Legal Articles

HYPOTHEC ARII CREDITORES

Lat. In the civil law. Hypothecary creditors; thosewho loaned money on the security of an hgpotlieca, (q. v.) Calvin.

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HABE, or HAVE

Lat. A form of the salutatory expression “Ave,” (hail,) in the titles ofthe constitutions of the Theodosian and Justinianean Codes. Calvin; Spelman.

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HABITATIO

Lat. In the civil law. The right of dwelling; the right of free residence inanother’s house. Inst. 2, 5; Dig. 7, 8.

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HEREDE RAPTO

An ancient writ that lay for the ravishment of the lord’s ward. Reg. Orig. 163.Hseredem Deus facit, non homo. God makes the l;eir, not man. Co. Litt. 76.

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HAIMHALDARE

In old Scotch law. To seek restitution of one’s own goods and gear,and bring the same home again. Skene de Verb. Sign.

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HAMMA

A close Joining to a house; a croft; a little meadow. Cowell.

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HANSE

An alliance or confederation among merchants or cities, for the good orderingand protection of the commerce of its members. An imposition uponmerchandise. Du Cange.

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HARO, HARRO

Fr. In Norman and early English law. An outcry, or hue and cryafter felons and malefactors. Cowell.

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HAWGH, HOWGH

In old English law. A valley. Co. Litt. 56.

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HEALTHY

Free from disease or bodily ailment, or any state of the system peculiarlysusceptible or liable to disease or bodily ailment. Bell v. Jeffreys, 35 N. C. 350.

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HEDGE-PRIEST

A vagabond priest in olden time.

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HENCEFORTH

A word of futurity, which, as employed in legal documents, statutes,and the like, always imports a continuity of action or condition from the present timeforward, but excludes all the past. Thomson v. American Surety Co., 170 N. Y. 10!). 02N. E. 1073; Opinion of Chief Justice, 7 Pick. (Mass.) 128, note.

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HERBERGAGIUM

Lodgings to receive guests in the way of hospitality. Cowell.

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HEREDITAMENTS

Tilings capable of being inherited, be it corporeal or incorporeal,real, personal, or mixed, and including not only lands and everything thereon, but alsolieir-looms, and certain furniture which, by custom, may descend to the heir togetherwith (he land. Co. Litt. 5b; 2 Bl. Comm. 17; Nell is v. Munson, 108 N. Y. 453, 15 N. E.730; Owens v. Lewis, 40 Ind. 508, 15 Am. Rep. 205; Whitlock v. Greacen. 4S N. J. Eq.350. 21 Atl. 944; Mitchell v. Warner, 5 Conn. 407; New York v. Mabie, 13 N. Y. 150, 04Am. Dec. 53S.

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HIGH DILIGENCE

The same as great diligence

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HIGH BAILIFF

An officer attached to an English county court. His duties are to attend the court when sitting; to serve summonses ; and to execute orders, warrants, writs, etc. St. 9 & 10 Vict. c. 95.

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HALF-BLOOD

A term denoting the degree of relationship which exists between those who have the same father or the same mother, but not both parents in common

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HIGH COURT OF ADMIRALTY

In English law. This was a court which exercised jurisdiction in prize cases, and had general jurisdiction in maritime causes, on the instance side. Its proceedings were usually in rem, and its practice and principles derived in large measure from the civil law. The judicature acts of 1873 transferred all the powers and jurisdiction of this tribunal to the probate, divorce, anil admiralty division of the high court of justice.

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HIGH COURT OF ERRORS AUD APPEALS

The court of last resort in the state of Mississippi.

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HIGH CRIMES

High crimes and misdemeanors are such immoral and unlawful acts as are nearly allied and equal in guilt to felony, yet, owing to some technical circumstance, do I not fall within the definition of “felony.” State ” v. Knapp, 6 Conn. 417, 16 Am. Dec. 68.

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