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OB TURPEM CAUSAM

For an immoral consideration. Dig. 12, 5.

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OBEDIENCE

Compliance with a command. prohibition, or known law and rule of duty prescribed; the performance of what is required or enjoined by authority, or the abstaining from what is prohibited, in compliance with the command or prohibition. Webster.

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OBEDIENTIA

An office, or the administration of it; a kind of rent; submission; obedience. Obedientia est legis essentia. 11 Coke, 100. Obedience is the essence of law.

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OBEDIENTIARIUS

A monastic officer. Du Cange.

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OBiERATUS

Lat. In Roman law. A debtor who was obliged to serve his creditor till his debt was discharged. Adams, Rom. Ant. 49.

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OBIT

In old English law. A funeral solemnity, or office for the dead. Cowell. The anniversary of a person's death ; the anniversary office. Cro. Jac. 51.

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OBIT SINE PROLE

Lat. [lie] died without issue. Yearb. M. 1 Edw. II. 1

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OBITER

Lat. By the way; in passing; incidentally; collaterally.

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OBITER DICTUM

A latin term meaning said in passing, it is a judge's statement that is based on some established facts, but does not affect the judgement.

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OBJECT

1. Accounting: The goods or services that was purchased. 2. Modeling: The modeling arhitecture's portrayal of a real world situation through a representation. 3. Programming: A program that consists of data and code, which is reusable in other programs.

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OBJECT CODE

Code that is outputed by the compiler program. Similar to the machine code sometimes, it is usually in a form that requires translation by another program.

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OBJECT COST

The total sum of direct and indirect costs to the manufacturer on a product or service provided.

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OBJECT LINKING AND EMBEDDING (OLE)

A technology developed by Microsoft that allows for information from different media to be inserted into another file through two methods. (1) Linking: The files involved are separate, But through a link, an update in the primary file results in an automatic update in the secondary source. (2) Embedding: Two files combine to create a single file but the individual properties of the objects are unchanged or unaffected. To modify them requires the user to doubleclick on the object and then bring up the application that was originally used to create them.

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OBJECT OF A STATUTE

the term given to the purpose of the law or what a law is supposed to accomplish.

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OBJECT OF AN ACTION

the term that describes the purpoose of a suit.

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OBJECT ORIENTED

An operating system that utilizes objects in its user interface or programming language.

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OBJECT ORIENTED ARCHITECTURE

The ease of manipulation granted by this design method is possible through the representation of files and other operations as data structures.

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OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING (OOP)

a programming ideology that views programs as a combination of objects, which are capable of exchanging information between one another, and can be easily combined to form modules or blocks. An object is encapsulated , that is it contains information regarding itself, and has a property called Inheritance through which it is able to interact with other objects. Thus, each object is independent and can lock itself with other objects. Such features are seen in languages such as Java and C++.

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OBJECT, v

In legal proceedings, to object (e. ff., to the admission of evidence) is to interpose a declaration to the effect that the particular matter or thing under considera- tion is not done or admitted with the consent of the party objecting, but is by him considered improper or illegal, and referring the question of its propriety or legality to the court. OBJECT, n. This term "includes whatever is presented to the mind, as well as what may be presented to the senses; whatever, also, is acted upon, or operated upon, af- firmatively, or intentionally influenced by anything done, moved, or applied thereto." Woodruff, J., Wells v. Shook, S Blatclif. 257, Fed. Cas. No. 17,400.

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OBJECTION

The act of a party who objects to some matter or proceeding in the course of a trial, (see OBJECT, V.:) or an argument or reason urged by him in support of his contention that the matter or proceeding objected to is improper or illegal.

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