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JAMPNUM

Furze, or grass, or ground where furze grows; as distinguished from "arable," "pasture," or the like. Co. Litt. 5a.

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JAMUNLINGI, JAMUNDILINGI

Freemen who delivered themselves and property to the protection of a more powerful person, in order to avoid military service and other burdens. Spelman. Also a species of serfs among the Germans. Du Cauge. The same as commendati.

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JANITOR

In old English law. A door-keeper. Fleta, lib. 2, c. 24. In modern law. A janitor is understood to lie a person employed to take charge of rooms or buildings, to see that they are kept clean and in order, to lock and unlock them, aud generally to care for them. Fagau v. New York, S4 N. Y. 352.

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JAPANESE GOVERNMENT BOND (JGB)

The japanese government allows these securites for general business purposes.

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JAQUES

In old English law. Small money.

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JAVELIN-MEN

Yeomen retained by the sheriff to escort the judge of assize.

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JAVELOUR

In Scotch law. Jailer or gaoler. 1 I'ltc. Criin. Tr. pt. 1, p. 33.

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JAYWALKING

the term that applies to crossing a street in the wrong place and walking diagonally across the road.

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JEDBURGH JUSTICE

Summary justice inflicted upon a marauder or felon without a regular trial, equivalent to "lynch law." So called from a Scotch town, near the English border, where raiders and cattle lifters wore often summarily hung. Also written ".Teddart" or "Jedwood" justice.

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JEM AN

In old records. Yeoman. Cowell ; Blount

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JENSEN INDEX

A way to asses risk by comparing potential risk against a portfolios possible returns.

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JEOFAILE

I.. Fr. I have failed; I am in error. An error or oversight in pleading. Certain statutes are called "statutes of amendments and jeofailes" because, where a pleader perceives any slip in the form of his proceedings, and acknowledges the error, (jeofaile.) he is at liberty, by those statutes, to amend it. The amendment, however, is seldom made; but the benefit is attained by the court's overlooking the exception. 3 Bl. Comm. 407; 1 Saund. p. 228, no. 1. Jeofaile is when the parties to any suit in pleading have proceeded so far that they have joined issue which shall be tried or is tried by a jury or inquest, and this pleading or issue is so badly pleaded or joined that it will be error if they proceed. Then some of the said parties may, by their counsel, show it to the court, as well after verdict given and before judgment as before the jury is charged. And the counsel shall say: "This inquest ye ought not to take." And if it be after verdict, then he may say: "To judgment you ought not to go." And. because such niceties occasioned many delays in suits, divers statutes are made to redress them. Termes de la Ley.

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JEOPARDY

Danger; hazard; perilJeopardy is the danger of conviction and punishment which the defendant in a crim- inal action incurs when a valid indictment has been found, and a petit jury has been impaneled and sworn to try the case and give a verdict. State v. Nelson, 26 Ind. 308; State v. Emery. 59 Vt. 84. 7 Atl. 120; People v. Ten-ill. 132 Cal. 407, 04 Pac. S04; Mitchell v. State. 42 Ohio St. 383; Grogan v. State. 44 Ala. 9; Ex parte Glenn (C. C.) Ill Fed. 258; Alexander v. Com., 105 Pa. 9.

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JEQUITAS SEQUITUR LEGEM

Equity follows the law. Gilb. 1S6.

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JERGUER

In English law. An officer of the custom-house who oversees the waiters. Techn. Diet.

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JESSE

A large brass candlestick, usually hung in the middle of a church or choir. Cowell.

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JET

Fr. In French law. Jettison. Ord. Mar. liv. 3, tit. 8; Emerig. Traite des Assur. c. 12,

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JETAS LEGITIINA

Lawful age; the age of twenty-five. Dig. 3. 5, 27. pr.; Id. 26, 2. 32. 2; Id. 27, 7, 1, pr.

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JETJ

A Norman French term signifying "grandfather." It is also spelled "aieul" and "ayle." Kelham.

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JETSAM

A term descriptive of goods which, by the act of the owner, have been voluntarily cast overboard from a vessel, in a storm or other emergency, to lighten the ship. 1 C. B. 113. Jetsam is where goods are cast into the sea, and there sink and remain uuder wa- ter. 1 Bl. Comm. 292. Jetsam differs from "flotsam." in this: that in the latter the goods float, while in the former they sink, and remain uuder water. It differs also from "ligan."

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