place without regular employment or fixed residence; and in some states the term also includes those who have a fixed habitation and pursue a regular calling but one which is condemned by the law as immoral, such as gambling or prostitution. See In re Jordan, 90 Mich. 3, 50 N. W. 10S7; In re Aldermen and Justices of the Peace, 2 Pars. Eq. Cas. (Pa.) 404; Roberts v. State, 14 Mo. 145, 55 Am. Dec. 97. And see the statutes of the various states.

Comments are closed

VALE

In Spanish law. A promissory note. White, New Recop. b. 3, tit. 7, c. 5,

Comments are closed

VALEC, VALECT, or VADELET

In old English law. A young gentleman; also a servitor or gentleman of the chamber. Cowell.

Comments are closed

VALENCE

Positive or negative psychological value assigned by one person to another, event, job, outcome etc., based on its attractiveness to him.

Comments are closed

VALENTIA

L. Lat The value or price of anything. VALESHERIA. In old English law. The proving by the kindred of the slain, one on the father's side, and another on that of the mother, that a man was a Welshman. Wharton.

Comments are closed

VALET

was anciently a name denoting young gentlemen of rank and family, but afterwards applied to those of lower degree, and is now used for a menial servant, more particularly occupied about the person of his employer. Cab. Lawy. S00.

Comments are closed

VALID

Of binding force. A deed, will, or other instrument, which has received all the formalities required by law, is said to be valid.

Comments are closed

VALIDATE

1. General. Making something effective and legal. 2. Accounting. Confirm or attest to a financial item. 3. Decision making. Establish a decisions worth.

Comments are closed

VALIDATING STATUTE

a law that will correct, add to or alter or delete material from a previous law and makes the amended law valid.

Comments are closed

VALIDATION

1. Assessing an action to determine it is complete, correct, implemented and delivering the correct outcome.2. Assessment of the degree that an instrument will measure accurately; technique opt test used to predict value. See validity.

Comments are closed