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TUB

In mercantile law. A measure containing sixty pounds of tea, and from fifty- six to eighty-six pounds of camphor. Jacob.

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TURPIS

Dat. In the civil law. Base; mean ; vile ; disgraceful; Infamous ; unlawful. Applied both to things and persons. Calvin.

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TYBURN TICKET

A certificate which was given to the prosecutor of a felon to conviction.

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TEDIFICIA SOLO CEDUNT

Buildings belong to [go with] the soil. Fleta, lib. 3, c. 2,

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TO AFFCCR AN AMERCEMENT

To establish the amount which oue amerced in a courtleet should pay.

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TO AFFCCR AN ACCOUNT

To confirm It on oath in the exchequer. Cowell; Blount; Spelman.

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TRADING; CORPORATIONS

A trading corporation is a commercial corporation engaged In buying and selling. The word “trading,” is much narrower in scope than “business,” as applied to corporations, and though a trading corporation is a business corporation, there are many business corporations which are not trading companies. Dartmouth College v. Woodward. 4 Wheat 009, 4 I* Ed. G29; Adams v. Railroad Co., 1 Fed. Cas. 92.

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TRAMP CORPORATIONS

Companies chartered in one state without any intention of doing business therein, but which carry on their business and operations wholly In other states. Slate v. Georgia Co., 112 N. C. 34, 17 S. E. 10, 10 L. It. A. 485.

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TREBLE COSTS

A rate of costs given in certain actions, consisting, according to its technical import, of the common costs, half of these, and half of the latter. 2 Tidd, Pr. 988. The word “treble.” in this application, is not understood in its literal sense of thrice the amount of single costs, but signifies merely the addition together of the three sums fixed as above. Id. Treble costs have been abolished in England, by St. 5 & 6 Vict. c. 97. In American law. In Pennsylvania and New Jersey the rule is different. When an act of assembly gives treble costs, the party is allowed three times the usual costs, with the exception that the fees of the officers are not to be trebled when they are not regularly or usually payable by the defendant. Shoemaker v. Nesbit, 2 Rawle (Pa.) 203; Welsh v. Anthony, 16 Pa. 256; Mairs v. Sparks, 5 N. J. Law, 516.

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T B 4 Hen VII 136

The right of testaments belongs to the ordinary.

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TRANSCRIPTITIA

Nomen est quasi rei notamen. A name is, as it were, the note of a thing. 11 Coke, 20. Nomen non sufficit, si res non sit de jure ant de facto. A name is not sufficient if there be not a thing [or subject for it] de jure or de facto. 4 Coke, 1076. Nomina mutabilia sunt, res autem im- mobiles. Names are mutable, but things are immovable, [immutable.] A name may be true or false, or may change, but the thing itself always maintains its identity. 6 Coke, CG. Nomina si nescis perit coguitio rerum| et nomina si perdas, certe distinctio rerum perditur. Co. Litt. 8G. If you know not the names of things, the knowledge of things themselves perishes; and, if you lose the names, the distinction of the things is certainly lost. Nomina sunt notse rerum. 11 Coke, 20. Names are the notes of things. Nomina sunt symbola rerum. Godb. Names are the symbols of things.

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tECONOMICUS

L. Lat. In oid English law. The executor of a last will and testament. Cowell. (ECONOMUS. Lat. In the civil law. A manager or administrator. Calvin.

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