Archive | C RSS feed for this section

CWT

A hundred-weight; one hundred and twelve pounds. Helm v. Bryant, 11 B. Mon. (Ky.) 64.

Comments { 0 }

CONTINGENT DAMAGES

Where a demurrer has been filed to one or more counts in a declaration, and its consideration is postponed, and meanwhile other counts in the same declaration, not demurred to, are taken as issues, and tried, and damages awarded upon them, such damages are called “contingent damages.”

Comments { 0 }

CUMULATIVE

Additional; heaping up; Increasing; forming an aggregate. The word signifies that two things are to be added together, instead of one being a repetition or in substitution of the other. People v. Superior Court, 10 Wend. (N. Y.) 285; Regina v. Eastern Archipelago Co., 18 Eng. Law & Eq. 183.

Comments { 0 }

CURATOR AD LITEM

Guardian for the suit. In English law, the corresponding phrase is “guardian ad litem.”

Comments { 0 }

CNRIA MAGNA

In old English law. The great court; one of the ancient names of parliament.

Comments { 0 }

CURRENT FUNDS

This phrase means gold or silver, or something equivalent thereto, and convertible at pleasure into coined money. Bull v. Bank. 123 U. S. 105, 8 Sup. Ct. 02. 31 L. Ed. 97; Lacy v. llolbrook. 4 Ala. 90; Haddock v. Woods, 40 Iowa, 433.

Comments { 0 }

CURTILAGE

The enclosed space of ground and buildings immediately surrounding a dwelling-house. In its most comprehensive and proper legal signification, it includes all that space of ground and buildings thereon which is usually enclosed within the general fence immediately surrounding a principal messuage and outbuildings, and yard closely adjoining to a dwelling-house, but it may be large enough for cattle to be levant and couchant therein. 1 Chit. Gen. Pr. 175. The curtilage of a dwelling-house is a space, necessary and convenient and habitually used for the family purposes, and the carrying on of domestic employments. It includes the garden, if there be one, and it need not be separated from other lands by fence. State v. Shaw, 31 Me. 523; Com. v. Rarney, 10 Cush. (Mass.) 480; Derrickson v. Edwards, 29 N. J. Law, 474. SO Am. Dec. 220. The curtilage is the court-yard in the front or rear of a house, or at its side, or any piece of ground lying near, enclosed and used with, the house, and necessary for the convenient occupation of the house. People v. Geduey, 10 Ilun (X. Y.) 154. In Michigan, the meaning of curtilage has been extended to include more than an enclosure near the house. People v. Taylor, 2 Mich. 250.

TLD Example: The defendant claimed the search by police violated his Fourth Amendment rights because the evidence seized was within the curtilage of the home.

Comments { 0 }

CUSTOM OF YORK

A custom of intestacy in the province of York similar to that of London. Abolished by 19 & 20 Vict. c. 94.

Comments { 0 }

CUSTOS HORREI REGII

Protector of the royal granary. 2 Bl. Comm. 394.

Comments { 0 }

CYCLE

A measure of time; a space In which the same revolutions begin again; a periodical space of time. Enc. Lond.

Comments { 0 }

CONTINUING DAMAGES

are such as accrue from the same injury, or from the repetition of similar acts, between two specified periods of time.

Comments { 0 }

CUMULATIVE DIVIDEND

See STOCK

Comments { 0 }

CURATOR BONIS

In the civil law. A guardian or trustee appointed to take care of property in certain cases; as for the benefit of creditors. Dig. 42, 7. In Scot’s law. The term is applied to guardians for minors, lunatics, etc.

Comments { 0 }

CNRIA MAJORIS

In old English law. The mayor’s court. Calth. 144.

Comments { 0 }

CURRENT MONEY

The currency of the country : whatever is intended to and does actually circulate as currency; every species of coin or currency. Miller v. McKinney. 5 Lea (Tenn.) 90. In this phrase the adjective “current” is not synonymous with “convertible.” It is employed to describe money which passes from hand to hand, from person to person, and circulates through the community, and is generally received. Money is current which is received as money in the common business transactions, and is the common medium in barter and trade. Stalworth v. Blum, 41 Ala. 321.

Comments { 0 }

CURTILES TERES

In old English law. Court lands. Cowell. See COUBT LANDS.

Comments { 0 }

CUSTOM-HOUSE

In administrative law. The house or office where commodities are entered for importation or exportation; where the duties, bounties, or drawbacks payable or receivable upon such importation or exportation are paid or received; and where ships are cleared out, etc.

Comments { 0 }

CUSTOS MARIS

In old English law. Warden of the sea. The title of a high naval officer among the Saxons and after the Conquest, corresponding with admiral.

Comments { 0 }

CYNE-BOT, or CYNE-GILD

The portion belonging to the nation of the mulct for slaying the king, the other portion or tcera being due to his family. Blount

Comments { 0 }

CIVIL DAY

The solar day, measured by the diurnal revolution of the earth, and denoting the interval of time which elapses between the successive transits of the sun over the same hour circle, so that the “civil day” commences and ends at midnight. Pedersen v. Eugster, 14 Fed. 422.

Comments { 0 }