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VITIUM SCRIPTORIS

In old English law. The fault or mistake of a writer or copyist; a clerical error. Gilb. Forum Rom. 185.

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VOIDANCE

The act of emptying; ejection from a benefice.

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VOUCHEE

In common recoveries, tlie person who is called to warrant or defend the title is called the “vouchee.” 2 Bouv. Inst, no. 2093.

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VOLUNTARY CONVEYANCE

A conveyance without valuable consideration; such as a deed or settlement in favor of a wife or children. See Gentry v. Field. 143 Mo. 399. 45 S. V. 2S6; Trumbull v. ITewitt, 62 Conn. 451. 26 Atl. 350; Martin v. White, 115 Ga. 800, 42 S. E. 279. As to fraudulent conveyances, see FRAUDULENT

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VOLUNTARY ANSWER

in the practice of the court of chancery, was an answer put in by a defendant, when the plaintiff had filed no interrogatories which required to be answered. Hunt, Eq.

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VOLUNTARY ASSIGNMENT

An assignment for the benefit of his creditors made by a debtor voluntarily ; as distinguished from a compulsory assignment which takes place by operation of law in proceedings in. bankruptcy or insolvency. Presumably it means an assignment of a debtor’s property in trust to pay his debts generally, in distinction from a transfer of property to a particular creditor in payment of his demand, or to a conveyance by way of collateral security or mortgage. Dias v. Bouchaud, 10 Paige. (N. Y.) 445.

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VICE-CHANCELLOR

In English law. A judge of the court of chancery, acting as assistant to the lord chancellor, and holding a separate court, from whose judgment an appeal lay to the chancellor. 3 Steph. Comm. 418.

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