Legal Articles

BROTHEL

A bawdy-house; a house of ill fame; a common habitation of prostitutes.

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BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION

An organization created for the purpose of accumulating a fund by the monthly subscriptions and savings of its members to assist them in building or purchasing for themselves dwellings or real estate by the loan to them of the requisite money from the funds of the association. McCauley v. Association, 97 Tenn. 421, 37 S. W. 212, 35 L. R. A. 244, 56 Am. St. Rep. 813; Cook v. Association, 104 Ga. 814, 30 S. E. 911; Pfels- ter v. Association, 19 W. Va. 693.

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BUREAU

An office for the transaction of business. A name given to the several departments of the executive or administrative branch of government, or to their larger subdivisions. In re Strawbridge, 39 Ala. 375.

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BURGHMOTE

In Saxon law. A court of justice held semi-annually by the bishop or lord in a burg, which the thanes were bound to attend without summons.

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BURROWMEALIS

In Scotch law. A term used to designate the rents paid into the king’s private treasury by the burgesses or inhabitants of a borough.

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BUTTED AND BOUNDED

A phrase sometimes used in conveyancing, to introduce the boundaries of lands. See BUTTS AND BOUNDS.

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BISHOP OF DURHAM, 9 VES 399

Charity, as used in the Massachusetts Sunday law, includes whatever proceeds from a sense of moral duty or a feeling of kindness and humanity, and is intended wholly for the purpose of the relief or comfort of another, and not for one’s own benefit or pleasure. Doyle v. Railroad Co., 118 Mass. 195, 197, 19 Am. Rep. 431

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B

The second letter of the English alphabet : is used to denote the second of a series of pages, notes, etc.; the subsequent letters, the third and following numbers.

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BACKBOND

In Scotch law. A deed attaching a qualification or condition to the terms of a conveyance or other instrument. This deed is used when particular circumstances render it necessary to express in a separate form the limitations or qualifications of a right. Bell. The instrument is equivalent to a declaration of trust in English conveyancing.

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BAHADUM

A chest or coffer. Fleta.

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BAIL EMPHYTEOTIQUE

An emphyteutic lease; a lease for a term of years with a right to prolong indefinitely ; practically equivalent to an alienation.

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BAIRNS

In Scotch law. A known term, used to denote one’s whole issue. Ersk. Inst. 3, 8, 48. But it is sometimes used in a more limited sense. Bell.

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BALLOT

In the law of elections. A slip of paper bearing the names of the offices to be filled at the particular election and the names of the candidates for whom the elector desires to vote; it may be printed, or written, or partly printed and partly written, and is deposited by the voter in a “ballot-box” which is in the custody of the officers holding the election. Opinion of Justices, 19 R. I. 729, 36 Atl. 716, 30 L. R. A. 547; Bris- bin v. Cleary, 26 Minn. 107, 1 N. W. 825; State v. Timothy, 147 Mo. 532. 49 S. W. 500; Taylor v. Bleakley, 55 Kan. 1, 39 Pac. 1015, 28 L. R. A. 683, 49 Am. St. Rep. 233. Also the act of voting by balls or tickets. A ballot is a ticket folded in such a manner that nothing written or printed thereon can be seen. Pol. Code Cal.

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BANI

Deodands, (q. v.)

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BANKING

The business of receiving money on deposit, loaning money, discounting notes, issuing notes for circulation, collecting money on notes deposited, negotiating bills, etc. Bank v. Turner, 154 Ind. 456, 57 N. E. 110. See BANK; BANKER.

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BANQUE FR

A bench; the table or counter of a trader, merchant, or banker. Banque route; a broken bench or counter; bankrupt

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BARK

Is sometimes figuratively used to denote the mere words or letter of an instrument, or outer covering of the ideas sought to be expressed, as distinguished from its inner substance or essential meaning. “If the bark makes for them, the pith makes for us.” Bacon.

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BLLAW DICT(2D ED)

back, or plainly suggests the answer which the party wishes to get from him. People v. Slather, 4 Wend. (N. Y.) 229, 247, 21 Am. Dec. 122.

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BLOCKADE

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BREACH

Conservator of the peace. See

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