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GOODS

In contracts. The term “goods” is not so wide as “chattels,” for it applies to inanimate objects, and does not Include animals or chattels real, as a lease for years of house or land, which “chattels” does include. Co. Litt. 118; St. Joseph Hydraulic Co. v.Wilson, 133 Ind. 405, 33 N. E. 113;Van Patten v. Leonard, 55 Iowa, 520, S N. W. 334; Putnam v. Westcott, 19 Johns. (N.Y.) 7G.In wills. In wills “goods” is nomen generalissimo, and, if there is nothing to limit it, will comprehend all the personal estate of the testator, as stocks, bonds, notes,money, plate, furniture, etc. Kendall v. Kendall, 4 Russ. 370; Chamberlain v. Western Transp. Co., 44 N. Y. 310, 4 Am. Rep. 081 ; Foxall v. McKenney, 9 Fed. Cas. 045; Raileyv. Duncan, 2 T. I!. Mon. (Ky.) 22; Keyser v. School Dist., 35 N. II. 483.

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GRAIN

In Troy weight, the twenty- fourth part of a pennyweight Any kind of cornsown in the ground.

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GRANTEE

The person to whom a grant is made.

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GRAY’S INN

An inn of court. See INNS OF COURT.

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GRESSUME

In English law. A customary fine due from a copyhold tenant onthe death of the lord. 1 Strange, 654; 1 Crabb, Real Prop. p. 615,

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GROUNDAGE

A custom or tribute paid for tbe standing of shipping in port. Jacob.

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GUERILLA PARTY

In military law. An independent body of marauders or armedmen, not regularly or organically connected with the armies of either belligerent, whocarry on a species of irregular war, chiefly by depredation and massacre.

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GUTI

Jutes; one of the three nations who migrated from Germany to Britain at auearly period. According to Spelman, they established themselves chiefly in Kent and the Isle of Wight.

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GROSS EARNINGS AND NET EARNINGS

The gross earnings of a business or company are the total receipts before deducting expenditures. Net earnings are the excess of the gross earnings over the expenditures defrayed in producing them, and aside from and exclusive of capital laid out in constructing and equipping the works or plant. State v. Railroad Co., 30 Minn. 311. 15N. W. 307; People v. Roberts, 32 App. Div. 113, 52 N. Y. Supp. 859; Cincinnati, S. & C.It. R. Co. v. Indiana. B. & N. Ity. Co., 44 Ohio St. 287, 7 N. E. 139; Mobile & O. R. Co.v. Tennessee. 153 U. S. 480. 14 Sup. Ct. 90S. 38 L. Ed. 703; Union Pac. R. Co. v. U. S.,99 U. S. 420, 25 L. Ed. 274; Cotting v. Railway Co., 54 Conn. 150, 5 Atl. 851.

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GENERAL ELECTION

(1) One at which the officers to be elected are such as belong to the general government,

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GREAT DILIGENCE

Such a measure of care, prudence, and assiduity as persons of unusual prudence and discretion exercise in regard to anyand all of their own affairs, or such as persons of ordinary prudence exercise in regardto very important affairs of their own. Railway Co. v. Rollins. 5 Kan. 180; Litchfield v.White, 7 N. y. 438. 57 Am. Dec. 534: Rev. Codes N. Dak. 1S99,

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GRAND DISTRESS

writ of. A writ formerly issued in the real action of quare impcdit, when noappearance had been entered after the attachment; it commanded the sheriff todistrain the defendant’s lands and chattels in order to compel appearance. It is nolonger used. 23 & 24 Vict. c. 126, 5 20. having abolished the action of quare impcdit.and substituted for it the procedure in an ordinary action. Wharton.

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GENERAL ASSIGNMENT

An assignment made for the benefit of all the assignor’s creditors, instead of a few only; or one which transfers the whole of his estate to the assignee, instead of a part only. Royer Wheel Co. v. Fielding, 101 N. Y. 504. 5 N. E. 431; Halsey v. Connell, 111 Ala. 221, 20 South. 445; Mussey v. Noyes, 26 Vt. 471.

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GRAND ASSIZE

A peculiar species of trial by jury, introduced in the time of Heniy II., giving the tenant or defendant in a writ of right the alternative of a trial by battel, or by his peers. Abolished by 3 & 4 Wm. IV. c. 42,

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GROSS AVERAGE

In maritime law. A contribution made by the owners of a ship, its cargo, and the freight, towards the loss sustained by the voluntary and necessary sacrifice of property for the common safety, in proportion to their respective interests. More commonly called “general average,” (5. v.) See 3 Kent, Comm. 232; 2 Steph. Comm. 179. Wilson v. Cross, 33 Cal. 09.

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GRATUITOUS BAILMENT

Another name for a depositum or naked bailment, which is made only for the benefit of the bailor and is not a source of profit to the bailee. Foster v. Essex Bank, 17 Mass. 499, 9 Am. Dec. 108.

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GRAND BILL OF SALE

In English law. The name of an instrument used for the transfer of a ship while she is at sea. An expression which is understood to refer to the instrument whereby a ship was originally transferred from the builder to the owner, or first purchaser. 3 Kent, Comm. 133. 9. In the law of negotiable Instruments. A promissory obligation for the payment of money. Standing alone or without qualifying words, the term is understood to mean a bank note, United States treasury note, or other piece of paper circulating as money. Green v. State, 28 Tex. App. 493, 13 S. VV. 785; Keith v. Jones, 9 Johns. (N. Y.) 121; Jones v. Fales, 4 Mass. 252.

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GRAND CAPE

A judicial writ in the old real actions, which issued for the demandant where the tenant, after being duly summoned, neglected to appear on the return of the writ, or to cast an essoin, or, in case of an essoin being cast, neglected to appear on the adjournment day of the essoin; its object being to compel an appearance. Rose. Real Act. 105, et seq. It was called a “cape,” from the word with which it commenced, and a “grand cape” (or cape magnum) to distinguish if from the petit cape, which lay after appearance.

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GARENA

A term used in the old ecclesiastical law to denote a period of forty days.

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GERVUS

Lat. A stag or deer

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