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LUPINUM CAPUT GERERE

Lat. To be outlawed, and have one's head exposed, like a wolf's, with a reward to him who should take it. Cowell.

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LURGULARY

Casting any corrupt or poisonous thing into the water. Wharton.

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LUSHBOROW

In old English law.A base sort of money, coined beyond sea in the likeness of English coin, and introduced into England in the reign of Edward III. Pro- hibited by St. 25 Edw. III. c. 4. Spelman; Cowell. LUXURY 742 LYTYE

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LUSIIBOROW

and in excess of the expenses incidental to the oilice. See Slate v. Kirk, 44 Ind. 405. 15 Am. Rep. 230; Dailey v. State. 8 Blackf. (ind.) 330; Crawford v. Dunbar, 52 Cal. 39; State v. De Gress, 53 Tex. 40(1.

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LUSOPHONE COUNTRIES

Angola, Brazil, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, Mozambique, Portugal, and SaoTome and Principe are countries where Portuguese is the common language.

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LUX (LX)

Surface illuminance metric (SI) unit. Defined as an illumination of one lumen per square meter. In contrast, sunshine gives 80,000 to 100,000 lux to the surface it hits. Also refer to luminance and candela.

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LUXURY

Excess and extravagance which was formerly an offense against the public economy, but is not now punishable. Wharton.

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LUXURY CLASS

A level above travel class. Most pricey accommodations.

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LXTARE JERUSALEM

Easter offerings, so called from these words in the hymn of the day. They are also denominated "quadragesimalia." Wharton.

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LYCH-GATE

The gate into a churchyard, with a roof or awning hung on posts over it to cover the body brought for burial, when it rests underneath. Wharton.

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LYEF-GELD

Sax. In old records. Lief silver or money; a small fine paid by the customary tenant to the lord for leave to plow or sow, etc. Somn. Gavelkind, 27.

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LYING BY

A person who, by his presence and silence at a transaction which affects his interests, may be fairly supposed to acquiesce in it, if he afterwards propose to disturb the arrangement, is said to lie prevented from doing so by reason that he has been lying by.

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LYING IN FRANCHISE

A term descriptive of waifs, wrecks, estrays, and the like, which may be seized without suit or action.

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LYING IN GRANT

A phrase applied to incorporeal rights, incapable of manual tra- dition, and which must pass by mere delivery of a deed.

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LYING IN WAIT

Lying In ambush; lying hid or concealed for the purpose of making a suddeu and unexpected attack upon a person when he shall arrive at the scene. In some jurisdictions, where there are several degrees of murder, lying in wait is made evidence of that deliberation and premeditat ed intent which is necessary to characterize murder in the first degree. This term is not synonymous with "concealed." If a person conceals himself for the purpose of shooting another unawares, he is lying iu wait; but a person may, while con- cealed, shoot another without committing the crime of murder. People v. Miles. 55 Cal. 207.

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LYNCH LAW

A term descriptive of the action of unofficial persons, organized bands, or mobs, who seize persons charged with or suspected of crimes, or take them out of the custody of the law, and inflict summary punishment upon them, without legal trial, and without the warrant or authority of law. See State v. Aler, 39 W. Va. 549, 20 S. E. 585; Bates' Ann. St. Ohio. 1904.

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LYNDHURST'S (LORD) ACT

This statute (5 & 6 Wm. IV. c. 54) renders marriages within the prohibited degrees absolutely null and void. Theretofore such marriages were voidable merely.

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LYON KING OF ARMS

In Scotch law. The ancient duty of this officer was to carry public messages to foreign states, and it Is still the practice of the heralds to make all royal proclamations at the Cross of Edinburgh. The officers serving under him are heralds, pursuivants, and messengers. Bell.

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LYTffi

In old Roman law. A name given to students of the civil law in the fourth year of their course, from their being supposed capable of solving any difficulty in law. Tayl. Civil Law, 39. M 743

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LZESIONE FIDEL, SUITS PRO

Suits in the ecclesiastical courts for spiritual offenses against conscience, for non-payment of debts, or breaches of civil contracts. This attempt to turn the ecclesiastical courts into courts of equity was checked by the consti- tutions of Clarendon, A. D. 1104. 3 Bl. Comm. 52.

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