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CURATOR AD HOC

In the civil law. A guardian for this purpose; a special guardian.

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CNRIA MAGNA

In old English law. The great court; one of the ancient names of parliament.

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CURRENT FUNDS

This phrase means gold or silver, or something equivalent thereto, and convertible at pleasure into coined money. Bull v. Bank. 123 U. S. 105, 8 Sup. Ct. 02. 31 L. Ed. 97; Lacy v. llolbrook. 4 Ala. 90; Haddock v. Woods, 40 Iowa, 433.

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CURTILAGE

The enclosed space of ground and buildings immediately surrounding a dwelling-house. In its most comprehensive and proper legal signification, it includes all that space of ground and buildings thereon which is usually enclosed within the general fence immediately surrounding a principal messuage and outbuildings, and yard closely adjoining to a dwelling-house, but it may be large enough for cattle to be levant and couchant therein. 1 Chit. Gen. Pr. 175. The curtilage of a dwelling-house is a space, necessary and convenient and habitually used for the family purposes, and the carrying on of domestic employments. It includes the garden, if there be one, and it need not be separated from other lands by fence. State v. Shaw, 31 Me. 523; Com. v. Rarney, 10 Cush. (Mass.) 480; Derrickson v. Edwards, 29 N. J. Law, 474. SO Am. Dec. 220. The curtilage is the court-yard in the front or rear of a house, or at its side, or any piece of ground lying near, enclosed and used with, the house, and necessary for the convenient occupation of the house. People v. Geduey, 10 Ilun (X. Y.) 154. In Michigan, the meaning of curtilage has been extended to include more than an enclosure near the house. People v. Taylor, 2 Mich. 250.

TLD Example: The defendant claimed the search by police violated his Fourth Amendment rights because the evidence seized was within the curtilage of the home.

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CUSTOM OF YORK

A custom of intestacy in the province of York similar to that of London. Abolished by 19 & 20 Vict. c. 94.

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CUSTOS HORREI REGII

Protector of the royal granary. 2 Bl. Comm. 394.

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CYCLE

A measure of time; a space In which the same revolutions begin again; a periodical space of time. Enc. Lond.

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CONTINUING DAMAGES

are such as accrue from the same injury, or from the repetition of similar acts, between two specified periods of time.

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CUMULATIVE

Additional; heaping up; Increasing; forming an aggregate. The word signifies that two things are to be added together, instead of one being a repetition or in substitution of the other. People v. Superior Court, 10 Wend. (N. Y.) 285; Regina v. Eastern Archipelago Co., 18 Eng. Law & Eq. 183.

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CURATOR AD LITEM

Guardian for the suit. In English law, the corresponding phrase is “guardian ad litem.”

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