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SABIN

The imperial measurement of sound absorption. One sabin is equal to the power of absorption of one foot squared of a perfect sound absorption material placed in an open window.

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SABINIANS

A school or sect of Roman jurists, under the early empire, founded by Ateius Capito, who was succeeded by M. Sabinus, from whom the name.

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SABLE

The heraldic term for black. It is called "Saturn," by those who blazon by planets, and "diamond," by those who use the names of jewels. Engravers commonly represent it by numerous perpendicular and horizontal lines, crossing each other. Wharton.

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SABOTAGE

The intentional and deliberate destruction of property or the obstruction of an activity.

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SABTJBBA

L. Lat In old maritime law. Ballast

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SAC

In old English law. A liberty of holding pleas; the jurisdiction of a manor court; the privilege claimed by a lord of trying actions of trespass between his tenants, in his manor court, and imposing fines and amerciaments in the same.

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SACABURTH, SACABERE, SAKA- BERE

In old English law. He that is robbed, or by theft deprived of his money or goods, and puts in surety to prosecute the felon with fresh suit Bract, fol. 1546.

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SACCABOR

In old Egnlish law. The person from whom a thing had been stolen, and by whom the thief was freshly pursued. Bract, fol. 1546. See SACABUBTH.

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SACCULARII

Lat. In Boman law. Cutpurses. 4 Steph. Comm. 125.

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SACCUS

L. Lat. In old English law. A sack. A quantity of wool weighing thirty or twenty-eight stone. Fleta, 1. 2, c. 79,

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SACCUS CUM BROCHIA

L. Lat In old English law. A service or tenure of finding a sack and a broach (pitcher) to the sovereign for the use of the army. Bract 1. 2, c. 16.

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SACK

A unit of cement from Portland that is 94 pounds in the USA and 87.5 pounds in Canada.

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SACQUIER

In maritime law. The name of an ancient officer, whose business was to load and unload vessels laden with salt, corn, or fish, to prevent the ship's crew defrauding the merchant by false tale, or cheating him of his merchandise otherwise. Laws Oleron, art 11; 1 Pet Adm. Append. 25.

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SACRA

Lat. In Roman law. The right to participate in the sacred rites of the city. Butl. Hor. Jur. 27.

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SACRAMENTALES

L. Lat. In feudal law. Compurgators; persons who came to purge a defendant by their oath that they believed him innocent

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SACRAMENTI ACTIO

Lat In the older practice of the Roman law, this was one of the forms of legis actio, consisting in the deposit of a stake or juridical wager. See SACRAMENTUM.

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SACRAMENTUM

Lat. In Roman law. An oath, as being a very sacred thing; more particularly, the oath taken by soldiers to be true to their general and their country. Alnsw. Lex. In one of the formal methods of beginning an action at law (legis actiones) known to the early Roman jurisprudence, the sacramentum was a sum of money deposited in court by each of the litigating parties, as a kind of wager or forfeit to abide the re- 8ACRAMENTUM 1051

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SACRILEGE

In English criminal law. Larceny from a church. 4 Steph. Comm. 164. The crime of breaking a church or chapel, and stealing therein. 1 Russ. Crimes, S43. In old English law. The desecration of anything considered holy; the alienation to lay-men or to profane or common purposes of what was given to religious persons and to pious uses. Cowell.

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SACRILEGIUM

Lat. In the civil law. The stealing of sacred things, or things dedi- cated to sacred uses; the taking of things out of a holy place. Calvin.

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SACRILEGUS

Lat. In the civil and common law. A sacrilegious person; one guilty of sacrilege. Sacrilegus omnium prsedonum cupi- ditatem et scelera superat. 4 Coke, 106. A sacrilegious person transcends the cupidity and wickedness of all other robbers.

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