Legal Articles

BOOT, OR BOTE

An old Saxon word, equivalent to “estovers.”

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BORGBRICHE

A breach or violation of suretyship, or of mutual fidelity. Jacob.

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BOTE

In old English law. A recompense or compensation, or profit or advantage. Also reparation or amends for any damage done. Necessaries for the maintenance and carrying on of husbandry. An allowance; the ancient name for estovers. House-bote is a sufficient allowance of wood from off the estate to repair or burn in the house, and sometimes termed “fire-bote;” plow- bote and cart-bote are. wood to be employed in making and repairing all instruments of husbandry ; and hay-bote or hedge-bote is wood for repairing of hays, hedges, or fences. The word also signifies reparation for any damage or injury done, as man-bote, which was a compensation or amends for a man slain, etc.

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BOUNDED TREE

A tree marking or standing at the corner of a field or estate.

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BOZERO

In Spanish law. An advocate ; one who pleads the causes of others, or his own, before courts of justice, either as plaintiff or defendant.

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BREACH OF DUTY

In a general sense, any violation or omission of a legal or moral duty. More particularly, the neglect or failure to fulfill in a just and proper manner the duties of an office or fiduciary employment.

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BREATH

In medical jurisprudence. The air expelled from the lungs at each expiration.

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BREVE ITA DICITNR, QUIA REM DE QUA AGITNR, ET INTENTIONEM PETENTIS, PANELS VERBIS BREVITER ENARRAT

A writ is so called because it briefly states, in few words, the matter in dispute, and the object of the party seeking relief. 2 Inst. 39.

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BREVIBUS ET ROTULIS LIBERAN- DIS

A writ or mandate to a sheriff to deliver to his successor the county, and appurtenances, with the rolls, briefs, remembrance, and all other things belonging to his office. Reg. Orig. 295.

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BRIEVE

In Scotch law. A writ. 1 Kames, Eq. 146.

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BROTHEL

A bawdy-house; a house of ill fame; a common habitation of prostitutes.

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BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION

An organization created for the purpose of accumulating a fund by the monthly subscriptions and savings of its members to assist them in building or purchasing for themselves dwellings or real estate by the loan to them of the requisite money from the funds of the association. McCauley v. Association, 97 Tenn. 421, 37 S. W. 212, 35 L. R. A. 244, 56 Am. St. Rep. 813; Cook v. Association, 104 Ga. 814, 30 S. E. 911; Pfels- ter v. Association, 19 W. Va. 693.

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BUREAU

An office for the transaction of business. A name given to the several departments of the executive or administrative branch of government, or to their larger subdivisions. In re Strawbridge, 39 Ala. 375.

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BURGHMOTE

In Saxon law. A court of justice held semi-annually by the bishop or lord in a burg, which the thanes were bound to attend without summons.

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BURROWMEALIS

In Scotch law. A term used to designate the rents paid into the king’s private treasury by the burgesses or inhabitants of a borough.

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BUTTED AND BOUNDED

A phrase sometimes used in conveyancing, to introduce the boundaries of lands. See BUTTS AND BOUNDS.

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BISHOP OF DURHAM, 9 VES 399

Charity, as used in the Massachusetts Sunday law, includes whatever proceeds from a sense of moral duty or a feeling of kindness and humanity, and is intended wholly for the purpose of the relief or comfort of another, and not for one’s own benefit or pleasure. Doyle v. Railroad Co., 118 Mass. 195, 197, 19 Am. Rep. 431

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BLLAW DICT(2D ED)

back, or plainly suggests the answer which the party wishes to get from him. People v. Slather, 4 Wend. (N. Y.) 229, 247, 21 Am. Dec. 122.

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BLOCKADE

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BREACH

Conservator of the peace. See

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