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VINCULO MATRIMONII

See A VINCULO MATRIMONII; DIVORCE.

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VIRES

Lat (The plural of “vis.”) Powers ; forces; capabilities: natural powers; powers granted or limited. See ULTRA VIRES. Vires acquirit enndo. It gains strength by continuance. Mann v. Mann’s Ex’rs, 1 Johns. Ch. (N. T.) 231, 237.

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VISIT

In international law. The right of visit or visitation is the right of a cruiser or war-ship to stop a vessel sailing under another flag on the high seas, and send an officer to such vessel to ascertain whether her nationality is what it purports to be. It is exercisable only when suspicious circumstances attend the vessel to be visited; as when she is suspected of a piratical character.

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VIVARIUM

Lat In the civil law. An inclosed place, where live wild animals are kept Calvin; Spelman.

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VOLUMUS

Lat. We will; it is our will. The first word of a clause in the royal writs of protection and letters patent. Cowell.

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VULGO CONCEPTI

Lat In the civil law. Spurious children; bastards.

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VACATE

To annul; to cancel or rescind ; to render an act void; as, to vacate an entry of record, or a judgment

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VAGRANT

A wandering, idle person; a strolling or sturdy beggar. A general term, including, in English law, the several classes of idle and disorderly persons, rogues, and vagabonds, and incorrigible rogues. 4 Steph. Comm. 308. 309. In American law, the term is variously defined by statute but the general meaning is that of an able-bodied person having no visible means of support and who lives idly without seeking work, or who is a professional beggar, or roams about from place to place without regular employment or fixed residence; and in some states the term also includes those who have a fixed habitation and pursue a regular calling but one which is condemned by the law as immoral, such as gambling or prostitution. See In re Jordan, 90 Mich. 3, 50 N. W. 10S7; In re Aldermen and Justices of the Peace, 2 Pars. Eq. Cas. (Pa.) 404; Roberts v. State, 14 Mo. 145, 55 Am. Dec. 97. And see the statutes of the various states.

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VANTARIUS

L. Lat In old records. A fore-footman. Spelman; CowelL

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VECTIGAL JUDICIARIUM

Lat Fines paid to the crown to defray the expenses of maintaining courts of justice.’ 3 Salk. 33. Vectigal, origine ipsa, jns Cresarnm et rcgum patrimoniale est. Dav. 12. Tribute, in its origin, is the patrimonial right of emperors and kings.

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VENDEE

A purchaser or buyer; one to whom anything is sold. Generally used of the transferee of real property, oue who acquires chattels by sale being called a “buyer.” Vendens eandem rem duobus falsarius est. He is fraudulent who sells the same thing twice. Jenk. Cent. 107.

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VENIT ET DICIT

Lat. In old pleading. Comes and says. 2 Salk. 544.

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VERIFICATION

In pleading. A certain formula with which all pleadings containing new affirmative matter must conclude, being in itself an averment that the party pleading is ready to establish the truth of what he has set forth. In practice. The examination of a writing for the purpose of ascertaining its truth; or a certificate or affidavit that it is true. “Verification-’ is not identical with “authentication.” A notary may verify a mortgagee’s written statement of the actual amount of his claim, but need not authenticate the act by his seal. Ashley v. Wright, 19 Ohio St. 291. Confirmation of the correctness, truth, or authenticity of a pleading, account, or other paper, by an affidavit, oath, or deposition. See McDonald v. Rosengarten, 134 111. 126, 25 N. E. 429; Summerfield v. Phoenix Assur. Co. (C. C-) 65 Fed. 296; Patterson v. Brooklyn, 6 App. Div. 127, 40 N. Y. Supp. 581.

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VESTURA TERR

In old English law. The vesture of the land; that is, the corn, grass, underwood, sweepage, and the like. Co. Litt 46. See Simpson v. Coe, 4 N. H. 301.

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VIA

Lat In the civil law. Way; a road; a right of way. The right of walking, riding, and driving over another’s land. Inst. 2, 3, pr. A species of rural servitude, which included iter (a footpath) and actus, (a driftway.) In old English law. A way; a public road; a foot, horse, and cart way. Co. Litt. 50o.

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VICIS ET VENELLIS MUNDANDIS

Au ancient writ against the mayor or bailiff of a town, etc., for the clean keeping of their streets and lanes. Reg. Orig. 207.

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VIGILANCE

Watchfulness; precaution ; a proper degree of activity and promptness in pursuing one’s rights or guarding them from Infraction, or in making or discovering opportunities for the enforcement of one’s lawful claims and demands. It Is the opposite of laches. Vigilantibus et non dormientibns jnra snbveninnt. The laws aid those who are vigilant not those who sleep upon their rights. 2 Inst. 690; Merchants’ Bank of Newburyport, President, etc., of, v. Stevenson, 7 Allen (Mass.) 493; Broom, Max. 892.

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VINCULUM JURIS

Lat. In tbe Roman law, au obligation is defined as a vinculum juris, i. e., “a bond of law,” whereby one party becomes or is bound to another to do something according to law.

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VIRGA

In old English law. A rod or staff; a rod or ensign of office. Cowell. VIR6A TERR.

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VISITATION

Inspection; superintendence ; direction; regulation. A power given by law to the founders of all eleemosy VISITATION BOOKS 1211 VOCABULA ARTI9 nary corporations. 2 Kent, Comm. 300-303; 1 Bl. Comm. 480, 481. In England, the vis- itation of ecclesiastical corporations belongs to the ordinary. Id. See Trustees of Union Baptist Ass’n v. Hunn, 7 Tex. Civ. App. 249, 20 S. W. 755; Allen v. McKean, 1 Fed. Cas. 498.

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