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G

In the Law French orthography, this letter is often substituted for the English W,particularly as an initial. Thus, "gage" for "wage," "garranty" for "warranty," "gast" for"waste."

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G-8 FINANCE MINISTERS

Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States G8 summit representatives in the annual meeting.

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GABEL

An excise; a tax ou movables ; a rent, custom, or service. Co. Litt. 213.

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GABELLA

The Law Latin form of "gabcl," (q. v.)

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GABLATORES

Persons who paid gabcl. rent, or tribute. Domesday: Cowell

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GABLUM

A rent; a tax. Domesday; Du Cange. The gable-end of a house. Cowell.

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GABTJLUS DENARIORUM

Rent paid In money. Seld. Tit. Hon. 321.

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GADFLY

Rabble-rouser; derogatory name for an intentional problem-causing investor at a stockholder meeting.

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GAFFOLDGILD

The payment of custom or tribute. Scott.

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GAFFOLDLAND

Property subject to the gaffoldgild, or liable to be taxed. Scott.

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GAFOL

The same word as "gabel" or "gavel." Rent; tax ; interest of money.

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GAG ORDER

an order given by a court that restricts any information that is about a case that is pending.

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GAGE

v. In old English law. To pawn or pledge; to give as security for a payment orperformance; to wage or wager.

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GAGER DE DELIVERANCE

In old English law. When he who has distrained, being sued, has not delivered the cattle distrained,then he shall not only avow the distress, but gagcr dclivcrance, i. e., put insurety or pledge that he will deliver them. Fitzh. Nat. Brev.

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GAGER DEL LEY

Wager of law, (q. v.)

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GAIA HYPOTHESIS

Gaia is the ancient Greek goddess of the Earth. A metaphor, a concept, not a proven fact, that our Earth is an aware, self-regulating entity (giant cell?) that adjusts to changes and catastrophes in an 'intelligent' and holistic manner. The concept states that Earth tweaks the planet environment to mitigate step-wise changes and sudden impacts, involving biological and geological processes collaboratively. The UK scientist Dr. James E. Lovelock (1919) postulated this in 1968. In 1957 he invented the Electron Capture Detector to detect trace quantities of hazardous substances like chlorofluorocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls in the environment.

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GAIN

Profits; winnings; increment of value. Gray v. Darlington, 15 Wall. 65, 21L. Ed. 45; Thorn v. De Breteuil, SO App. Div. 405, 83 N. Y. Supp. 840.

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GAIN CONTINGENCY

Indication an upcoming gain, possibly caused by a favorable ruling, for a specific company that drives pending or possible development.

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GAIN ON RETIREMENT OF BONDS

Value increase posted on the balance sheet as a company moves to recapture expired bonds. Current value minus the price of the bond at the time of recall is the simple calculation for this gain. Current value is $1,000 $500 (price of bond) = $500 increase is an example.

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GAIN ON SALE OF ASSETS

Value increase posted on the balance sheet when a company profitably sells an valued asset. Selling furniture used in an office is an example.

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