Legal Articles

JUICIO

In Spanish law. A trial or suit. White, New Recop. b. 3, tit 4, c. 1.

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JURATION

The act of swearing; the administration of an oath. Jurato creditur in judieio. He who makes oath is to be believed in judgment. 3 Inst. 79.

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JURIST

One who is versed or skilled in law; answering to the Latin “jurisper- itus,” (q. v.) One who is skilled in the civil law, or law of nations. The term is now usually applied to those who have distinguished themselves by their writings on legal subjects.

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JUS ANGLORUM

The laws and customs of the West Saxons, in the time of the Heptarchy, by which the people were for a long time governed, and which were prefer- red before all others. Wharton.

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JUS DICERE

To declare the law; to say what the law is. The province of a court or judge. 2 Eden, 29; 3 P. Wins. 485.

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JUS HAURIENDI

In the civil and old English law. The right of drawing water. Fleta, lib. 4, c. 27,

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JUS NECIS

In Roman law. The right of death, or of putting to death. A right which a father anciently had over his children. Jus non habenti tute non paretur. One who has no right cannot be safely obeyed. Hob. 146. Jus non patitur ut idem bis solvatur. Law does not suffer that the same thing be twice paid.

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JUS PROTEGENDI

In the civil law, The name of a servitude. It is a right by which a part of the roof or tiling of one house is made to extend over the adjoining house. Dig. 50, 10, 242, 1; Id. 8, 2, 25; Id. 8, 5, 8, 5.

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JUSJURANDUM

Lat. An oath.Jusjurandum inter alios factum neo noccre nec prodesse debet. An oath made between others ought neither to hurt nor profit. 4 Inst. 279.

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JUSTICIARY COURT

The chief criminal court of Scotland, consisting of five lords of session, added to the justice general and justice clerk; of whom the justice general, and, in his absence, the justice clerk, is president. This court has a jurisdiction over all crimes, and over the whole of Scotland. Bell. JUSTICIATUS 684 JUZGADO

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JACET IN ORE

Lat. In old English law. It lies in the mouth. Fleta, lib. 5, c. 5,

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JANITOR

In old English law. A door-keeper. Fleta, lib. 2, c. 24. In modern law. A janitor is understood to lie a person employed to take charge of rooms or buildings, to see that they are kept clean and in order, to lock and unlock them, aud generally to care for them. Fagau v. New York, S4 N. Y. 352.

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JOBBER

One who buys and sells goods for others; one who buys or sells on the stock exchange; a dealer in stocks, shares, or securities.

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JOURNEY-HOPPERS

In English law. Regrators of yarn. 8 Hen. VI. c. 5.

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JUDICATURE

1. The state or profession of those officers who are employed in administering justice; the judiciary. 2. A judicatory, tribunal, or court of justice. 3. Jurisdiction; the right of judicial action ; the scope or extent of jurisdiction.

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JUMENT

In old Scotch law. An ox used for tillage. 1 Pitc. Crlm. Tr. pt 2, p. 89.

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JURATOR

A juror; a compurgator, {

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JURISTIC

Pertaining or belonging to, or characteristic of, jurisprudence, or a Jurist, or the legal profession.

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JUS AQU3IDUCTUS

In the civil law. The name of a servitude which gives to the owner of land the right to bring down water through or from the land of another.

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JUS DISPONENDI

The right of disposing. An expression used either generally to signify the right of alienation, as when we speak of depriving a married woman of the jus disponendi over her separate estate, or specially in the law relating to sales of goods, where it is often a question whether the vendor of goods has the intention of re- serving to himself the jus disponendi; i. e., of preventing the ownership from passing to the purchaser, notwithstanding that he (the veudor) has parted witli the possession of the goods. Sweet.

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