Legal Articles

VIVA PECUNIA

Lat Cattle, which obtained this name from being received during the Saxon period as money upon most occasions, at certain regulated prices. Cowell.

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VOLENS

Lat. Willing. He is said to be willing who either expressly consents or tacitly makes no opposition. Calvin. Volenti non fit injuria. He who Consents cannot receive au injury. Broom, Max. 268, 200, 271, 395; Shelf. Mar. & Div. 449; Wing. Max. 482; 4 Term It 657. Voluit, sed non dixit. lie willed, but he did not say. He may have intended so, but he did not say so. A maxim frequently used in the construction of wills, in answer to arguments based upon the supposed intention of a testator. 2 Pow. Dev. 625; 4 Kent Comm. 538.

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VRAIC

Seaweed. It is used in great quantities by the inhabitants of Jersey and Guernsey for manure, and also for fuel by the poorer classes. VS. An abbreviation for versus, (against,) constantly used in legal proceedings, aud especially in entitling cases. Vulgaris opinio est duplex, viz., orta inter graves et discretos, quae multum veritatis habet, et opinio orta inter leves et vulgares homines absque specie veritatis. 4 Coke, 107. Common opinion is of two kinds, viz., that which arises among grave and discreet men, which has much truth in it, and that which arises among light and common men, without auy appearance of truth.

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VOLUNTARY ANSWER

in the practice of the court of chancery, was an answer put in by a defendant, when the plaintiff had filed no interrogatories which required to be answered. Hunt, Eq.

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VOLUNTARY ASSIGNMENT

An assignment for the benefit of his creditors made by a debtor voluntarily ; as distinguished from a compulsory assignment which takes place by operation of law in proceedings in. bankruptcy or insolvency. Presumably it means an assignment of a debtor’s property in trust to pay his debts generally, in distinction from a transfer of property to a particular creditor in payment of his demand, or to a conveyance by way of collateral security or mortgage. Dias v. Bouchaud, 10 Paige. (N. Y.) 445.

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VICE-CHANCELLOR

In English law. A judge of the court of chancery, acting as assistant to the lord chancellor, and holding a separate court, from whose judgment an appeal lay to the chancellor. 3 Steph. Comm. 418.

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VOLUNTARY CONVEYANCE

A conveyance without valuable consideration; such as a deed or settlement in favor of a wife or children. See Gentry v. Field. 143 Mo. 399. 45 S. V. 2S6; Trumbull v. ITewitt, 62 Conn. 451. 26 Atl. 350; Martin v. White, 115 Ga. 800, 42 S. E. 279. As to fraudulent conveyances, see FRAUDULENT

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