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N

An abbreviation of “Novella),” the Novels of Justinian, used in citing them. Tayl. Civil Law, 24. In English, a common and familiar abbreviation for the word “north,” as used in maps, charts, conveyances, etc. See Burr v. Broadway Ins. Co., 16 N. Y. 271.

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N A

An abbreviation for “non allocatur,” it is not allowed.

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N B

An abbreviation for “nota bene,” mark well, observe; also “nulla bona,” no goods.

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N D

An abbreviation for “Northern District.”

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N E I

An abbreviation for “non est inventus,” he is not found.

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N L

An abbreviation of “non liquet,” (which see.)

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N P

An abbreviation for “notary public,” (Rowley v. Berrlan, 12 111. 200;) also for “nisi prius,” (q. v.)

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N R

An abbreviation for “New Reports ;” also for “not reported,” and for “nonresident.”

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N S

An abbreviation for “New Series;” also for “New Style.”

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N USURPATIO

Lat. In the civil law. 1′he interruption of a usucaption, by some act on the part of the real owner. Calvin.

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N VOUCHER

A receipt, acquittance, or release, which may serve as evidence of pay- ment or discharge of a debt, or to certify the correctness of accounts. An account- book containing the acquittances or receipts showing the accountant’s discharge of his obligations. Q Whitwell v. Willard, 1 Mete. (Mass.) 218. The term “voucher,” when used in connection with the disbursements of moneys, implies some written or printed instrument in the nature of a receipt, note, account, bill of particulars, or something of that character which shows on Pwhat account or by what authority a particular payment has been made, and which may be kept or filed away by the party receiving it, for his own convenience or protection, or that of the public. People v. Swigert, 107 111. 504. In old conveyancing. The person on Qwhom the tenant calls to defend the title to the land, because he warranted the title to him at the time of the original purchase.

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N WAINABLE

Ill old records. That may lie plowed or manured; tillable. Cowell; Blount.

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n WETHER

A castrated ram, at least one ? year old. In an indictment it may be called a”sheep.” Rex v. Birket, 4 Car. & P. 216.

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NAAM

Sax. The attaching or taking of movable goods and chattels, called “vif” or “mort” according as the chattels were living or dead. Termes de la Ley.

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NABOB

Originally the governor of a province under the Mogul government of Hin- dostan, whence it became a mere title of any man of high rank, upon whom it was con- ferred without any ollice being attached to it. Wils. Indian Gloss.

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NAFTA

the abbreviation that is for the North American Free Trade Agreement.

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NAIF

L. Fr. A villein ; a born slave; a bondwoman.

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NAIL

A lineal measure of two inches and a quarter.

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NAIVE FORECASTING

Without adjusting or establishing causal factors, using the last period’s actuals to estimate this period’s forecast by this unremarkable technique. Used only to compare against forecasts generated by better, more sophisticated techniques.

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NAKED

As a term of jurisprudence, this word is equivalent to bare, wanting in nec- essary conditions, incomplete, as a naked con- trad. (mulum pactum,) i. e., a contract devoid of consideration, and therefore invalid; or simple, unilateral, comprising but a single element, as a naked authority, i. e., one which is not coupled with any interest in the agent, but subsists for the benefit of the principal alone. As to naked “Confession,” “Deposit,” “Possession,” “Possibility,” “Power,” “Promise,” and “Trust,” see those titles.

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