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WAGES

The compensation agreed upon by a master to be paid to a servant, or any other person hired to do work or business for him. In maritime law. The compensation allowed to seamen for their services on board a vessel during a voyage. In political economy. The reward paid, whether in money or goods, to human exer- tion, considered as a factor in the production of wealth, for its co-operation in the process. "Three factors contribute to the production of commodities,

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WAGES EXPENSE

Account used by the company to pay the employees wages.

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WAGES PAYABLE

Account used by the company to record compensation for their employees before they are distributed.

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WAGNER ACT

the name given to a National Labour Relations Act that gives workers to right to form unions and to collectively bargain with employers.

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WAGON

A common vehicle for the transportation of goods, wares, and merchandise of all descriptions. The term does not include a hackney-coach. Quigley v. Gorham, 5 Cal. 418, 63 Am. Dec. 139.

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WAIF

Waifs are goods found, but claimed by nobody; that of which every one waives the claim. Also, goods stolen and waived, or thrown away by the thief in his flight, for fear of being apprehended. Wharton. Waifs are to be distinguished from bona fugitiva, which are the goods of the felon himself, which he abandons in his flight from Justice. Brown. See People v. Kaatz, 3 Parker, Cr. It. (N. Y.) 138; Hall r. Gilder- sleeve, 36 N. J. Law, 237.

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WAIN-BOTE

In feudal and old English law. Timber for wagons or carts. WAINABLE 1216 WALL

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WAINAGE

In old English law. The _ team and instruments of husbandry belong- (J ing to a countryman, and especially to a villein who was required to perform agricultural services.

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WAINAGIUM

What is necessary to the P farmer for the cultivation of his land. Bar- ring. Ob. St. 12.

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WAITING CLERKS

Officers whose duty it formerly was to wait in attendance Qupon the court of chancery. The ollice was abolished in 1S42 by SL 5 & 0 Vict. c. 103. Mozley & Whitley.

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WAITING PERIOD

Period of time between filing a statement of registration and its effective date.

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WAITING TIME

Period in a job where an employee is unable to work because of factors he has no control over.. Also known as allowed time, idle time, downtime.

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WAIVE

This means to relinquish or to give up a right, benefit or privilege and implies that the person knows what he is doing.

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WAIVE, n

A woman outlawed. The term is, as it were, the feminine of "outlaw," tlie latter being always applied to a man; "waive," to a woman. Cowell.

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WAIVE, v

To abandon or throw away; Ras when a thief, in his flight, throws aside the stolen goods, in order to facilitate his escape, he is technically said to waive them. In modern law, to renounce, repudiate, or surrender a claim, a privilege, a right, or the opportunity to take advantage of some defect, C irregularity, or wrong. A person is said to waive a benefit when he renounces or disclaims it, and he is said to waive a tort or Injury when he abandons the remedy which the law gives him for it j Sweet.

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WAIVER

The renunciation, repudiation, abandonment, or surrender of some claim, right, privilege, or of the opportunity to take advantage of some select, irregular- Vity, or wrong. The passing by of an occasion to enforce a legal right, whereby the right to enforce the same is lost; a common instance of this is where a landlord waives a forfeiture of a lease by receiving rent, or distraining for M rent, which has accrued due after the breach of covenant causing the forfeiture became known to him. Wharton. This word is commonly used to denote the declining to take advantage of an irregularity in legal proceedings, or of a forfeiture incurred through breach of covenants in a lease. A gift of goods may be waived by a disagreement to accept; so a plaintiff may commonly sue in contract waiving the tort Brown. See Bennecke v. Insurance Co., 105 U. S. 355, 20 L. Ed. 990; Christensen v. Carleton, 69 Vt 91. 37 Atl. 226; Shaw v. Spencer, 100 Mass. 395, 97 Am. Dec. 107, 1 Am. Bep. 115; Star Brewery Co. v. Primas, 103 111. 652, 45 N. E. 145; Reid v. Field, 83 Va. 26, 1 S. E. 395; Caulfield v. Finnegan, 114 Ala. 39, 21 South. 484; Lyman v. Little ton, 50 N. H. 54; Smiley v. Barker, 83 Fed. 684, 28 C. C. A. 9; Boos v. Ewiug, 17 Ohio, 523, 49 Am. Dec. 478.

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WAIVER EXPRESS

a term that applies to the intentional giving up of a known right.

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WAIVER IMPLIED

the intention to give up a right, benefit or a privilege by conduct that a waiver will be given.

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WAIVER OF COINSURANCE

Clause saying co-insurance need will not be considered.

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WAIVER OF EXEMPTION

the giving up intentionally by a debtor his right to exempt property from claims of a creditor.

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