Tag Archives | explicit

CHASTE

a legal term that is applied to an unmarried female who has yet to experience sexual intercourse.

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CHASTITY

Purity; continence. That virtue which prevents the unlawful intercourse of the sexes. Also the slate of purity or abstinence from unlawful sexual connection. People v. Brown, 71 Hun, 601, 24 N. Y. Supp. 1111; People v. Kehoe, 123 Cal. 224, 55 Pac. 911, 69 Am. St. Rep. 52; State v. Carron, 18 Iowa, 375, 87 Am. Dec. 401.

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CHILD

This word has two meanings in law: (1) In the law of the domestic relations, and as to descent and distribution, it is used strictly as the correlative of “parent,” and means a son or daughter considered as in relation with the father or mother. (2) In the law of negligence, and in laws for the protection of children, etc., it is used as the CHILD 197 CHIROGRAPH opposite of “adult,” and means the young of the human species, (generally under the age of puberty,) without any reference to parentage and without distinction of sex. Miller v. Finegan, 26 Fla. 29, 7 South. 140, 6 L. R. A. 813.

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COITUS

In medical jurisprudence. Sexual intercourse; carnal copulation

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CONCUBINAGE

A species of loose or informal marriage which took place among the ancients, and which is yet In use in some countries. See CONCUBINATUS. The act or practice of cohabiting, in sexual ct^cmerce, without the authority of law or a legal marriage. State v. Adams, 179 Mo. 334, 78 S. W. 588; State v. Overstreet, 43 Kan. 299, 23 Pac. 572; Henderson v. People, 124 111. G07, 17 N. E. 68, 7 Am. St. Rep. 391. An exception against a woman suing for dower, on the ground that she was the concubine, and not the wife, of the man of whose land she seeks to be endowed. Britt. c. 107.

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CORPORAL IMBECILITY

Physical inability to perform completely the act of sexual intercourse ; not necessarily congenital, and not invariably a permanent and incurable impotence. GrifTeth v. Griffeth, 162 111. 308, 44 N. E. 820; Ferris v. Ferris, 8 Conn. 108

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COUNTY COURT

A court of high antiquity in England, incident to the jurisdiction of the sheriff. It is not a court of record, but may hold pleas of debt or damages, under the value of forty shillings. The freeholders of the county (anciently termed the “suitors” of the court) are the real judges in this court, and the sheriff is the ministerial officer. See 3 Bl. Comm. 35. 30; 3 Steph. Comm. 395. But in modern English law the name is appropriated to a system of tribunals established by the statute 9 & 10 Vict. c. 95, having a limited jurisdiction, principally for the recovery of small debts. It is also the name of certain tribunals of limited jurisdiction in the countv of Middlesex, established under the statute 2i Geo. II. c. 33. In American law. The name is used in many of the states to designate the ordinary courts of record having jurisdiction for trials at nisi prius. Their powers generally comprise ordinary civil jurisdiction, also the charge and care of persons and estates coming within legal guardianship, a limited criminal jurisdiction, appellate jurisdicton over justices of the peace, etc.

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COURT OF GENERAL QUARTER SESSIONS OF THE PEACE

In American law. A court of criminal jurisdiction in New Jersey. In English law. A court of criminal jurisdiction, in England, held in each county once in every quarter of a year, but in the county of Middlesex twice a month. 4 Steph. Comm. 317-320.

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CRIME AGAINST NATURE

the term given to a sex perversion such as that as seen between an human and an animal or between people that is seen as being deviating from “normal”.

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CUM COPULA

Lat With copulation, i. e., sexual intercourse. Used in speaking of the validity of a marriage contracted “per verba de futuro cum copula,” that is, with words referring to the future (a future intention to have the marriage solemnized) and consummated by sexual connection.

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CUNNILINGUS

This term applies to the oral-genital contact between the mouth and the genitals of a woman.

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D WHARF

A perpendicular bank or mound “of timber, or stone and earth, raised on theshore of a harbor, river, canal, etc., or extending some distance into the water, for theconvenience of lading and unlading ships – and other vessels. Webster.O A broad, plain place near a river, canal, or other water, to lay wares on that arebrought to or from the water. Cowell.A wharf is a structure erected on a shore below high-water mark, and sometimesextending into the channel, for the laying vessels along-Tside to load or unload, and on which stores are often erected for the reception ofcargoes. Doane v. Broad Street Ass’n, 6 Mass. 3.32; Langdon v. New York, 93 N. Y.151; Dubuque v. Stout, 32 Iowa, 47; Geiger v. Pilor, 8 Fla. 332; Palen v. Ocean City,64 N. J. Law, 669, 46 Atl. 774.

