Legal Articles

INTERPELLATION

In the civil law. The act by which, in consequence of an agree- ment, the party bound declares that he will not be bound beyond a certain time. Wolff, Inst. Nat.

Comments are closed

INTERVENTION

In international law. Intervention Is such an interference between two or more states as may (according to the event) result in a resort to force; while mediation always is, and is intended to be and to continue, peaceful only. Intervention between a sovereign and his own subjects is not justified by anything in international law; but a remonstrance may be addressed to the sovereign in a proper ease. Brown. In English ecclesiastical law. The proceeding of a third person, who, not being originally a party to the suit or proceeding, but claiming an interest in the subject-mat- ter In dispute, in order the better to protect such interest, interposes his claim. 2 Chit. Pr. 492; 3 Chit. Commer. Law, 033 ; 2 Ilagg. Const. 137; 3 Phillim. Ecc. Law, 586. In the civil law. The act by which a third party demands to be received as a party in a suit pending between other persons. The intervention is made either for the purpose of being joined to the plaintiff, and to claim the same thing he does, or some other thing connected with it; or to join the defendant, and with him to oppose the claim of the plaintiff, which it is his interest to defeat. Poth. Proc. Civile, pt. 1, c. 2,

Comments are closed

INTRA PARIETES

Between walls; among friends; out of court; without litigation. Calvin.

Comments are closed

INURE

To take effect; to result. Cedar Rapids Water Co. v. Cedar Rapids, 118 Iowa, 234, 91 N. W. 1081; Hinson v. Booth, 39 Fla. 333, 22 South. 687; Holmes v. Tallada, 125 Pa. 133, 17 Atl. 238, 3 L. R. A. 219, 11 Am. St. Rep. 880.

Comments are closed

INVEST

To loan money upon securities of a more or less permanent nature, or to place It in business ventures or real estate, or otherwise lay it out, so that it may pro- duce a revenue or income. Drake v. Crane. 127 Mo. S5, 29 S. W. 990, 27 L. It. A. 653; Stramann v. Scheeren, 7 Colo. App. 1, 42 Pac. 191; Una v. Dodd, 39 N. J. Eq. 180. To clothe one with the possession of a fief or benefice. See INVESTITURE.

Comments are closed

IRREGULAR

Not according to rule; improper or insufficient, by reason of departure from the prescribed course. As to irregular “Deposit,” “Indorsement,” “Process,” and “Succession,” see those titles.

Comments are closed

IRROTULATIO

L. Lat. An enrolling; a record.

Comments are closed

In old English law

A personal action. In this sense, the term was borrowed from the civil law by Bracton. The English form is constantly used as the designation of one of the chief divisions of civil actions.

Comments are closed

INADEQUATE DAMAGES

Damages are called “inadequate,” within the rule that an injunction will not be granted where adequate damages at law could be recovered for the injury sought to be prevented, when such a recovery at law would not compensate the parties and place them in the position in which they formerly stood. Insurance Co. v. Bonner, 7 Colo. App. 97, 42 Pac. 081.

Comments { 0 }

IMAGINARY DAMAGES

This term is sometimes used as equivalent to “exemplary,” “vindictive,” or “punitive” damages. Murphy v. Hobbs, 7 Colo. 541, 5 Pac. 119. 49 Am. Rep. 366

Comments { 0 }

INTERVENING DAMAGES

Such damages to an appellee as result from the delay caused by the appeal. McGregor v. Balch, 17 Vt. 508; Peasely v. Buckminster, 1 Tvler (Vt.) 207; Roberts v. Warner, 17 Vt. 40, 42 Am. Dec. 478.

Comments { 0 }