How Much Does It Cost to See a Gynecologist Without Health Insurance?

Written by James Hirby | Fact checked by The Law Dictionary staff |  

Like most other medical professionals, gynecologists earn hundreds of thousands of dollars per year and may employ handfuls of workers in support positions. For a typical gynecologist's office, the expenses associated with testing supplies, technical equipment and fixed overhead costs can be significant. Since the services that gynecologists provide are essential to the health of one-half of the world's population, these professionals are also in extremely high demand. Many overworked gynecologists have already stopped accepting new patients while many other established professionals report months-long appointment backlogs.

As both the quality and coverage of prenatal care and basic gynecological services continue to improve, demand for gynecological services will only increase. Unless the professional makeup of each successive class of new doctors changes radically, the ratio of practicing gynecologists to patients may fall even further. While gynecologists earn comfortable salaries, other medical specialties are even more lucrative. These days, most graduating medical students vie for coveted positions in highly-specialized fields like cardiology, dermatology and orthopedic surgery. Depending upon where they practice, some neurosurgeons may earn annual salaries north of $1,000,000.

As such, it's difficult to find an affordable private gynecologist. If you lack health insurance or carry a budget plan that doesn't fully cover gynecological exams, you should expect to pay at least $125 for a basic office visit that includes a pap smear and pelvic exam. If you require additional services or tests, this fee will increase accordingly.

While you won't have to pay upfront for your service and may enjoy a billing grace period of up to two months, you'll eventually be held accountable for the cost. After your grace period has expired, your balance will begin to accrue interest. As medical debts are a major cause of financial problems for young people who lack insurance, you'll need to pay promptly in order to avoid unpleasant consequences in the future.

If you expect this debt to cause financial hardship, talk to your gynecologist's billing office before receiving your bill. Depending upon your circumstances, they may be willing to work out a payment plan. If your gynecologist is a member of a larger healthcare company or works in a large practice that uses a centralized billing service, you'll almost certainly be able to pay in installments.

You can avoid private-practice prices altogether by sourcing reduced-cost gynecological services from Planned Parenthood. These may cost under $75 per visit and can be paid in installments.

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