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INTERMITTENT EASEMENT See EASEMENT INTERMIXTURE OF GOODS

Confusion of goods; the confusing or mingling together of goods belonging to different owners in such a way that the property of neither owner can be separately identified or extracted from the mass. See Smith v. Sanborn, 0 Gray (Mass.) 134. And see CONFUSION OP GOODS.

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INTERROGATORIES

A set or series of written questions drawn up for the purpose of being propounded to a party in equity, a garnishee, or a witness whose testimony is taken on deposition; a series of formal written questions used in the judicial examination of a party or a witness. In taking evidence on depositions, the interrogatories are usually prepared and settled by counsel, and reduced to writing in advance of the examination. Interrogatories are either direct or cross, the former being those which are put on behalf of the party calling a witness; the latter are those which are interposed by the adverse party.

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INTOL AND UTTOL

In old records. Toll or custom paid for things imported and exported, or bought in and sold out. Cowell.

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INTROMISSION

In Scotch law. The assumption of authority over another’s property, either legally or illegally. The irregular intermeddling with the effects of a deceased person, which subjects the party to the whole debts of the deceased, is called “vitious intromission.” Kames, Eq. b. 3, c. 8,

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INVENTIO

In the civil law. Finding ; one of the modes of acquiring title to property by occupancy. Ileinecc. lib. 2, tit 1,

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IPSE

Lat. lie himself; the same; the very person.

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IRREVOCABLE

Which cannot be revoked or recalled

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ITER

Lat. In the civil law. A way; a right of way belonging as a servitude to an estate in the country, (prccdium rusticum.) The right of way was of three kinds: (1) iter, a right to walk, or ride on horseback, or in a litter; (2) actus, a right to drive a beast or vehicle; (3) via, a full right of way, comprising right to walk or ride, or drive beast or carriage. Ileinec.

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INADEQUATE DAMAGES

Damages are called “inadequate,” within the rule that an injunction will not be granted where adequate damages at law could be recovered for the injury sought to be prevented, when such a recovery at law would not compensate the parties and place them in the position in which they formerly stood. Insurance Co. v. Bonner, 7 Colo. App. 97, 42 Pac. 081.

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IMAGINARY DAMAGES

This term is sometimes used as equivalent to “exemplary,” “vindictive,” or “punitive” damages. Murphy v. Hobbs, 7 Colo. 541, 5 Pac. 119. 49 Am. Rep. 366

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INTERVENING DAMAGES

Such damages to an appellee as result from the delay caused by the appeal. McGregor v. Balch, 17 Vt. 508; Peasely v. Buckminster, 1 Tvler (Vt.) 207; Roberts v. Warner, 17 Vt. 40, 42 Am. Dec. 478.

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