Legal Articles

ON CONDITION

These words may be construed to mean “on the terms,” in order to effectuate the intention of parties. Mea- nor v. McKowan, 4 Watts & S. (Pa.) 302.

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ONEROUS

A contract, lease, share, or other right is said to be “onerous” when the obligations attaching to it counter-balance or exceed the advantage to be derived from it, either absolutely or with reference to the particular possessor. Sweet. As used in the civil law and In the systems derived from it, (French, Scotch, Spanish, Mexican.) the term also means based upon, supported by, or relating to a good and valuable – ONEROUS – consideration, i. e., one which imposes a burden or charge in return for the benefit conferred.

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OPETIDE

The ancient time of marriage, from Epiphany to Ash-Wednesday. Opinio est duplex, scilicet, opinio vulgaris, orta inter graves et discretos, et quae vultum veritatis babet; et opinio tantum orta inter leves et vulgares homines, absque specie veritatis. 4 Coke, 107. Opinion is of two kinds, nainely, common opinion, which springs up among grave and discreet men, aud which has the appearance of truth, aud opinion which springs up only among light and foolish men, without the semblance of truth. Opinio quae favet testamento est te- nenda. The opinion which favors a will is to be followed. 1 W. Bl. 13, arg.

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ORACDLUM

In the civil law. The name of a kind of response or sentence given by the Roman emperors.

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ORDERS OF THE DAY

Any member of the English house of commons who wishes to propose any question, or to “move the house,” as it is termed, must, in order to give the house due notice of his Intention, state the form or nature of his motion on a previous day, and have it entered in a book termed the “order-book;” and the motions so entered, the house arranges, shall be considered on particular days, and such motions or matters, when the day arrives for their being considered, are then termed the “orders of the day.” Brown. A similar practice obtains in the legislative bodies of this country.

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ORGANIZED CCUNTY

A county which has its lawful officers, legal machinery, and means for carrying out the powers and performing the duties pertaining to it as a quasi municipal corporation. In re Section No. 0, 00 Minn. 32, 08 N. W. 323.

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OSTEOPATHY

A method or system of treating various diseases of the human body without the use of drugs, by manipulation applied to various nerve centers, rubbing, pulling, and kneading parts of the body, flexing and manipulating the limbs, and the mechanical readjustment of any bones, muscles, or ligaments not in the normal position, with a view to removing the cause of the disorder and aiding the restorative force of nature in cases where the trouble originated in misplacement of parts, irregular nerve action, or defective circulation. Whether the practice of osteopathy is “practice of medicine,” and whether a school of osteopathy is a “medical college.” within the meaning of statutes, the courts have not determined. See Little v. State, 00 Neb. 740, 84 N. W. 248, 51 L. R. A. 717; Nelson v. State Board of Health. 108 Ky. 700. 57 S. W. 501, 50 L. R. A. 3S3; State v. Liffring. 01 Ohio St. 39. 55 N. E. 108. 70 Am. St. Rep. 358: Parks v. State, 159 Ind. 211, 04 N. E. 802, 59 L. R. A. 190.

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OUT OF TERM

At a time when no term of the court is beiug held; in the vacation or interval which elapses between terms of the court. See McNeill v. Hodges, 99 N. C. 248, 6 S. E. 127.

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OUTRAGE

Injurious violence, or, in general, any species of serious wrong offered to the person, feelings, or rights of another. See McKinley v. Railroad Co., 44 Iowa, 314, 24 Am. Rep. 748; Aldrich v. Howard, 8 R. I. 246; Mosnat v. Snyder, 105 Iowa, 500, 75 N. W. 356.

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OVERISSUE

To issue in excessive quantity ; to issue iu excess of fixed legal limits. Thus, “overissued stock” of a private corporation is capital stock issued in excess of the amount limited and prescribed by the charter or certificate of iucorporation. See Hayden v. Charter Oak Driving Park, 03 Conn. 142, 27 Atl. 232.

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OXGANG

In old English law. As much land as an ox could till. Co. Litt. 5a. A measure of land of uncertain quantity. In Scotland, It consisted of thirteen acres. Spel- man.

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