Archive | Q RSS feed for this section

QU&2STA

An indulgence or remission of penance, sold by the pope.

Comments are closed

QUA

Lat. Considered as; in the character or capacity of. For example, "the trustee qua trustee [that is, in his character as trusteel is not liable," etc.

Comments are closed

QUACK

A pretender to medical skill which he does not possess; one who practices as a physician or surgeon without adequate preparation or due qualification. See El- mergreen v. Horn, 115 Wis. 385, 91 N. W. 973.

Comments are closed

QUACUNQUE VIA DATA

Lat. Whichever way you take it.

Comments are closed

QUAD

1. A room that can accomodate four persons. 2. This applies to a unit of electricity that has a quadrillion or 1015 BTUs. It will last around 293 terra watt hours for powering electrical items.

Comments are closed

QUAD RATE

The rate of a hotel room that is suitable for four people. It applies to any room or unit that will accomodate four persons.

Comments are closed

QUADRAGESIMA

Lat. The fortieth. The first Sunday in Lent is so called because it is about the fortieth day before Easter. Cowell.

Comments are closed

QUADRAGESIMALS

Offerings formerly made, on Mid-Lent Sunday, to the mother church.

Comments are closed

QUADRAGESMS

The third volume of the year books of the reign of Edward III. So called because beginning with the fortieth year of that sovereign's reign. Crabb, Eng. Law, 327.

Comments are closed

QUADRANS

Lat. In Roman law. The fourth part; the quarter of any number. measure, or quantity. Hence an heir to the fourth part of the inheritance was called "hwres ex quadrante." Also a Roman coin, being the fourth part of an as, equal In value to an English half-penny. In old English law. A farthing; a fourth part or quarter of a penny.

Comments are closed

QUADRANT

An angular measure of ninety degrees.

Comments are closed

QUADRANTATA TERRiE

In old English law. A measure of land, variously described as a quarter of an acre or the fourth part of a yard-land.

Comments are closed

QUADRARIUM

In old records. A stone-pit or quarry. Cowell.

Comments are closed

QUADRIENNIUM

Lat. In the civil law. The four-years course of study required to be pursued by law-students before they were qualified to study the Code or collection of imperial constitutions. See Inst proem.

Comments are closed

QUADRIENNIUM UTILE

In Scotch law. The term of four years allowed to a minor, after his majority, iu which he may by suit or action endeavor to annul any deed to his prejudice, grauted during his minority. Bell.

Comments are closed

QUADRIPARTITE

Divided into four parts. A term applied in conveyancing to an indenture executed in four parts.

Comments are closed

QUADROON

A person who is descended from a white person and another person who has an equal mixture of the European and African blood. State v. Davis, 2 Bailey (S. C.) 558.

Comments are closed

QUADRUPLATORES

Lat. In Roman law. Informers who, if their information were followed by conviction, had the fourth part of the confiscated goods for their trouble.

Comments are closed

QUADRUPLE INDEMNITY

More than double indemnity in insurance cases. Often known as multiple indemnity.

Comments are closed

QUADRUPLICATE

Lat. In the civil law. A pleading on the part of a defendant corresponding to the rebutter at common law. The third pleading on the part of the defendant. Inst. 4, 14, 3; 3 Rl. Comm. 310. Qua; ab hostibus capinntur, statim ca- picntium fiunt. 2 Burrows, 093. Things which are taken from enemies immediately become the property of the captors. Quae ab initio inntilis fuit institutio, ex post facto convalescere non potest. An institution which was at the beginning of no use or force cannot acquire force from after matter. Dig. 50, 17, 210. Quae ab initio non valent, ex post facto convalcscere non possnnt. Things invalid from the beginning cannot be made valid by subsequent act. Tray. Lat. Max. 482. Quae accessionum locum obtinent, ex- tinguuntur cum principales res peremp- tse fuerint. Things which hold the place of accessories are extinguished when the principal things are destroyed. 2 Poth. Obi. 202; Broom, Max. 496. QU.33 AD UNUM FINEM 971 QU.

Comments are closed