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Category: Q

QUO JURE

Lat. In old English practice. A writ which lay for one that had land in which another claimed common, to compel the latter to show by what title he claimed it. Cowell;

QUOD PERMITTAT PROSTERNERE

That he permit to abate. In old practice. A writ, in the nature of a writ of right, which lay to abate a nuisance. 3 Bl. Comm. 221. And see Conhocton Stone

QUOV1S MODO

Lat. In whatever manner. Quum de lucro duorum quseratur, melior est causa possidentis. When the question is as to the gain of two persons, the title of the party in possession is

Q B

An abbreviation of”Queen’s Bench.”

QUANTUM MERUIT

As much as he deserved. In pleading. The common count in an action of assumpsit for work and labor, founded on an implied assumpsit or promise on the part of the defendant

QUARTA FALCIDIA

In Roman law. That portion of a testator’s estate which, by the Falcidian law. was required to be left to the heir, amounting to at least one-fourth. See Mackeld. Rom. Law,

QUEEN’S PRISON

A jail which used to be appropriated to the debtors and criminals confined under process or by authority of the superior courts at Westminster, the high court of admiralty, and also to

QUIA EMPTORES

“Because the purchasers.” The title of the statute of Westm. 3. (18 Edw. I. c. 1.) This statute took from the tenants of common lords the feudal liberty they claimed of disposing

QUIETUS

In old English law. Quit; acquitted; discharged. A word used by the clerk of the pipe, and auditors in the exchequer, in their acquittances or discharges given to accountants; usually concluding with

QUO MINUS

Lat. A writ upon which all proceedings in the court of exchequer were formerly grounded. In it the plaintiff suggests that he is the king’s debtor, and that the defendant has done

QUOD PERSONA NEC PREBEN- DARII, etc

A writ which lay for spiritual persons, distrained in their spiritual possessions, for payment of a fifteenth with the rest of the parish. Fitzh. Nat Brev. 175. Obsolete. Quod populus postremum jussit,

Q SCANDALUM MAGNATUM

In Eng- lish law. Scandal or slander of great men or nobles. Words spoken in derogation of a peer, a judge, or other great officer of the realm, for which an action

QUASI AFFINITY

In the civil law. The affinity which exists between two persons, one of whom has been betrothed to a kinsman of the other, but who have never been married.

QNASI CONTRACTS

In the civil law. A contractual relation arising out of transactions between the parties which give them mutual rights and obligations, but do not involve a specific and express convention or agreement

QUASI CORPORATIONS

Organizations resembling corporations; municipal societies or similar bodies which, though not true corporations in all respects, are yet recognized, by statutes or immemorial usage, as persons or aggregate corporations, with precise duties

QUASI PUBLIC CORPORATION

This term is sometimes applied to corporations which are not strictly public, in the sense of being organized for governmental purposes, but whose operations contribute to the comfort, convenience, or welfare of

QUATER COUSIN

Properly, a cousin in the fourth degree ; but the term has come to express auy remote degree of relationship, and even to bear an ironical signification, in which it denotes a

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