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HESTA, or HESTHA

A little loaf of bread.

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HIGHWAY

A free and public road, way, or street; one which every person has theright to use. Abbott v. Duluth (C. C.) 104 Fed. 837; Shelby County Com’rs v. Cas- tetter,7 Ind. App. 309, 33 N. E. 986; State v. Cowan, 29 N. C. 248; In re City of New York,135 N. Y. 253, 31 N. E. 1043, 31 Am. St. Rep. 825; Parsons v. San Francisco, 23 Cal.464.”In all counties of this state, public highways are roads, streets, alleys, lanes, courts,places, trails, and bridges, laid out or erected as such by the public, or, if laid out anderected by others, dedicated or abandoned to the public, or made such in actions forthe partition of real property.” Pol. Code Cal.

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HIRER

One who hires a thing, or the labor or services of another person. Turner v.Cross, 83 Tex. 21S, 18 S. W. 57S, 15 L. It. A. 202.

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HOASTMEN

In English law. An ancient gild or fraternity at Newcastle-upon- Tyne,who dealt iu sea coal. St. 21 Jac. I. c. 3.

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HOLDING

In English law. A piece of land held under a lease or similar tenancy foragricultural, pastoral, or similar purposes.In Scotch law. The tenure or nature of the right given by the superior to the vassal.Bell.

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HOMICIDE

The killing of any human creature. 4 Bl. Comm. 177. The killing of onehuman being by the act, procurement, or omission of another. Pen. Code N. Y.

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HONESTUS

Lat. Of good character or standing. Coram duo I)us rel pluribus ririsIcgalibus et honcstis, before two or more lawful and good men. Bract fol. 61.

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HORDERA

In old English law. A treasurer. Du Cange.

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HOSPITIA

Inns. Hospitia communia, common inns. Reg. Orig. 105. Hospitia curia:,inns of court. Hospitia canccllarice, inns of chancery. Crabb, Eng. Law, 428, 420; 4Reeve, Eng. Law, 120.

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HOUR

The twenty-fourth part of a natural day; sixty minutes of time.

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HUISSERIUM

A ship used to transport horses. Also termed “uffer.”

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HURTARDUS, or HURTUS

A ram or wether.

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HYDROMETER

An instrument for measuring the density of liuids. Being immersed iuliuids, as iu water, briue, beer, brandy, etc., it determines the proportion of theirdensity, or their specific gravity, aud theuce their quality. See Rev. St U. S. i 2018 (U. S.Comp. St 1001, p. 1027.)

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HYPOTHETICAL QUESTION

A combination of assumed or proved facts and circumstances,stated in such form as to constitute a coherent and specific situation or state of facts, upon which the opinion of an expert is asked, by way of evidence on a trial. Howard v. People, 185 111. 552, 57 N. E. 441; People v. Durrant, 116 Cal. 216, 48 Pac. 85; Cowley v. People, 83 N. Y. 464, 38 Am. Rep. 464; Stearns v. Field, 90 N. Y.

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HIGH DILIGENCE

The same as great diligence

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HIGH BAILIFF

An officer attached to an English county court. His duties are to attend the court when sitting; to serve summonses ; and to execute orders, warrants, writs, etc. St. 9 & 10 Vict. c. 95.

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HALF-BLOOD

A term denoting the degree of relationship which exists between those who have the same father or the same mother, but not both parents in common

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HIGH COURT OF ADMIRALTY

In English law. This was a court which exercised jurisdiction in prize cases, and had general jurisdiction in maritime causes, on the instance side. Its proceedings were usually in rem, and its practice and principles derived in large measure from the civil law. The judicature acts of 1873 transferred all the powers and jurisdiction of this tribunal to the probate, divorce, anil admiralty division of the high court of justice.

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HIGH COURT OF ERRORS AUD APPEALS

The court of last resort in the state of Mississippi.

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HIGH CRIMES

High crimes and misdemeanors are such immoral and unlawful acts as are nearly allied and equal in guilt to felony, yet, owing to some technical circumstance, do I not fall within the definition of “felony.” State ” v. Knapp, 6 Conn. 417, 16 Am. Dec. 68.

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