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HURTO

In Spanish law. Theft. White, New Recop. b. 2, tit. 20.

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HYEMS, HIEMS

Lit Iu the civil law. Winter. Dig. 43, 20, 4, 34. Written, in some ofthe old books, “yems.” Fleta, lib. 2, c. 73, S

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HYPOTHETICAL YEARLY TENANCY

The basis, in England, of rating lands andhereditaments to the poor-rate, and to other rates and taxes that are expressed to beleviable or assessable In like manner as the poor-rate.

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HABERE LICERE

Lat. In Roman law. To allow [one] to have [possession.] Thisphrase denoted the duty of the seller of property to allow the purchaser to have thepossession and enjoyment. For a breach of this duty, an actio ex empto might be maintained.

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HADD

In Hindu law. A boundary or limit. A statutory punishment defined by law,and not arbitrary. Mozley & Whitley

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HAGA

A house in a city or borough. Scott.

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HALYMOTE

A holy or ecclesiastical court.A court held in London before the lord mayor and sheriffs, for regulating the bakers.It was anciently held on Sunday next before St. Thomas’ day, and therefore called the “holymote,” or holy court. Cowell.

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HANDSALE

Anciently, among all the northern nations, shaking of hands was heldnecessary to bind a bargain,

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HARD LABOR

A punishment, additional to mere imprisonment, sometimes imposedupon convicts sentenced to a penitentiary. But the labor is not, as a rule, any harderthan ordinary mechanical labor. Brown v. State, 74 Ala. 4S3.

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HAUT CHEMIN

L. Fr. Highway. Yearb. M. 4 Hen. VI. 4.

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HEABRIGHT CERTIFICATE

In the laws of the republic of Texas, a certificate issued under authority of an act of 1939,which provided that every person immigrating to the republic between October 1, 1937, and January 1, 1940, who was the head of a family and actually resided within thegovernment with his or her family should be entitled to a grant of 010 acres of land, to be held under such a certificate for three years, and then conveyed by absolute deed to the settler, if in the mean time he had resided permanently within the republic and performed all the duties required of citizens. Cannon v. Vaughn n, 12 Tex. 401; Turner v. Hart, 10 Tex. 441.

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HEBBING-WEARS

A device for catching fish in ebbing water. St. 23 Hen. VIII. c. 5.

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HEIRS

A word used in deeds of conveyance, (either solely, or in connection withothers,) where it Is intended to pass a fee.

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HEORDWERCH

In Saxon law. The service of herdsmen, done at the will of their lord.

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HERDEWICH

A grange or place for cattle or husbandry. Mon. Angl. lit. 3.

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HERESCHIP

In old Scotch law. Theft or robbery. 1 Pitc. Crim. Tr. pt. 2, pp. 20, 89.

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HERITOR

In Scotch law. A proprietor of land. 1 Kames, Eq. Pref.

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HEUVELBOBH

Sax. In old English law. A surety, (ivarrantus.)

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HIGLER

In English law. A hawker or peddler. A person who carries from door todoor, and sells by retail, small articles of provisions, and the like.

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HIRST, HURST

In old English law. A wood. Co. Litt. 4&.

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