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YEA AND NAY

Yes and no. According to a charter of Athelstan, the people of Riponwere to be believed in all actions or suits upon their yea aud nay, without the yynecessity of taking any oath. Brown.

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YEAR

The period in which the revolution of the earth round the sun, and the accompanyingchanges in the order of nature, are completed. Generally, when a statute Yspeaks of a year, twelve calendar, and not lunar, months are intended. Cro. Jac. 166.The year is either astronomical, ecclesiastical, or regnal, beginning on the 1st ofJanuary, or 25th of March, or the day of the sover- w eign’s accession. Wharton.I

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YEAS AND NAYS

The affirmative and negative votes on a bill or measure before alegislative assembly. “Calling the yeas and nays” is calling for the individual and oralvote of each member, usually upon a call of the roll.

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YEME

In old records. Winter; a corruption of the Latin “hiems.”

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YEOMAN

In English law. A commoner; a freeholder under the rank of gentleman. Cowell. A man who has free land of forty shillings by the year; who was ancientlythereby qualified to serve on juries, vote for knights of the shire, and do any other act,where the law requires one that is probus et legalis homo. 1 Bl. Comm. 400, 407.This term is occasionally used in American law, but without any definite meaning,except In the United States navy, where it designates an appointive petty officer, whohas charge of the stores and supplies in his department of the ship’s economy.

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YEVEN, or YEOVEN

Given; dated. Cowell.

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YIELD

In the law of real property, is to perform a service due by a tenant to hislord. Hence the usual form of reservation of a rent in a lease begins with the words”yielding and paying.” Sweet

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YIELDING AND PAYING

In conveyancing. The initial words of that clause in leasesIn which the rent to be paid by the lessee is mentioned and reserved.

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YOKELET

A little farm, requiring but a yoke of oxen to till It.

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YORK, CUSTOM OF

A custom of the province of York in England, by which theeffects of an intestate, after payment of his debts, are in general divided according tothe ancient universal doctrine of the pars ra- tionabilis; that is, one-third each to thewidow, children, and administrator. 2 Bl. Comm. 518.

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YORK, STATUTE OF

An Important English statute passed at the city of York, in thetwelfth year of Edward II., containing provisions on the subject of attorneys, witnesses,the taking of inquests by nisi prius, etc. 2 Beeve, Eng. Law, 200-302.

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YORKSHIRE REGISTRIES

The registries of titles to land provided by acts ofparliament for the ridings of the county of York In England. These resemble the officesfor the registration or recording of deeds commonly established in the several countiesof the states.

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