Archive | K RSS feed for this section

KEEPER

A custodian, manager, or superintendent; one who has the care, custody, or management of any thing or place. Schultz v. State, 32 Ohio St. 281; State v. Ilozum, 8 N. D. 548, 80 N. W. 481 ; Fishell v. Morris, 57 Conn. 547, 18 Atl. 717, 6 L. R. A. 82; McCoy v. Zane, 65 Mo. 15; Stevens v. People, 67 111. 590.

Comments are closed

KIDDLE

In old English law. A dam or open wear in a river, with a loop or narrow cut in it, accommodated for the layiug of engines to catch fish. 2 lust. 38; Blount.

Comments are closed

KINGDOM

A country where an officer called a “king” exercises the powers of gov- ernment, whether the same be absolute or limited. Wolff, Inst. Nat.

Comments are closed

KNOCK DOWN

To assign to a bidder at an auction by a knock or blow of the hammer. Property is said to be “knocked down” when the auctioneer, by the fall of his hammer, or by any other audible or visible announcement, signifies to the bidder that he is entitled to the property on paying the amount of his bid, according to tbe terms of the sale. “Knocked down” and “struck off” are synonymous terms. Sherwood v. Reade, 7 Hill (N. Y.) 430.

Comments are closed

KAIAGE, or KAIAGIUM

A wharfage- due.

Comments are closed

KENILWORTH EDICT

An edict or award between Henry III. and those who had been in arms against him; so called because made at Kenilworth Castle, in War- wickshire, anno 51 Hen. III., A. D. 1260. It coutained a composition of those who had forfeited their estates in that rebellion, which composition was five years’ rent of the es- tates forfeited. Wharton.

Comments are closed

KIDNAPPING

The forcible abduction or stealing away of a man, woman, or child from their own country, and sending them into another. It is an offense punishable at the common law by fine aud imprisonment. 4 Bl. Comm. 219. In American law, this word is seldom, if at all, applied to the abductiou of other per- sons than children, aud the intent to seud them out of the country does not seem to constitute a necessary part of the offense. The term is said to include false imprisonment. 2 Bish. Crim. Law,

Comments are closed

KINGS-AT-ARMS

The principal herald of England was of old designated “kiug of the heralds,” a title which seems to have been exchanged for “king-at-arms” about the reign of Henry IV. The kings-at-arms at present existing in England are three,

Comments are closed

KNOT

In seamen’s language, a “knot” Is a division of the log-line serving to meas- ure the rate of the vessel’s motion. The number of knots which run off from the reel in half a minute shows the number of miles the vessel sails in an hour. Hence when a ship goes eight miles an hour she is said to go “eight knots.” Webster.

Comments are closed