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VIGILANCE

Watchfulness; precaution ; a proper degree of activity and promptness in pursuing one’s rights or guarding them from Infraction, or in making or discovering opportunities for the enforcement of one’s lawful claims and demands. It Is the opposite of laches. Vigilantibus et non dormientibns jnra snbveninnt. The laws aid those who are vigilant not those who sleep upon their rights. 2 Inst. 690; Merchants’ Bank of Newburyport, President, etc., of, v. Stevenson, 7 Allen (Mass.) 493; Broom, Max. 892.

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VINCULUM JURIS

Lat. In tbe Roman law, au obligation is defined as a vinculum juris, i. e., “a bond of law,” whereby one party becomes or is bound to another to do something according to law.

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VIRGA

In old English law. A rod or staff; a rod or ensign of office. Cowell. VIR6A TERR.

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VISITATION

Inspection; superintendence ; direction; regulation. A power given by law to the founders of all eleemosy VISITATION BOOKS 1211 VOCABULA ARTI9 nary corporations. 2 Kent, Comm. 300-303; 1 Bl. Comm. 480, 481. In England, the vis- itation of ecclesiastical corporations belongs to the ordinary. Id. See Trustees of Union Baptist Ass’n v. Hunn, 7 Tex. Civ. App. 249, 20 S. W. 755; Allen v. McKean, 1 Fed. Cas. 498.

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VIVARY

In English law. A place for keeping wild animals alive, including fishes; a fish pond, park, or warren.

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VOLUNTARIUS DjEMON

A voluntary madman. A term applied by Lord Coke to a drunkard, who has voluntarily contracted madness by intoxication. Co. Litt 247; 4 Bl. Comm. 25.

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VULGO QUiESITI

Lat. In the civil law. Spurious children; literally, gotten from the people; the offspring of promiscuous cohabitation, who are considered as having no father. Inst. 3, 4, 3; Id. 3, 5, 4. > > I w. 1215 WAIN-BOTE w W. As an abbreviation, this letter frequently stands for “William,” (king of England,) “Westminster,” “west,” or “western.” W. D. An abbreviation for “Western District”

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VACATIO

Lat In the civil law. Exemption ; immunity; privilege; dispensation; exemption from the burden of office. Calvin.

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VALE

In Spanish law. A promissory note. White, New Recop. b. 3, tit. 7, c. 5,

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VARA

A Spanish-American measure of length, equal to 33 English inches or a trifle more or less, varying according to local usage. See U. S. v. Perot 98 U. S. 428, 25 L Ed. 251.

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VECTIGALIA

In Roman law. Customs-duties ; taxes paid upon the importation or exportation of certain kinds of merchandise. Cod. 4, 61.

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VENDIBLE

Fit or suitable to be sold; capable of transfer by sale; merchautable.

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VENTE

In French law. Sale; contract of sale.

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VERIFY

To confirm or substantiate by oath ; to show to be true. Particularly used of making formal oath to accouuts, petitions, pleadings, and other papers. The word “verify” sometimes means to confirm and substantiate by oath, and some- times by argument. When used in legal proceedings it is generally employed In the former sense. De Witt v. Hosmer, 3 IIow. Prac. (N. Y.) 284. Veritas, a qnocnnque dicitnr, a Deo est. 4 Inst. 153. Truth, by whomsoever pronounced, is from God. Veritas demonstrationis tollit errorem nominis. The truth of the description removes an error in the name. 1 Ld. Raym. 303. Veritas habenda est in jnratore; justitia et judicium in judice. Truth is the desideratum in a juror; justice and judgment in a judge. Bract, fol. 1856. Veritas nihil veretnr nisi abscond!. Truth fears nothing but to be hid. 9 Coke, 206. Veritas nimium altercando amittitur. Truth is lost by excessive altercation. Hob. 344. Veritas, quae minime defensatur op- primitnr; et qui non improbat, appro- bat. 3 Inst. 27. Truth which is not sufficiently defended is overpowered; and he who does not disapprove, approves. Veritatem qui non llbere pronunciat proditor est veritatis. 4 Tnst. Rpil. He who does not freely spe&k the truth is a betrayer of truth.

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VESTURE

In old English law. Profit of land. “How much the vesture of an acre is worth.” Oowell.

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VIABILITY

VIABILITY. Capability of living. A term used to denote the power a new-born child possesses of continuing its independent existence.

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VICOUNTIEL, or VICONTIEL

Anything that belongs to the sheriffs, as vicontiel writs; i. e., such as are triable iu the sheriffs court As to vicontiel rents, see St. 3 & 4 Wm. IV. c. 99,

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VIGOR

Lat. Strength; virtue; force; efficiency. Proprio vigore, by its own force. VIIS ET MODIS1208 VINDEX

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VINDEX

Lat. In the civil law. A defender. VINDICARE 1209 VIRGA

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VIRGA TEBBX, (or VIRGATA TER-

In old English law. A yard-land; a measure of land of variable quantity, containing in some places twenty, in others twenty-four, In others thirty, and in others forty, acres. Cowell; Co. Litt 5u.

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