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HOSTICIDE

One who kills an enemy.

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HOVEL

A place used by husbandmen to set their plows, carts, and other farmingutensils out of the rain and sun. A shed; a cottage; a mean house.

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HUNDREDARY

The chief or presiding officer of a hundred

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HUSGABLUM

In old records. House rent; or a tax or tribute laid upon a house. Cowell; Blount.

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HYPOTHECAKIA ACTIO

Lat. In the civil law. An hypothecary action; an action for the enforcement of an hypotheca, or lightof mortgage; or to obtain the surrender of the thing mortgaged. Inst. 4, 6, 7; Mackeld.Bom. Law,

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H

This letter, as an abbreviation, stands for Henry (a king of that name) in tbe citationof English statutes. In the Year Books, it is used as an abbreviation for Hilary term.In tax assessments and other such official records, “h” may be used as an abbreviationfor “house,” and the courts will so understand it. Alden v. Newark, 36 N. J. Law, 288;Parker v. Elizabeth, 39 N. J. Law, 693.H. A. An abbreviation for hoc anno, this year, in this year.H. B. An abbreviation for house bill, f. e., a bill in the house of representatives, asdistinguished from a senate bill.H. C. An abbreviation for house of commons, or for habeas corpus.H. L. An abbreviation for house of lords.H. R. An abbreviation for house of representatives.H. T. An abbreviation for hoc titulo, this title, under this title; used in references to books.H. V. An abbreviation for hoc verbo or hac voce, this word, under this word; used inreferences to dictionaries and other works alphabetically arranged.

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HABITANT

Fr. In French and Canadian law. A resident tenant; a settler; a tenantwho kept hearth and home ou the seigniory.

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HiEREDE DELIBERANDO AITEF-I QUI HABET CUSTODIUM TERR

An ancient writ, directed to the sheriff, to require one that had the body of au heir, beingin ward, to deliver him to the person whose ward he was by reason of his land. Reg.Orig. 101.

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HAILWORKFOLK

(i. e

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HAMLET

A small village; a part or member of a vill. It is the diminutive of “ham,” avillage. Cowell. See Rex. v. Morris, 4 Term, 552.

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HANGWITE

In Saxon law. A fine for illegal hanging of a thief, or for allowing him toescape. Immunity from such fine. Du Cange.

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HARNESS

All warlike instruments: also the tackle or furniture of a ship.

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HAWBERK

A coat or shirt of mail; hence, derivatively (in feudal law) one who held afief on the duty or service of providing himself with such armor and standing ready,thus equipped, for military service when called on. WTiarton.

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HEALTH

Freedom from sickness or suffering. The right to the enjoyment of healthis a subdivision of the right of persona! security, one of the absolute rights of persons.1 Bl. Comm. 120, 134. As to injuries affecting health, see 3 Bl. Comm. 122.

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HIGH DILIGENCE

The same as great diligence

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HIGH BAILIFF

An officer attached to an English county court. His duties are to attend the court when sitting; to serve summonses ; and to execute orders, warrants, writs, etc. St. 9 & 10 Vict. c. 95.

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HALF-BLOOD

A term denoting the degree of relationship which exists between those who have the same father or the same mother, but not both parents in common

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HIGH COURT OF ADMIRALTY

In English law. This was a court which exercised jurisdiction in prize cases, and had general jurisdiction in maritime causes, on the instance side. Its proceedings were usually in rem, and its practice and principles derived in large measure from the civil law. The judicature acts of 1873 transferred all the powers and jurisdiction of this tribunal to the probate, divorce, anil admiralty division of the high court of justice.

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HIGH COURT OF ERRORS AUD APPEALS

The court of last resort in the state of Mississippi.

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HIGH CRIMES

High crimes and misdemeanors are such immoral and unlawful acts as are nearly allied and equal in guilt to felony, yet, owing to some technical circumstance, do I not fall within the definition of “felony.” State ” v. Knapp, 6 Conn. 417, 16 Am. Dec. 68.

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