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ALTERNATIVE REMAINDERS

This applies to the disposition of property in different ways where one method will take effect only if the other doesn’t. The second disposition method substitutes for the first method.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDY

Where a new remedy is created in addition to an existing one, they are called “alternative” if only one can be enforced; but if both, “cumulative.”

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ALTERNATIVE RISK TRANSFER (ART)

A product, channel, or solution that transfers RISK exposures between the INSURANCE and REINSURANCE sectors and the CAPITAL MARKETS in order to achieve specific RISK MANAGEMENT goals. As a result of regulatory rules and DIVERSIFICATION benefits, it is often desirable to shift INSURABLE RISKS to the financial sector and FINANCIAL RISKS to the insurance sector; ART mechanisms, such as CAPTIVES, DERIVATIVES, INSURANCELINKED SECURITIES, CONTINGENT CAPITAL, and ENTERPRISE RISK MANAGEMENT, make this possible. See also CONVERGENCE.

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ALTERNATIVE ROUTING

When cargo is brought on an another route that offers the same tax and terms. Refer to alernative tariff.

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ALTERNATIVE STAFFING

Hiring someone part time or seasonally. AKA contingent staffing.

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ALTERNATIVE TARIFF

When a shipper can choose the freight rates when they have two or more are available.

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ALTERNATIVE TECHNOLOGY

The way something is made with less pollution that is more efficient than the traditional method.

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ALTERNATIVE WRIT

A writ commanding the person against whom it is issued to do a specified thing, or show cause to the court why he should not be compelled to do it. Allee v. McCoy, 2 Marv. (Del.) 405, 30 Atl. 350.

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ALTERNATIVE WRIT OF MANDAMUS

Latin. the court order that commands a person against whom it has been issued to do something one else show why he should not be forced to do so. See mandamus.

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ALTERNIS VICIBUS

L. Lat. By alternate turns; at alternate times ; alternately. Co. Litt. 4a; Shep. Touch. 200.

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ALTIUS NON TOLLENDI

In the Civil law. A servitude due by the owner of a house, by which he is restrained from building beyond a certain height. Dig. 8, 2, 4; Sand.irs, Just. Inst. 119.

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ALTIUS TOLLENDI

In the civil law. A servitude which consists in the right, to him who is entitled to it, to build his house as high as he may think proper. In general, however, every one enjoys this privilege, unless he Is restrained by some contrary title. Sandars, Just. Inst 119.

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ALTMAN ZSCORE

Edward Altman’s way to file bankruptcy. It measures how well a party can pay debts and prevent insolvency.

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ALTUM MARE

L. Lat. In old English law. The high sea, or seas. Co. Litt 2006. The deep sea. Super altum mare, on the high seas. Hob. 2120.

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ALUMNI

A group of graduate of a school. They are male and female. The male version is alumnus and the female is alumna.

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ALUMNUS

A child which one has nursed ; a foster-child. Dig. 40, 2, 14. One educated at a college or seminary is called an “alumnus” thereof.

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ALVEUS

The bed or channel through which the stream flows when it runs within its ordinary channel. Calvin. Alveus derelictus, a deserted channel. Mackeld. Rom. Law,

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AMALGAMATION

A term applied In England to the merger or consolidation of two incorporated companies or societies. In the case of the Empire Assurance Corporation, (1807,) L. R. 4 Eij. 347, the vicechancellor said: “It is difficult to say what the word ‘amalgamate’ means, i confess at this moment I have not the least conception of what the full legal effect of the word is. We do not find it in any law dictionary, or expounded by any competent authority. But I am quite sure of this: that the word ‘amalgamate’ cannot mean that the execution of a deed shall make a man a partner in a firm in which he was not a partner before, under conditions of which he is in no way cognizant, and which are not the same as those contained in the former deed.” But in Adams v. Yazoo & M. V. R. Co., 77 Miss. 194, 24 South. 200, 211, 00 L. R. A. 33, it is said that the term “amalgamation” of corporations is used in the English cases in the sense of what is usually known in the United States as “merger.” meaning the absorption of one corporation by another, so that it is the absorbing corporation which continues in existence; and it differs from “consolidation,” the meaning of which is limited to such a union of two or more corporations as necessarily results in the creation of a third new corporation.

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AMALPHITAN CODE

A collection of sea-laws, compiled about the end of the eleventh century, by the people of Amalphl. It consists of the laws on maritime subjects, which were or had been in force in countries bordering on the Mediterranean; and was for a long time received as authority in those countries. Azuni; Wharton.

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AMANUENSIS

One who writes on behalf of another that which lie dictates.

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