Legal Articles

DE FURTO

Of theft. One of the kinds of criminal appeal formerly in use in England. 2 Reeve, Eng. Law. 40.

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DE INTRUSIONS

A writ of intrusion; where a stranger entered after the death of the tenant, to the injury of the reversioner. Reg. Orig. 233b.

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DE MALO

Of Illness. This phrase was frequently used to designate several species
of essoin, (q. v.,) such as dc malo lecti, of illness in bed; de malo vcnicndi. of illness (or
misfortune) in coming to the place where the court sat; dc malo villcr. of illness in the
town where the court sat.

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DE NOTI OPERIS NUNCIATIONE

In the civil law. A form of interdict or injunction which lies in some cases where the
defendant is about to erect a “new work” (q. v.) in derogation or injury of the plaintiff’s
rights.

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DE PLACITO

Of a plea ; of or iu an action. Formal words used in declarations and other proceedings, as descriptive of the particular action brought.

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DE RECORDO ET PROCESSU MIT- TENDIS

Writ to send the record and process of a cause to a superior court; a species of writ of error. Reg. Orig. 209.

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DE SIMILIBUA AD SIMILIA EADEM RATIONE PROCEDENDUM EST

From like things to like things we are to proceed by the same rule or
reason, [i. e., we are allowed to argue from the analogy of cases.] Branch, Princ.

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DE VASTO

Writ of waste. A writ which might be brought by him who had the
immediate estate of inheritance in reversion or remainder, against the tenant for life, in
dower, by curtesy, or for years, where the latter had committed tcaste in
lands; calling upon the tenant to appear and show cause why he committed waste and
destruction in the place named, to tho disinherison (ad cxhwrcdationem) of the plaintiff.
Fitzh. Nat. Brev. 55, C; 3 Bl. Comm. 227, 228. Abolished by St. 3 & 4 Wm. IV. c. 27. 3
Steph. Comm. 506.

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DEADLY FEUD

In old European law. A profession of irreconcilable hatred till a person is revenged even by the death of his enemy.

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DEATH-BED DEED

In Scotch law. A deed made by a person while laboring under a distemper
of which he afterwards died. Ersk. Inst. .”., 8, 90. A deed is understood to be in
death-bed, if, before signing and delivery thereof. the grantor was sick, and never
convalesced thereafter. 1 Forbes, Inst. pt. 3, b. 2. c. 4. tit. 1,

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DEBITOR

In the civil and old English law. A debtor.

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DEBTOR’S SUMMONS

In English law. A summons issuing from a court having jurisdiction in bankruptcy. upon
the creditor proving a liquidated debt of not less than

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DECESSUS

In the civil and old English law. Death; departure.

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DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE

A formal declaration or announcement, promulgated July 4, 1776, by the congress of the United States of America, in the name and behalf of the people of the colonies, asserting and proclaiming their independence of the British
crown, vindicating their pretensions to political autonomy, and announcing themselves
to the world as a free and independent nation.

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DECLINATOIRES

In French law. Pleas to the jurisdiction of the court; also of lis pendens, and of connexili, (q. v.)

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DECREET

In Scotch law. The final Judgment or sentence of a court

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DECROWNING

The act of depriving of a crown.

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DEED IN FEE

A deed conveying the title to land in fee simple with the usual covenants.
Itudd v. Savelli, 44 Ark. 152; Moody v. Railway Co., 5 Wash. 099, 32 Pac. 751.

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