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JUS HABENDI

The right to have a thing. The right to be put in actual possession of property. Lewin, Trusts, 5S5.

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JUS NATURALE

The natural law, or law of nature; law, or legal principles, supposed to be discoverable by the light of nature or abstract reasoning, or to be taught by nature to all nations and men alike; or law supposed to govern men and peoples in a state of nature, i. e., in advance of organized governments or enacted laws. This conceit originated with the philosophical jurists of Rome, and was gradually extended until the phrase came to denote a supposed basis or substratum common to all systems of positive law, and hence to be found, in greater or less purity, in the laws of all nations. And, conversely, they held that if any rule or principle of law was observed in common by all peoples with whose systems they were acquainted, it must be a part of the jus natu- rale, or derived from it. Thus the phrases “jus naturalc” and “jus gentium” came to be used interchangeably. Jus naturale est quod apud homines eandem habet potentiam. Natural right is that which has the same force among all mankind. 7 Coke, 12.

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JUS PROJICIENDI

I11 the civil law. The name of a servitude which consists in the right to build a projection, such as a balcony or gallery, from one’s house iu the open space belonging to one’s neighbor, but without resting on his house. Dig. 50, 10, 242; Id. 8, 2, 2; Mackeld. ltom. Law,

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JUS TRIUM LIBERORUM

In Roman law. A right or privilege allowed to the parent of three or more children. 2 Kent, Comm. 85; 2 Bl. Comm. 247. These privileges were an exemption from the trouble of guardianship, priority in bearing offices, and a treble proportion of corn. Adams, Bom. Ant. (Am. Ed.) 227.

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JUSTICIARII RESIDENTES

In English law. Justices or judges who usually resided in Westminister. They were so called to distinguish them from justices iu eyre. Co. Litt. 293.

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JUDICIAL DAY

A dav on which the court is actually in session. Heffner v. Heffner. 48 La. Ann. 1088, 20 South. 2S1

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JURIDICAL DAY

A day proper for the transaction of business in court; one on which the court may lawfully sit. excluding Sundays and some holidays.

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