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LITERATURA

“Ad lit era tit ram po- ncrc” means to put children to school. This liberty was anciently denied to those parents who were servile tenants, without the lord’s consent. The prohibition against the education of sons arose from the fear that the son, being bred to letters, might enter into holy orders, and so stop or divert the services which he might otherwise do as heir to his father. Paroeh. Antiq. 401.

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LITURA

Lat. In the civil law. An obliteration or blot in a will or other instrument. Dig. 28, 4, 1, 1.

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LOCATIO

Lat. In the civil law. Let ting for hire. The term is also used by text- writers upon the law of bailment at common law. In Scotch law It is translated “loca- tion.” Bell.

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LODGINGS

Habitation in another’s house; apartments in another’s house, furnished or unfurnished, occupied for habitation ; the occupier being termed a “lodger.”

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LOSS

In insnrance. The injury or damage sustained by the insured in consequence of the happening of one or more of the accidents or misfortunes against which the insurer, in consideration of the premium, has undertaken to indemnify the insured. 1 Bouv. Inst no. 1215.

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LUCRATIVA CAUSA

Lat. In Roman law. A consideration which is voluntary; that is to say, a gratuitous gift, or such like. It was opposed to oncrosa causa, which denoted a valuable consideration. It was a principle of the Roman law that two lucrative causes could not concur in the same person as regarded the same thing; that is to say, that, when the same thing was bequeathed to a person by two different testators, he could not have the thing (or its value) twice over. Brown.

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LUPINUM CAPUT GERERE

Lat. To be outlawed, and have one’s head exposed, like a wolf’s, with a reward to him who should take it. Cowell.

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LAC, LAK

In Indian computation, 100,000. The value of a lac of rupees is about

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L^ETHE, or LATHE

A division or district peculiar to the county of Kent. Spelman.

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LAMBARD’S ARCHAIONOMIA

A work printed in 1568, containing the Anglo- Saxon laws, those of William the Conqueror, and of Henry I.

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LANDEGANDMAN

Sax. In old English law. A kind of customary tenant or inferior tenant of a manor. Spelman.

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LANZAS

In Spanish law. A commutation in money, paid by the nobles and high officers, in lieu of the quota of soldiers tiiey might be required to furnish in war. Tre- vino v. Fernandez, 13 Tex. 000.

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LATA CULPA

Lat. In the law of bailment. Gross fault or neglect; extreme negligence or carelessness, (nimia negligentia.) Dig. 50, 16, 213, 2. Lata culpa dolo sequiparatur. Gross negligence is equivalent to fraud.

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LATINARIUS

An interpreter of Latin.

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LAUNCH

1. The act of launching a vessel; the movement of a vessel from the land into the water, especially the sliding on ways from the stocks on which it is built. Ilomer v. The Lady of the Ocean, 70 Me. 352. 2. A boat of the largest size belonging to a ship of war; au open boat of large size used in any service; a lighter.

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LE ROI, or ROY

The old law-Freuch words for “the king.”

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LEASEHOLD

An estate in realty held under a lease; an estate for a fixed term of years. See Stubbings v. Evanstou, 136 111. 37, 26 N. E. 577, 11 L. R. A. 839, 29 Am. St. Rep. 300; Washington F. Ins. Co. v. Kelly, 32 Md. 421, 3 Am. Rep. 140; Harley v. O’Donnell, 9 Pa. Co. Ct. It. 56.

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LEET

In English law. The name of a court of criminal jurisdiction, formerly of much importance, but latterly fallen into disuse. See COURT-LEET.

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LEGATES

Nuncios, deputies, or extraordinary ambassadors sent by the pope to be LEGATION 709

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LEGIT VEL NON?

In old English practice, this was the formal question propounded to the ordinary when a prisoner claimed the benefit of clergy,

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