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F

In old English criminal law, this letter was branded upon felons upon their beingadmitted to clergy ; as also upon those convicted of fights or frays, or falsity. Jacob;Cowell; 2 Reeve, Eng. Law, 392; 4 Reeve, Eng. Law, 4S5.

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F E N C E-M O N T H, or DEFENSE- MONTH

In old English law. A period of time,occurring in the middle of summer, during which it was unlawful to hunt deer in theforest, that being their fawning season. Probably so called because the deer were thendefended from pursuit or hunting. Manwood; Cowell.

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F O B

Iu mercantile contracts, this abbreviation means "free on board," and importsthat the seller or consignor of goods will deliver them on the car. vessel, or otherconveyance by which they are to be transported without expense to the buyer or consignee,that is, without charge for packing, crating, drayage, etc., until delivered to thecarrier. Vogt v. Shienbeck, 122 Wis. 491, 100 N. W. 820. 07 L. R. A. 750. 100 Am. St.Rep. 989; Silberman v. Clark, 90 X. Y. 523; Sheffield Furnace Co. v. IIull Coal & CokeCo., 101 Ala. 446, 14 South. 672.

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F OB

an abbreviation of free on board where the seller delivers goods at his own risk and expenses.

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F2EDER-FEOH

In old English law. The portion brought by a wife to her husband,and which reverted to a widow, in case the heir of her deceased husband refused hisconsent to her second marriage; i. e.. it reverted to her family in case she returned tothem. Wharton.

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F2ESTIN G-MEN

Approved men who were strong-armed; habentes homines or richmen, men of substance; pledges or bondsmen, who, by Saxon custom, were bound toanswer for each other's good behavior. Cowell ; Du Cange.

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FABRIC

Interlacing fibers that have surface area and the strength to give it structure. It can be woven, knitted, or braided. Refer to textile.

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FABRIC ARE

Lat. To make. Used In old English law of a lawful coining, and also ofan unlawful making or counterfeiting of coin. See 1 Salk. 342.

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FABRIC LANDS

In English law. Lands given towards the maintenance, rebuilding, orrepairing of cathedral and other churches. Cowell; Blount.

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FABRICA

In old English law. The making or coining of money.

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FABRICATE

To fabricate evidence is to arrange or manufacture circumstances orindicia, after the fact committed, with the purpose of using them as evidence, and ofdeceitfully making them appear as If accidental or undesigned; to devise falsely orcontrive by artifice with the intention to deceive. Such evidence may be wholly forgedand artificial, or it may consist in so warping and distorting real facts as to create anerroneous impression in the minds of those who observe them and then presentingsuch impression as true and genuine.

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FABRICATED EVIDENCE

This evidence that is false or altered so much that it is deceitful.

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FABRICATED FACT

This the term given to a fact that is not founded on a truth.

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FABRICATION

The process of making an item form raw materials.

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FABULA

In old European law. A contract or formal agreement; but particularly usedin the Lombardic and Vislgothic laws to denote a marriage contract or a will.

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FACE

The face of an instrument is that which is shown by the mere language employed,without any explanation, modification, or addition from extrinsic facts or evidence.Thus, if the express terms of the paper disclose a fatal legal defect, it is said tobe "void on its face."Regarded as an evidence of debt, the face of an instrument is the principal sumwhich it expresses to be due or payable, without any additions in the way of interest orcosts. Thus, the expression "the face of a judgment" means the sum for which thejudgment was rendered, excluding the interest accrued thereon. Osgood v. Bringolf, 32Iowa, 265.

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FACE

1.the head on a currency. 2. the first page of a document. 3. a shortened term for typeface.

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FACE AMOUNT

The total amount of coverage provided by an insurance contract, as stated on the face.

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FACE OF JUDGMENT

the term that is given to the amount of money that is granted by a judgement without any interest.

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FACE TO FACE COMMUNICATION

Communicating in real time done by sellers and receivers.

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