Legal Articles

BOOK DEBT

In Pennsylvania practice. The act of 2Sth March. 1895.

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BORD

An old Saxon word, signifying a cottage; a house; a table.

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BOROUGH

In English law. A town, a walled town. Co. Litt. 10S6. A town of note or importance; a fortified town. Cowell. An ancient town. Litt. 1C4. A corporate town that is not a city. Cowell. An ancient town, corporate or not, that sends burgesses to parliament. Co. Litt. 109a; 1 Bl. Comm. 114, 115. A city or other town sending burgesses to parliament. 1 Steph. Comm. 116. A town or place organized for local government A parliamentary borough is a town which returns oue or more members to parliament. In Scotch law. A corporate body erected by the charter of the sovereign, consisting of the inhabitants of the territory erected into the borough. Bell. In American law. In Pennsylvania, the term denotes a part of a township having a charter for municipal purposes; and the same is true of Connecticut. Southport v. Ogden, 23 Conn. 128. See, also, 1 Dill. Mun. Corp.

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BOTHAGIUM, OR BOOTHAGE

Customary dues paid to the lord of a manor or soil, for the pitching or standing of booths in fairs or markets.

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BOUNTY

A gratuity, or an unusual or additional benefit conferred upon, or compensation paid to, a class of persons. Iowa v. McFarland, 110 U. S. 471, 4 Sup. Ct. 210, 28 L. Ed. 108. A premium given or offered to induce men to enlist into the public service. The term is applicable only to the payment made to the enlisted man, as the inducement for his service, and not to a premium paid to the man through whose intervention, and by whose procurement, the recruit is obtained and mustered. Abbe v. Allen, 39 IIow. Prac. (N. Y.) 4S8. It is not easy to discriminate between bounty, reward, and bonus. The former is the appropriate term, however, where the services or action of many persons are desired, and each who acts upon the offer may entitle himself to the promised gratuity, without prejudice from or to the claims of others: while reward is more proper in the case of a single service, which can be only once performed, and therefore will be earned only by the person or co-operative persons who succeed while others fail. Thus, bounties are offered to all who will enlist in the army or navy: to all who will engage in certain fisheries which government desire to encourage; to all who kill dangerous beasts or noxious creatures. A reward is offered for rescuing a person from a wreck or fire: for detecting and arresting an offender; for finding a lost chattel. Kirclier v. Murray, (C. C.) 54 Fed. 624; Ingram v. Colgan, 100 Cal. 113, .SS Pac. 315, 28 L R. A. 187, 46 Am. St. Rep. 221. Bonus, as compared with bounty, suggests the idea of a gratuity to induce a money transaction between individuals; a percentage or gift, upon a loan or transfer of property, or a surrender of a right. Abbott.

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BRAHMIN, BRAHMAN, OR BRAMIN

In Hindu law. A divine; a priest; the first Hindu caste.

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BREACH OF PRIVILEGE

An act or default in violation of the privilege of either house of parliament, of congress, or of a state legislature.

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BREHON LAW

The name given to the ancient system of law of Ireland as it existed at the time of its conquest by Henry II.; and derived from the title of the judges, who were denominated “Brehons.”

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BREVET

In military law. A commission by which an officer is promoted to the next higher rank, but without conferring a right to a corresponding increase of pay. In French law. A privilege or warrant granted by the government to a private person, authorizing him to take a special benefit or exercise an exclusive privilege. Thus a brevet d’invetttion is a patent for an invention.

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BRIBERY

In criminal law. The receiving or offering any undue reward by or to any person whomsoever, whose ordinary profession or business relates to the administration of public justice, in order to influence his behavior, and to incline him to act contrary to his duty and the known rules of honesty and integrity. Hall v. Marshall, 80 Ky. 552; Walsh v. People, 05 111. 05, 16 Am. Rep. 509; Com. v. Murray, 135 Mass. 530; Hutchinson v. State, 36 Tex. 294. The term “bribery” now extends further, and includes the offense of giving a bribe to many other classes of officers; it applies both to the actor and receiver, and extends to voters, cabinet ministers, legislators, sheriffs, and other classes. 2 Whart. Crim. Law,,

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BRIGBOTEB

In Saxon and old English law. A tribute or contribution towards the’ repairing of bridges.

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BRUARIUM

In old English law. A heath ground; ground where heath grows. Spelman.

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BUILDING SOCIETY

An association in which the subscriptions of the members form a capital stock or fund out of which advances may be made to members desiring them, on mortgage security.

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BURGAGE

A name anciently given to a dwelling-house in a borough town. Blount

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BURGLARITER L

Lat (Burglariously.) In old criminal pleading. A necessary word in indictments for burglary.

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BURSARIA

The exchequer of collegiate or conventual bodies; or the place of receiving, paying, and accounting by the bursars. Also stipendiary scholars, who live upon the burse, fund, or joint-stock of the college.

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BUTTY

A local term in the north of England, for the associate or deputy of another ; also of things used in common.

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BLLAW DICT(2D ED)

back, or plainly suggests the answer which the party wishes to get from him. People v. Slather, 4 Wend. (N. Y.) 229, 247, 21 Am. Dec. 122.

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BLOCKADE

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BREACH

Conservator of the peace. See

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