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LEPORARIUS

A greyhound. Cowell.

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LETTING OUT

The act of awarding a contract; c. p., a construction contract, or contract for carrying the mails.

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LEX SCKIPTA SI CESSET719 LIBEL

Lex scripta si cesset, id custodiri oportet quod moribus et consuetudine inductum est; et, si qua in re hoc de- fecerit, tunc id quod proxiwuin et con- sequens ei est; et, si id non appareat, tunc jus quo urbs Romana utitur servari oportet. 7 Coke, 19. If the written law be silent, that which is drawn from manners aud custom ought to be observed; and, if that is iu any manner defective, then that which is next and analogous to it; and, if that does not appear, then the law which Rome uses should be followed. This maxim of Lord Coke is so far followed at the present day that, in cases where there is no precedent of the English courts, the civil law is always heard with respect, and often, though not necessarily, followed. Wharton. Lex semper dabit remedium. The law will always give a remedy. Branch, Princ.; Broom, Max. 192. Lex semper intendit qnod convenit ration!. Co. Litt. 786. The law always Intends what is agreeable to reason. Lex spectat naturae ordinem. The law regards the order of nature. Co. Litt. 1976. Lex succurrit ignorant!. Jenk. Cent. 15. The law assists the ignorant. Lex succurrit minoribus. The law aids minors. Jenk. Cent. p. 51, case 97. Lex uno ore omnes alloquitur. The law addresses all with one [the same] mouth or voice. 2 Inst. 184. Lex vigilantibus, non dormientibus, subvenit. Law assists the wakeful, not the sleeping. 1 Story, Cont

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LIBERTATIBUS ALLOCANDIS

A writ lying for a citizen or burgess, impleaded contrary to his liberty, to have his privilege allowed. Reg. Orig. 202. LIBERTATIBUS EXIGENDIS 722 LIBERTY

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LICENSE

In the law of contracts. A permission, accorded by a competent authority, conferring the right to do some act which without such authorization would be illegal, or would be a trespass or a tort. State v. Hipp, 38 Ohio St. 220; Youngblood v. Sexton, 32 Mich. 406, 20 Am. Rep. 054; Hubman v. State, 61 Ark. 4S2. 33 S. W. 843; Chicago v. Collins, 175 111. 445. 51 N. E. 907, 49 L. R. A. 40S, 67 L. R. A. 224. Also the written evidence of such permission. In real property law. An authority to do a particular act or series of acts upon an- other’s land without possessing any estate therein. Clifford v. O’Neill, 12 App. Div. 17, 42 X. Y. Supp. 607; Davis v. Townsend, 10 Barb. (X. Y.) 343; Morrill v. Mackman, 24 Mich. 282, 9 Am. Rep. 124; W.vnu v. Garland, 19 Ark. 23, 08 Am. Dec. 190; Cheever v. Pearson, 16 Pick. (Mass.) 266. Also the written evidence of authority so accorded. It is distinguished from an “easement.” which implies an interest in the land to be affected, and a “lease,” or right to take the prolits of land. It may be. however, and often, is. coupled with a grant of some interest iu the land itself, or right to take the profits. 1 Washb. Real Prop. *398. In pleading. A plea of justification to an action of trespass that the defendant was authorized by the owner of the freehold to commit the trespass complained of. In the law of patents. A written au- ?? thority granted by the owner of a patent to WI LICENSE 724 LICERK another person empowering the latter to make or use the patented article for a limited period or in a limited territory. In international law. Permission granted hy a belligerent state to its own subjects, or to the subjects of the enemy, to carry on a trade interdicted by war. Wheat. Int. Law, 447.

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LIE TO

To adjoin. A cottage must have had four acres of laud laid to it. See 2 Show. 279.

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LIGEA

I11 old English law. A liege- woman ; a female subject. Reg. Orig. 3126.

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LTNAKIUM

In old English law. A flax plat, where flax is grown. Du Cange.

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LIST

A docket or calendar of causes ready for trial or argument, or of motions ready for hearing.

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LITIGIOSITY

In Scotch law. The pendency of a suit; it is a tacit legal prohibition of alienation, to the disappointment of an action, or of diligence, the direct object of which is to obtain possession, or to acquire the property of a particular subject. The effect of it is analogous to that of inhibition. Bell.

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LLOYD’S

An association in the city of London, for the transaction of marine insur- ance, the members of which underwrite each other’s policies. See Durbrow v. Eppens, 05 N. J. Law, 10, 40 Atl. 5S5.

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LOCMAN

Fr. In French marine law. A local pilot whose business was to assist the pilot of the vessel in guiding her course into a harbor, or through a river or channel. Martin v. Farnsworth, 33 N. Y. Super. Ct 260.

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LOGIUM

In old records. A lodge, hovel, or outhouse.

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LUCRATIVE

promised or agreed to pay, any valuable consideration for the chance of obtaining such property, or a portion of it, or for any share of or interest in such property, upou any agreement, understanding, or expectation that it is to be distributed or disposed of by lot or chance, whether called a “lottery,” a “raffle,” or a “gift enterprise,” or by whatever name the same may be known. Pen. Code Cal.

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LUCTUOSA HiEREDITAS

A mournful inheritance. See H^EKEDITAS LUCTUOSA.

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LYING BY

A person who, by his presence and silence at a transaction which affects his interests, may be fairly supposed to acquiesce in it, if he afterwards propose to disturb the arrangement, is said to lie prevented from doing so by reason that he has been lying by.

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LIQUIDATED AND UNLIQUIDATED DAMAGES

The former term is applicable when the amount of the damages has been ascertained by the judgment in the action, or when a specific sum of money has been expressly stipulated by the parties to a bond or other contract as the amount of damages to be recovered by either party for a breach of the agreement by the other. Watts v. Shep- pard, 2 Ala. 445; Smith v. Smith, 4 Wend. (N. Y.) 470: Keeble v. Keeble, 85 Ala. 552, 5 South. 149: Eakin v. Scott, 70 Tex. 442, 7 S. W. 777. Unliquidated damages are such as are not yet reduced to a certainty in respect of amount, nothing more being established than the plaintiff’s right to recover; or such as cannot be fixed by a mere mathematical calculation from ascertained data in the case. Cox v. Mclaughlin, 76 Cal. 60, 18 Pac. 100, 9 Am. St. Rep. 164.

TLD Example 1: The contract contained a liquidated damages clause, so the plaintiff in the breach of contract lawsuit did not have to prove the amount of its losses.

TLD Example 2: Personal injury lawsuits require a victim to present evidence establishing the amount of its unliquidated damages in order to receive compensation.

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LAND DAMAGES

A term sometimes applied to the amount of compensation to be paid for land taken under the power of eminent domain or for injury to, or depreciation of, land adjoining that taken. People v. Hilts, 27 Misc. Rep. 290, 58 N. Y. Supp. 434; In re Lent, 47 App. Div.

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LAW DAY

The day prescribed in a bond, mortgage, or defeasible deed for payment of the debt secured thereby, or, in default of payment, the forfeiture of the property mortgaged. But this does not now occur until foreclosure. Ward v. Lord, 100 Ga. 407, 28 S. E. 440; Moore v. Norman, 43 Minn. 428, 45 N. W. 857, 9 L. R. A. 55, 19 Am. St. Rep. 247; ICortright v. Cady, 21 N. Y. 345. 78 Am. Rep. 145.

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LEGAL DAY

A juridical day. See fupra. And see HelTner v. Heffner, 48 La. Ann. 10S8, 20 South. 281.

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