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HEROUD, HERAUD

L. Fr. A herald.

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HIDE

In old English law. A measure of land, being as much as could be worked withone plow. It is variously estimated at from CO to 100 acres, but was probably determinedby local usage. Another meaning was as much land as would support onefamily or the dwellers In a mansion-house. Also a house; a dwelling-house.

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HINDU LAW

The system of native law prevailing among the Gentoos, and administeredby the government of British India.

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HLAF ffiTA

Sax. A servant fed at his master’s cost

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HOGASTER

In old English law. A sheep of the second year. Fleta, lib. 2, c. 79,

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HOMAGIO RESPECTUANDO

A writ to the escheator commanding him to deliverseisin of lands to the heir of the king’s tenant, notwithstanding his homage not done.Fitzh. Nat. Brev. 269.

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HOMOLOGACION

In Spanish law. The tacit consent and approval inferred by lawfrom the omission of the parties, for the space of ten days, to complain of the sentencesof arbitrators, appointment of syndics, or assignees of insolvents, settlements ofsuccessions, etc. Also the approval given by the judge of certain acts and agreementsfor the purpose of rendering them more binding and executory. Escriche.

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HOOKLAND

Land plowed and sown every year.

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HORS WEARD

In old English law. A service or corvee, consisting in watching thehorses of the lord. Anc. Inst. Eng.

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HOSTILARIA, HOSPITAL ARIA

A place or room in religious houses used for the reception of guests and strangers.

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HOWE

In old English law. A hill. Co. Litt. 56.

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HUNDREDES EARLDOR, or HUN- DREDES MAN

The presiding officer in the hundred court Anc. Inst. Eng.

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HUSH-MONEY

A colloquial expression to designate a bribe to hinder information;pay to secure silence.

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HYPOTHEC ARII CREDITORES

Lat. In the civil law. Hypothecary creditors; thosewho loaned money on the security of an hgpotlieca, (q. v.) Calvin.

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HIGH DILIGENCE

The same as great diligence

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HIGH BAILIFF

An officer attached to an English county court. His duties are to attend the court when sitting; to serve summonses ; and to execute orders, warrants, writs, etc. St. 9 & 10 Vict. c. 95.

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HALF-BLOOD

A term denoting the degree of relationship which exists between those who have the same father or the same mother, but not both parents in common

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HIGH COURT OF ADMIRALTY

In English law. This was a court which exercised jurisdiction in prize cases, and had general jurisdiction in maritime causes, on the instance side. Its proceedings were usually in rem, and its practice and principles derived in large measure from the civil law. The judicature acts of 1873 transferred all the powers and jurisdiction of this tribunal to the probate, divorce, anil admiralty division of the high court of justice.

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HIGH COURT OF ERRORS AUD APPEALS

The court of last resort in the state of Mississippi.

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HIGH CRIMES

High crimes and misdemeanors are such immoral and unlawful acts as are nearly allied and equal in guilt to felony, yet, owing to some technical circumstance, do I not fall within the definition of “felony.” State ” v. Knapp, 6 Conn. 417, 16 Am. Dec. 68.

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