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KEELS

This word is applied, in England, to vessels employed in the carriage of coals. Jacob KEEP, n. A strong tower or hold in the middle of any castle or fortification, wherein the besieged make their last efforts of defense, was formerly, in England, called a “keep;” and the inner pile within the castle of Dover, erected by King Henry II. about the year 1153, was termed the “King’s Keep;” so at Windsor, etc. It seems to be some- thing of the same nature with what Is called abroad a “citadel.” Jacob. KEEP, v. 1. To retain In one’s power or possession; not to lose or part with ; to pre- serve or retain. Benson v. New York, 10 Barb. (N. Y.) 235; Deans v. Gay, 132 N. C. 227, 43 S. E. G43.2. To maintain, carry on, conduct, or manage; as, to “keep” a liquor saloon, bawdy house, gaming table, nuisance, inn, or hotel. State v. Irvin, 117 Iowa, 400, 91 N. W. 700; People v. Rice, 103 Mich. 350, 01 N. W. 540; State v. Miller, 6S Conn. 373, 30 Atl. 795; State v. Cox, 52 Vt. 474. 3. To maintain, tend, harbor, feed, and shelter; as, to “keep” a dangerous.animal, to “keep” a horse at livery. Allen v. Ham, 03 Me. 536; Skinner v. Caughey, 64 Minn. 375, 67 N. W. 203. 4. To maintain continuously and methodically for the purposes of a record; as, to KEEP 6 “keep” books. See Backus v. Richardson, 5 Johns. (N. Y.) 483. 5. To maintain continuously and -without stoppage or variation; as, when a vessel is said to “keep her course,” that is, continue in motion in the same general direction in which she was previously sailing. See The Britannia, 153 U. S. 130, 14 Sup. Ct 795, 38 L. Ed. 660.

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KIDDER

In English law. An engrosser of corn to enhance its price. Also a huckster.

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KING’S REMEMBRANCER

An officer of the central ofiice of the English supreme court. Formerly he was an officer of the exchequer, and had important duties to perform In protecting the rights of the crown; e. g., by instituting proceedings for the recovery of land by writs of intrusion, (q. v.,) and for the recovery of legacy and succession duties; but of late years administrative changes have lessened the duties of the office. Sweet

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KNIGHTENGUILD

An ancient guild or society formed by King Edgar.

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KAIA

A key, kay, or quay. Spelman.

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KEEPER

A custodian, manager, or superintendent; one who has the care, custody, or management of any thing or place. Schultz v. State, 32 Ohio St. 281; State v. Ilozum, 8 N. D. 548, 80 N. W. 481 ; Fishell v. Morris, 57 Conn. 547, 18 Atl. 717, 6 L. R. A. 82; McCoy v. Zane, 65 Mo. 15; Stevens v. People, 67 111. 590.

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KIDDLE

In old English law. A dam or open wear in a river, with a loop or narrow cut in it, accommodated for the layiug of engines to catch fish. 2 lust. 38; Blount.

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KINGDOM

A country where an officer called a “king” exercises the powers of gov- ernment, whether the same be absolute or limited. Wolff, Inst. Nat.

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KNOCK DOWN

To assign to a bidder at an auction by a knock or blow of the hammer. Property is said to be “knocked down” when the auctioneer, by the fall of his hammer, or by any other audible or visible announcement, signifies to the bidder that he is entitled to the property on paying the amount of his bid, according to tbe terms of the sale. “Knocked down” and “struck off” are synonymous terms. Sherwood v. Reade, 7 Hill (N. Y.) 430.

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