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DE ANNO BISSEXTTLI

Of the bissextile or leap year. The title of a statute passed in the twenty-first year of Henry III., which in fact, however, is nothing more than a sort of writ or direction to the justices of the bench, instructing them how the extraordinary day in the leap year was to be reckoned in cases where persons had a day to appear at the distance of a year, as on the essoin de malo lecti, and the like. It was thereby directed that the additional day should, together with that which went before, be reckoned only as one, and so, of course, within the preceding year. 1 Reeve, Eng. Law, 266.

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DEATH RATE

The deaths/1000 people. It is broken down by sex and age group. AKA crude death rate. Refer to standardized death rate.

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DECRETALES BONIFACII OCTAVI

A supplemental collection of the canon law, published by Boniface VIII. in 1208, called,
also, “Liber Sex t us Dccretalium,” (Sixth Book of the Decretals.)

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Dementia

A form of insanity resulting from degeneration or disorder of the brain (ideo- pathic or traumatic, but not congenital) and characterized by general mental weakness and decrepitude, forgetfuiness, loss of coherence, and total inability to reason, but not accompanied by delusions or uncontrollable impulses. Pyott v. Pyott, 90 III. App. 221; Hall v. Unger, 2 Abb. U. S. 510, Fed. Cas. No. 5,949; Dennett v. Dennett, 44 N. H. 531, 84 Am. Dec. 97; People v. Lake, 2 Parker, Cr. R. (N. Y.) 218. By some writers dementia is classed as a terminal stage of various forms of insanity, and hence may follow mania, for example, as its final condition. Among the sub-divisions of de- mentia should be noticed the following: Acuite primary dementia is a form of temporary dementia, though often extreme in its intensity, and occurring in young people or adolescents, accompanied by general physical debility or exhaustion and induced by conditions likely to produce that state, as malnutrition, overwork, dissipation, or too rapid growth. Dementia paralytica is a progressive form of insanity, beginning with slight degeneration of the physical, intellectual, and moral powers, and leading to complete loss of mentality, or imbecility, with general paralysis. Also called paresis, paretic dementia, or cirrhosis of the brain, or (popularly) “softening of the brain.” Dementia prircox. A term applicable either to the early stages of dementia or to the dementia of adolescence, but more commonly applied to the latter. It is often (but not invariably) attributable to onanism or self-abuse, and is characterized by mental and moral stupidity, absence of any strong feeling of the impressions of life or interest in its events, blunting or obscuration of the moral sense, weakness of judgment, flightiness of thought, senseless laughter without mirth, automatic obedience, and apathetic despondency. (Kraepelin.) Senile dementia. Dementia occurring in persons of advanced age, and characterized by slowness and weakness of the mental processes and general physical degeneration, verging on or passing into imbecility, indicating the breaking down of the mental powers in advance of bodily decay. ITiett v. Shull. 36 W. Va. 5a3, 15 S. E. 146: Pyott v. Pvott, 191 HI. 280. 61 N. E. 88; McDaniel v. McCoy, 68 Mich. 332. 36 N. W. 84; llamon v. Hamon, 180 Mo. 685, 79 S. W. 422. Toxic dementia. Weakness of mind or feeble cerebral activity, approaching imbecility, ‘resulting from continued administration or use of slow poisons or of the mere active poisons in repeated small doses, as in cases of lead poisoning and in some cases of addiction to such drugs as opium or alcohol.

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DEMOGRAPHIC FACTORS

Characteristics assigned to age, sex, education, income, marital status, job, religion, birth rate, death rate, family size, and marriage age. It is done to every member of the population.

 TLD Example: Many retailers base their marketing strategies on demographic factors, such as age, gender, marital status and income of potential customers who might be interested in purchasing their products.

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DEPOSITUM

Lat. In the civil law. One of the forms of the contract of bailment,being a naked bailment of goods to be kept for the use of the bailor without reward.Foster v. Essex Bank, 17 Mass. 498, 9 Am. Dec. ICS; Coggs v. Bernard, 2 Ld. Raym.912. See DEPOSIT.One of the four real contracts specified by Justinian, and having the followingcharacteristics: (1) The depositary or depositee is not liable for negligence, howeverextreme, but only for fraud, dolus; (2) the property remains in the depositor, thedepositary having only the possession, I’recarium and sequcstre were two varieties ofthe depositum.

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DOUBLE INSURANCE

is where divers insurances are made upon the same interest in thesame subject against the same risks in favor of the same assured, in proportionsexceeding the value. 1 Phill. Ins. S

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DYSPAREUNIA

In medical jurisprudence. Incapacity of a woman to sustain the act of sexual intercourse except with great difficulty and pain.

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