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HIBEBNAGIUM

The season for sowing winter corn. Cowell.

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HILARY RULES

A collection of orders and forms extensively modifying the pleadingand practice in the English superior courts of common law, established iu Hilary term,1S34. Stimson.

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HIS HONOR

A title given by the constitution of Massachusetts to the lieutenantgovernorof that commonwealth. Const. Mass. pt. 2, c. 2.

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HOCK-TUESDAY MONEY

This was a duty given to the landlord that his tenants andbondmen might solemnize tlie day on which the English conquered the Danes, beingthe second Tuesday after Easter week. Cowell.

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HOLT

Sax. In old English law. A wood or grove. Spelman; Cowell; Co. Litt. 4b.

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HOMIPLAGIUM

In old English law. The maiming of a man. Blount.

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HONORARY

As applied to public offices and other positions of responsibility or trust,this term means either that the ollice or title is bestowed upon the incumbent as a markof honor or compliment, without intending to charge him with the active discharge ofthe duties of the place, or else that he is to receive no salary or other compensation inmoney, the honor conferred by the Incumbency of the office being his only reward. SeeHas- wcll v. New York, 81 N. Y. 25S. In other connections, it means attached to orgrowing out of some honor or dignity or honorable ollice. or else it imports an obligationor duty growing out of honor or trust only, as distinguished from legal accountability.

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HORNGEED

Sax. In old English law. A tax within a forest, paid for horned beasts. Cowell; Blount

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HOSTELAGIUM

In old records. A right to receive lodging and entertainment,anciently reserved by lords in the houses of their tenants. Cowell.

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HOUSEHOLD

A family living together. May v. Smith, 48 Ala. 4S8; Woodward v.Murray, 18 Johns. (N. Y.) 402; Arthur v. Morgan, 112 U. S. 495, 5 Sup. Ct. 241, 28 L.Ed. 825. Those who dwell under the same roof and compose a family. Webster. Aman’s family living together constitutes his household, though he may have gone to another state.Belonging to the house and family; domestic. Webster.

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HUNDRED

Under the Saxon organization of England, each county or shire comprisedan indefinite number of hundreds, each hundred containing ten tit kings, orgroups of ten families of freeholders or frankpledges. The hundred was governed by ahigh constable, and had its own court; but its most remarkable feature was the corporateresponsibility of the whole for the crimes or defaults of the individual members.The introduction of this plan of organization into England Is commonly ascribed toAlfred, but the idea, as well of the collective liability as of tbe division, was probablyknown to the ancient German peoples, as we find the same thing established in theFrankish kingdom under Clothaire, and in Denmark. See 1 Bl. Comm. 115; 4 Bl. Comm. 411.

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HUSBREC

In Saxon law. The crime of housebreaking or burglary. Crabb, Eng. Law, 50, 30S.

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HYPOSTASIS

In medical jurisprudence. (1) The morbid deposition of a sediment of any kind in the body. (2) A congestion or flushing of the blood vessels, as in varicose veins. Post-mortem hypostasis, a peculiar lividity of the cadaver.

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HYSTEROTOMY

The Casarean operation. See CESAREAN SECTION.

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HIGH DILIGENCE

The same as great diligence

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HIGH CRIMES

High crimes and misdemeanors are such immoral and unlawful acts as are nearly allied and equal in guilt to felony, yet, owing to some technical circumstance, do I not fall within the definition of “felony.” State ” v. Knapp, 6 Conn. 417, 16 Am. Dec. 68.

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HIGH BAILIFF

An officer attached to an English county court. His duties are to attend the court when sitting; to serve summonses ; and to execute orders, warrants, writs, etc. St. 9 & 10 Vict. c. 95.

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HALF-BLOOD

A term denoting the degree of relationship which exists between those who have the same father or the same mother, but not both parents in common

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HIGH COURT OF ADMIRALTY

In English law. This was a court which exercised jurisdiction in prize cases, and had general jurisdiction in maritime causes, on the instance side. Its proceedings were usually in rem, and its practice and principles derived in large measure from the civil law. The judicature acts of 1873 transferred all the powers and jurisdiction of this tribunal to the probate, divorce, anil admiralty division of the high court of justice.

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HIGH COURT OF ERRORS AUD APPEALS

The court of last resort in the state of Mississippi.

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