Legal Articles

INTERNAL

Belating to the Interior j comprised within boundary lines; of interior concern or interest; domestic, as opposed to foreign.

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INTERRUPTION

The occurrence of some act or fact, during the period of pre- scription, which is sufficient to arrest the running of the statute of limitations. It is said to be either “natural” or “civil,” the former being caused by the act of the party; the latter by the legal effect or operation of some fact or circumstance. Innerarity v. Minis. 1 Ala. 674; Carr v. Foster, 3 Q. B. 588; Flight v. Thomas, 2 Adol. & El. 701. Interruption of the possession is where the right is not enjoyed or exercised continuously; interruption of the right is where the person having or claiming the right ceases the exercise of it in such a manner as to show that he does not claim to be entitled to exercise it. In Scotch law. The true proprietor’s claiming his right during the course of pre- scription. Bell.

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INTOXICATING LIQUOR

Any liquor used as a beverage, and which, when so used in sufficient quantities, ordinarily or commonly produces entire or partial intoxication; any liquor intended for use as a beverage or capable of being so used, which contains alcohol, either obtained by fermentation or by the additional process of distillation, in such proportion that it will produce intoxication when imbibed in such quantities as may practically be drunk. Intoxicating Liquor Cases, 25 Kan. 7G7, 37 Am. Rep. 284; Com’rs v. Taylor, 21 N. Y. 173; People v. Hawley, 3 Mich. 339; State v. Oliver, 20 V. Va. 431, 53 Am. Rep. 79; Sebastian v. State, 44 Tex. Cr. It. 508, 72 S. XV. 850; Worley v. Spurgeon, 38 Iowa, 405.

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INTRUDER

One who enters upon land without either right of possession or color of title. Miller v. McCullough, 104 Pa. 030; Itussel v. Chambers, 43 Ga. 479. In a more restricted sense, a stranger who, on the death of the ancestor, enters on the land, unlawfully, before the heir can enter.

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INVENTOR

One who finds out or contrives some new thing; one who devises some new art, manufacture, mechanical appliance, or process; one who invents a patentable contrivance. See Sparkman v. Higgins, 22 Fed. Cas. 879; Henderson v. Tompkins (C. C.) 60 Fed. 704

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IPSISSIMIS VERBIS

In the Identical words; opposed to “substantially.” Town- send v. Jeinison, 7 How. 710, 12 L. Ed. 8S0; Summons v. State, 5 Ohio St. 340. IPSO FACTO. By the fact itself; by the mere fact. By the mere effect of an act or a fact. In English ecclesiastical law. A censure of excommunication in the ecclesiastical court, immediately incurred for divers offenses, after lawful trial.

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IRRITANCY

In Scotch law. The happening of a condition or event by which a charter, contract, or other deed, to which a clause irritant is annexed, becomes void.

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ITINERA

Eyres, or circuits. 1 Reeve, Eng. Law, 52.

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INADEQUATE DAMAGES

Damages are called “inadequate,” within the rule that an injunction will not be granted where adequate damages at law could be recovered for the injury sought to be prevented, when such a recovery at law would not compensate the parties and place them in the position in which they formerly stood. Insurance Co. v. Bonner, 7 Colo. App. 97, 42 Pac. 081.

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IMAGINARY DAMAGES

This term is sometimes used as equivalent to “exemplary,” “vindictive,” or “punitive” damages. Murphy v. Hobbs, 7 Colo. 541, 5 Pac. 119. 49 Am. Rep. 366

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INTERVENING DAMAGES

Such damages to an appellee as result from the delay caused by the appeal. McGregor v. Balch, 17 Vt. 508; Peasely v. Buckminster, 1 Tvler (Vt.) 207; Roberts v. Warner, 17 Vt. 40, 42 Am. Dec. 478.

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