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YOUNGER CHILDREN

This phrase, when used in English conveyancing with referenceto settlements of land, signifies all such children as are not entitled to the rightsof an eldest son. It therefore includes daughters, even those who are older than theeldest son. Mozley & Whitley.

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YACHT

A light sea-going vessel, used only for pleasure-trips, racing, etc. Webster. TSee 22 St.. at Large, 566 (U. S. Comp. St I 1001, p. 2845); Rev. St U. S.

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YOUTH

This word may include children and youth of both sexes. Nelson v. Cushlng,2 Cush. (Mass.) 519, 528.

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YARD

A measure of length, containing three feet, or thirty-six inches.UA piece of land inclosed for the use and accommodation of the inhabitants of a house.

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YULE

The times of Christmas and Lammas.

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YARDLAND

or virgata torrce, is a quantity of land, said by some to be twenty acres,y but by Coke to be of uncertain extent

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YVERNAIL

BLE. L. Fr. Winter grain. Kelham.

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YEA AND NAY

Yes and no. According to a charter of Athelstan, the people of Riponwere to be believed in all actions or suits upon their yea aud nay, without the yynecessity of taking any oath. Brown.

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YEAR

The period in which the revolution of the earth round the sun, and the accompanyingchanges in the order of nature, are completed. Generally, when a statute Yspeaks of a year, twelve calendar, and not lunar, months are intended. Cro. Jac. 166.The year is either astronomical, ecclesiastical, or regnal, beginning on the 1st ofJanuary, or 25th of March, or the day of the sover- w eign’s accession. Wharton.I

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YEAS AND NAYS

The affirmative and negative votes on a bill or measure before alegislative assembly. “Calling the yeas and nays” is calling for the individual and oralvote of each member, usually upon a call of the roll.

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YEME

In old records. Winter; a corruption of the Latin “hiems.”

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YEOMAN

In English law. A commoner; a freeholder under the rank of gentleman. Cowell. A man who has free land of forty shillings by the year; who was ancientlythereby qualified to serve on juries, vote for knights of the shire, and do any other act,where the law requires one that is probus et legalis homo. 1 Bl. Comm. 400, 407.This term is occasionally used in American law, but without any definite meaning,except In the United States navy, where it designates an appointive petty officer, whohas charge of the stores and supplies in his department of the ship’s economy.

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