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ITA EST

Lat. So it is; so it stands. In modern civil law, this phrase is a form of attestation added to exemplifications from a notary’s register when the same are made by the successor in office of the notary who made the original entries.

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ITA LEX SCRIPTA EST

Lat. So the law is written. Dig. 40, 9, 12. The law- must be obeyed notwithstanding the apparent rigor of its application. 3 Bl. Comm. 430. We must be content with the law as it stands, without inquiring into its reasons. 1 Bl. Comm. 32.

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ITA QUOD

Lat. In old practice. So that. Formal words iu writs. Ita quod habeas corpus, so that you have the body. 2 Mod. ISO. The name of the stipulation in a submission to arbitration which begins with the words “so as [ita quod] the award be made of and upon the premises.” In old conveyancing. So that. An expression which, when used in a deed, formerly made an estate upon condition. Litt.

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ITEM

Also; likewise; again. This word was formerly used to mark the beginning of a new paragraph or division after the first, whence is derived the common application of it to denote a separate or distinct particular of an account or bill. See Horwitz v. Nor- ris, 60 Pa. 2S2; Baldwin v. Morgan, 73 Miss. 270, 18 South. 910. The word is sometimes used as a verb. “The whole [costs] in this case that was thus itemed to counsel.” Bunb. p. 104, case 233.

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ITEMIZE

the term used to describe the recording of each item individually.

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ITER

Lat. In the civil law. A way; a right of way belonging as a servitude to an estate in the country, (prccdium rusticum.) The right of way was of three kinds: (1) iter, a right to walk, or ride on horseback, or in a litter; (2) actus, a right to drive a beast or vehicle; (3) via, a full right of way, comprising right to walk or ride, or drive beast or carriage. Ileinec.

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ITERATIO

Lat. Repetition. In the Roman law, a bonitary owner might liberate a slave, and the quiritary owner’s repetition (iteratio) of the process effected a complete manumission. Brown.

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ITINERA

Eyres, or circuits. 1 Reeve, Eng. Law, 52.

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ITINERANT

Wandering; traveling; applied to justices who make circuits. Also applied in various statutory and municipal laws (in the sense of traveling from place to place) to certain classes of merchants, traders, and salesmen. See Shift v. State, 84 Ala. 454, 4 South. 419; Twining v. Elgiu, 38 111. App. 357; Rev. Laws Mass. 1902. p. 595, c. 05.

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ITINERANT VENDOR

the name given to a seller who travels from place to place to sell his wares.

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IXIRNKEY

the term that is given to the person who is holding the keys to a prison or jail.

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