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VOIDANCE

The act of emptying; ejection from a benefice.

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VOUCHEE

In common recoveries, tlie person who is called to warrant or defend the title is called the “vouchee.” 2 Bouv. Inst, no. 2093.

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VADIARE DUEEEUM

L. Lat. In old English law. To wage or gage the duellum; to wage battel; to give pledges mutually for engaging in the trial by combat.

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VALUATION

The act of ascertainiug the worth of a thing. The estimated worth of a thing. See Lowenstein v. Schiller, 38 App. Div. 178, 50 N. Y. Supp. 074; State v. Central Pac. It. Co., 7 Nev. 104; Sergeant v. Dwyer, 44 Minn. 300, 40 N. W. 444.

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VASTUM

L Lat A waste or common lying open to the cattle of all tenants who have a right of commoning. Cowell.

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VELTRARIA

The office of dog-leader, or courser. Cowell.

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VENDUE MASTER

An auctioneer.

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VEREBOT

Sax. In old records. A packet-boat or transport vessel. Cowell.

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VESTA

The crop on the ground. Cowell.

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VEXATION

The injury or damage which is suffered in consequence of the tricks of another.

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VICE-COMES NON MISIT BREVE

The sheriff hath not sent the writ. The form of continuance on the record after issue and before trial. 7 Mod. 349; 11 Mod. 231.

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VIE

Fr. Life; occurring in the phrases cestui que vie, pur autre vie, etc.

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VILLENOUS JUDGMENT

A judgment which deprived one of his libera lex, whereby he was discredited and disabled as a juror or witness; forfeited his goods and chattels and lands for life; wasted the lands, razed the houses, rooted up the trees, and committed his body to prison. It has become obsolete. 4 Bl. Comm. 136; 4 Steph. Comm. 230 ; 4 Broom & H. Comm. 153. Wharton. Vim vi repcllcre licet, modo fiat mode- ramine inculpatse tutelse, non ad sumen- dam vindictam, sed ad propulsandam in- juriam. It is lawful to repel force by force, provided it be done with the moderation of blameless defense, not for the purpose of taking revenge, but to ward off injury. Co. Litt. 162a.

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VIOLENCE

The term “violence” is synonymous with “physical force,” and the two are used interchangeably, iu relation to assaults, by elementary writers on criminal law. State v. Wells, 31 Conn. 212.

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VIS

Lat Any kind of force, violence, or disturbance relating to a man’s person or his property.

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VITRICUS

Lat In the civil law. A step-father; a mother’s second husband. Calvin.

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VOIR DIRE

L. Fr. To speak the truth. This phrase denotes the preliminary examination which the court may make of one presented as a witness or juror, where his competency, interest, etc., is objected to.

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VOUCHER TO WARRANTY

The Gallic ing one who has warranted lands, by the par- n ty warranted, to come and defend the suit for him. Co. Litt. 1016. Vox emissa volat; lit era scripta ma- net. The spoken word flies; the written letter remains. Broom, Max. 606.

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VADIMONIUM

Lat In Roman law. Bail or security; the giving of ball for appearance in court; a recognizance. Calvin.

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VALUATION LIST

In English law. A list of all the ratable hereditaments in a parish, showing the names of the occupier, the owner, the property, the extent of the property, the gross estimated rental, and the ratable value; prepared by the overseers of each parish in a union under section 14 of tlie union assessment committee act, 1802, (St. 25 & 20 Vict c. 103,) for the purposes of the poor rate. Wharton.

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