Legal Articles

KENNING TO A TERCE

In Scotch law. The act of the sheriff in ascertaining the just proportion of the husband’s lauds which belong to the widow in right of her terce or dower. Bell.

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KILDERKIN

A measure of eighteen gallons.

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KINTAL, or KINTLE

A hundred pounds in weight. See QUINTAL.

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KNOW ALL MEN

In conveyancing. A form of public address, of great antiquity, and with which many written instruments, such as bonds, letters of attorney, etc., still commence.

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KALALCONNA

A duty paid by shopkeepers in Hiudostan, who retail spirituous liquors; also the place where spirituous liquors are sold. Wharton.

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KENTLAGE

In maritime law. A permanent ballast, consisting usually of pigs of iron, cast in a particular form, or other weighty material, which, on account of its superior cleanliness, and the small space occupied by it, is frequently preferred to ordinary ballast Abb. Shipp. 5.

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KILKETH

An ancient servile payment made by tenants in husbandry. Cowell.KILL, v. To deprive of life; to destroy the life of an animal. The word “homicide” expresses the killing of a human being. See The Ocean Spray, 18 Fed. Cas. 559; Carroll v. White, 33 Barb. (N. Y.) 620; Porter v. Hughey, 2 Bibb (Ky.) 232; Com. v. Clarke, 162 Mass. 495, 39 N. E. 280. KILL, n. A Dutch word, signifying a channel or bed of the river, and hence the river or stream itself. It is found used in this sense in descriptions of land in old conveyances. French v. Carhart, 1 N. Y. 96.

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KINTLIDGE

A ship’s ballast. See KENTLAGE

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KNOWINGLY

With knowledge; consciously; intelligently. The use of this word in an indictment is equivalent to an averment that the defendant knew what he was about to do, and, with such knowledge, proceeded to do the act charged. U. S. v. Claypool (D. C.) 14 Fed. 128.

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KALENDS

In English ecclesiastical law. Rural chapters, or conventions of the rural deans and parochial clergy, which were formerly held on the calends of every month; hence the name. Paroch. Antiq. 604.

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KENTREF

The division of a county; a hundred in Wales. See CANTBED.

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KIN

Relation or relationship by blood or consanguinity. “The nearness of kin is com- puted according to the civil law.” 2 Kent, Comm. 413. See Keniston v. Mayhew, 169 Mass. 160, 47 N. E. 612; Hibbard v. Odell, 16 Wis. 635; Lusby v. Cobb, 80 Miss. 715, 32 South. 6. As to “next of kin,” see NEXT.

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KIPPER-TIME

In old English law. The space of time between the 3d of May and the Epiphany, in which fishing for salmon in the Thames, between Gravesend and Henley- on-Tliames, was forbidden. Rot. Pari. 50 Edw. III.

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KNOWLEDGE

The difference between “knowledge” and “belief” is nothing more than in the degree of certainty. With regard to things which make not a very deep impression on the memory, it may be called “belief.” “Knowledge” is nothing more than a man’s firm belief. The difference is ordinarily merely in the degree, to be judged of by the court, when addressed to the court; by the jury, when addressed to the KNOWLEDGE 690 KYTH jury. Hatch v. Carpenter, 9 Gray (Mass.) 271. See Utley v. Hill, 155 Mo. 232, 55 S. W. 1091, 49 L. R. A. 323, 78 Am. St. Rep. 509; Ohio Valley Coffin Co. v. Goble, 28 Ind. App. 302. 02 N. E. 1025; Clarke v. Ingram, 107 Ga. 505, 33 S. E. 802. Knowledge may be classified in a legal sense, as positive and imputed.

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KAIENDAR

An account of time, exhibiting the days of the week and month, the seasons, etc. More commonly spelled “calendar.”

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KENTUCKY RESOLUTIONS

A series of resolutions drawn up by Jefferson, and adopted by the legislature of Kentucky in 1799, protesting against the “alien and sedi- tion laws,” declaring their illegality, announcing the strict constructionist theory of the federal government, and declaring “nullification” to be “the rightful remedy.”

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KIND

Genus; generic class; description. See IN KIND.

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KIRBY’S QUEST

In English law. An aucieut record remaining with the remembrancer of the exchequer, being an inquisition or survey of all the lands iu England, taken in the reign of Edward I. by John de Kirby, his treasurer. Blount; Cowell.

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KNOWN-MEN

A title formerly given to the Lollards. Cowell.

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KALENDARIUM

In the civil law. A calendar; a book of accounts, memorandum- book, or debt-book; a book in which accounts were kept of moneys loaned out on interest. Dig. 32, 04. So called because the Romans used to let out their money and receive the Interest on the calends of each month. Calvin.

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