Archive | H RSS feed for this section

HABIT BUYING

Buying the same brand over and over. It is due to lack of negativity rather than loyalty. It involves low involvement products.

Comments are closed

HABITABLE REPAIR

A covenant by a lessee to "put the premises Into habitablerepair" binds him to put them into such a state that they may be occupied, not onlywith safety, but with reasonable comfort, for the purposes for which they are taken.Miller v. McCardell, 19 R. I. 304, 33 Atl. 445, 30 L R. A. 682.

Comments are closed

HABITANCY

Settled dwelling in a given place; fixed and permanent residence there.This term is more comprehensive than "domicile," for one may be domiciled In a givenplace though he does not spend the greater portion of his time there, or though he maybe absent for long periods. It is also more comprehensive than "residence," for onemay reside in a given place only temporarily or for short periods on the occasion ofrepeated visits. But in neither case could he properly be called an "inhabitant" of thatplace or be said to have his "habitancy" there. See Atkinson v. Washington & JeffersonCollege. 54 W. Va. 32, 46 S. E. 253; Hairston v. Hairston, 27 Miss. 711, 61 Am. Dec.530; Abington v. North Bridgewater. 23 Pick. (Mass.) 170. And see DOMICILE; RESIDENCE.It is difficult to give an exact definition of "habitancy." In general terms, one may bedesignated as an "inhabitant" of that place which constitutes the principal seat of hisresidence, of his business, pursuits, connections, attachments, and of his political andmunicipal relations. The term, therefore, embraces the fact of residence at a place,together with the intent to regard it and make it a home. The act and intent mustconcur. Lyman v. Fiske, 17 Pick. (Mass.) 231, 28 Am. Dec. 293.

Comments are closed

HABITANT

Fr. In French and Canadian law. A resident tenant; a settler; a tenantwho kept hearth and home ou the seigniory.

Comments are closed

HABITAT

1. the environmental conditions of a place. 2. the surroundings an organizm or species is adapted to that meets its needs. It can be light, moisture, temperature, food, and predators. It can be a big area or a small area.

Comments are closed

HABITATIO

Lat. In the civil law. The right of dwelling; the right of free residence inanother's house. Inst. 2, 5; Dig. 7, 8.

Comments are closed

HABITATION

In the civil law. Theright of a person to live in the house of another without prejudice to the property. Itdiffered from a usufruct, in this: that the usufructuary might apply the house to anypurpose, as of a store or manufactory; whereas the party having the right of habitationcould only use it for the residence of himself and family. 1 Browne, Civil Law, 184.In estates. A dwelling-house; a home- stall. 2 Bl. Comm. 4; 4 Bl. Comm. 220;Ilolmes v. Oregon & C. R. Co. (D. C.) 5 Fed. 527; Nowliu v. Scott, 10 Grat. (Va.) 65;Harvard College v. Gore, 5 Pick. (Mass.) 372.

Comments are closed

HABITUAL

a word that means a thing is usual and customary and is repeated. It also applies to bah habits such as drunkenness.

Comments are closed

HABITUAL CRIMINAL

By statute in several states, one who is convicted of a felony,having been previously convicted of any crime (or twice so convicted), or who isconvicted of a misdemeanor aud has previously (in New York) been five times convictedof a misdemeanor. Crim. Code N. Y. 1903,

Comments are closed

HABITUAL CRIMINAL STATUTE

a law that will impose a more severe punishment for a crime committed several times by the same person.

Comments are closed

HABITUAL DRUG USERS REPORTING OF

This applies to the reporting of physicians to the appropriate authorities about drug users and addicts.

Comments are closed

HABITUAL DRUNKARD

A person given to ebriety or the excessive use of intoxicatingdrink, who has lost the i>ower or the will, by frequent indulgence, to controlhis appetite for it Ludwick v. Com., 18 Pa. 174; Gourlay v. Gourlay, 16 It. I. 705, .19Atl. 142; Miskey's Appeal, 107 Pa. 020; Richards v. Richards, 19 111. App. 407; Mc- Beev. McP.ee, 22 Or. 329, 29 Pac. 887, 29 Am. St. Rep. 013.One who has the habit of indulging in intoxicating liquors so firmly fixed that hebecomes intoxicated as often as the temptation is presented by his being in the vicinitywhere liquors are sold is an "habitual drunkard," within the. meaning of the divorcq law.Magahay v. Magahay, 35 Mich. 210.In England, it is defined bv the habitual drunkards' act, 1879. (42 & 43 Vict. c. 19.)which authorizes confinement in a retreat, upon the party's own application, as "aperson who, not being amenable to any jurisdiction in lunacy, is, notwithstanding, byreason of habitual intemperate drinking of intoxicating liquor, at times dangerous tohimself, or herself, or others. or incapable of managing himself or herself, or his or heraffairs."

Comments are closed

HABITUAL DRUNKENNESS

This term applies to repeated intoxication that is due to drinking alcoholic drinks to excess.

Comments are closed

HABLE

L. Fr. In old English law. A port or harbor; a station for ships. St. 27 Hen. VI. c. 3.

Comments are closed

HACCP

The analysis of hazards and control points. It can relate to food and its possible health hazards in its distribution. It prevents contamination and uses food inspectors to do the work. It places the responsibilty on the producer of the food. It relates t

Comments are closed

HACCP PROCESS

It starts to evaluate a situation to assess the healthhazard based on the contaminant ingredients, controlled steps to prevent the hazards, and the distribution chain not being hazardous. Should the area not be taking proper measures it is noted.

Comments are closed

HACIENDA

In Spanish law. The public domain; the royal estate; the aggregatewealth of the state. The science of administering the national wealth; public economy.Also au estate or farm belonging to a private person.

Comments are closed

HACKER

A programmer that breaks into accounts to get access for the thrill of it. It is criminal action and can be altering, stealing, or taking funds.

Comments are closed

HACKNEY CARRIAGES

Carriages plying for hire iu the street. The driver is liable fornegligently losing baggage. Mas- terson v. Short, 33 How. Prac. (N. Y.) 4S0.

Comments are closed

HADBOTE

In Saxon law. A recompense or satisfaction for the violation of holyorders, or violence offered to persons in holy orders. Cowell; Blount

Comments are closed