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GE WINED

A. In Saxon law. The ancient convention of the people to decide a cause.

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GIVER

A donor; he who makes a gift.

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GLOSS

An interpretation, consisting of one or more words, interlinear or marginal;an annotation, explanation, or comment on any passage in the text of a work, for purposesof elucidation or amplification. Particularly applied to the comments on the CorpusJuris.

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GOEIARDUS

L. Lat. A jester, buffoon, or juggler. Spelman, voc. “Goliar- densis.”

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GRADUS PARENTELJE

A pedigree; a table of relationship.

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GRANDMOTHER

The mother of either of one’s parents.

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GRAVAMEN

The burden or gist of a charge; the grievance or injury specially complained of.In English ecclesiastical law. A grievance complained of by the clergy before thebishops in convocation.

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GREGORIAN CODE

The code or collection of constitutions made by the Roman jurist Gregorius. See CODEX GREGORIANUS.

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GROSSE AVANTURE

Fr. In French marine law. The contract of bottomry. Ord. Mar. liv. 3, tit 5.

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GUARDIANSHIP

The office, duty, or authority of a guardian. Also the relationsubsisting between guardian and ward.

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GUILTY

Having committed a crime or tort: the word used by a prisoner in pleadingto an. indictment when he confesses the crime of which he is charged, and by the juryin convicting. Com. v. Walter, 83 Pa. .108, 24 Am. Rep. 154; Jessie v. State, 2S Miss.103; State v. White, 25 Wis. 359.

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GAGE

v. In old English law. To pawn or pledge; to give as security for a payment orperformance; to wage or wager.

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GAMBLE

To game or play at a game for money. Buckley v. O’NIel, 113 Mass. 193,18 Am. Rep. 406. The word “gamble” is perhaps the most apt and substantial to convey the idea of unlawful play that our language affords. It is inclusive of hazarding and betting as well as playing. Bennett v. State, 2 Yerg. (Tenn.) 474.

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GARCIO STOLiE

Groom of the stole.

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GASTINE

L. Fr. Waste or uncultivated grouud. Britt. c. 57.

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GENEATH

In Saxon law. A villeiu, or agricultural tenant, (villunus villicus;) a hind orfarmer, (firmarius rusticus.) Spelman.

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GENUINE

As applied to notes, bonds, and other written instruments, this termmeans that they are truly what they purport to be, and that they are not false, forged,fictitious, simulated, spurious, or counterfeit. Baldwin v. Van Deusen, 37 N. Y. 492;Smelt- zer v. White, 92 U. S. 392, 23 L. Ed. 508; Dow v. Spenny, 29 Mo. 390; Cox v.Northwestern Stage Co., 1 Idaho, 379.

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GIEBET

A gallows; the post on which malefactors are hanged, or on which theirbodies are exposed. It differs from a common gallows, in that it consists of one perpendicularpost, from the top of which proceeds one arm, except it be a double gibbet,which is formed in the shape of the Roman capital T. Enc. Loud.

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GIVING IN PAYMENT

In Louisiana law. A phrase (translating the Fr. “dation enpagement”) which signifies the delivery and acceptance of real or personal property insatisfaction of a debt, instead of a payment in money. See Civil Code La. art. 2055.

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GLOSSA

Lat. A gloss, explanation, or interpretation. The glossce of the Roman laware brief illustrative comments or annotations on the text of Justinian’s collections,made by the professors who taught or lectured on them about the twelfth century,(especially at the law school of Bologna,) and were hence called “glossators.” Theseglosses were at first inserted in the text with the words to which they referred, andwere called “glosscB intcrlineares;” but afterwards they were placed in the margin,partly at the side, and partly under the text, and called “glossce marginales.” Aselection of them was made by Accursius, between A. D. 1220 and 12G0, under the titleof “Olossa Ordin- aria,” which is of the greatest authority. Mackeld. Rom. Law,

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