Archive | L RSS feed for this section

LIEFTENANT

An old form of "lieutenant," and still retained as the vulgar pro- nunciation of the word.

Comments are closed

LIEGE

In feudal law. Bound by a feudal tenure; bound iu allegiance to the lord paramount, who owned no superior. In old records. Full; absolute; perfect; pure. Liege widowhood was pure widowhood. Cowell.

Comments are closed

LIEGEMAN

ne that oweth allegiance. Cowell.

Comments are closed

LIEGER, or LEGER

A resident ambassador.

Comments are closed

LIEGES, or LIEGE PEOPLE

Subjects.

Comments are closed

LIEN

A qualified right of property which a creditor has in or over specific property of his debtor, as security for the debt or charge or for performance of some act. In every ease in which property, either real or personal, is charged with the payment of a debt or duty, every such charge may be denominated a lien on the property. Whitak. Liens, p. 1. A lien is a charge imposed upon specific property, by which it is made security for the performance of an act Code Civil Proc. Cal.

Comments are closed

LIEN CREDITOR

See LIEN.

Comments are closed

LIEN ON EMPLOYMENT

An employment privilege given by employers to employees. If given it assures the employee that the employer will hold the employee's job while absent. Not guaranteed by most employers. The employee must provide solid justification for being absent, especially if the employee is gone for more than the agreed-to time. Also known as lien on appointment.

Comments are closed

LIEN PLAN

An insurance coverage type rarely issued for a substandard risk. If the insured dies before a certain time, less than the full policy benefit is paid out.

Comments are closed

LIEN WAIVER

Before the general contractor can receive money, a mechanic's lien rights waiver is sometimes required under a construction loan's contract payment provisions.

Comments are closed

LIENEE

Debtor or party whose assets or property is held by lien by a creditor, claimant, or 'lienor'.

Comments are closed

Lienholder

A bank, person, or other entity having a financial interest (such as a loan) in a vehicle.

Comments are closed

LIENOR

The person having or owning a lien; one who has a right of lien upon prop- erty of another.

Comments are closed

LiESA MAJESTAS

Lat Leze-majes- ty, or injured majesty; high treason. It is a phrase taken from the civil law. and anciently meant any offense against the king's person or dignity.

Comments are closed

LIEU

Fr. Place; room. It is only used with "in;" in lieu, instead of. Enc. Lond.

Comments are closed

LIEU CONUS

L. Fr. In old pleading. A known place; a place well known and generally taken notice of by those who dwell about it, as a castle, a manor, etc. Whishaw; 1 Ld. Rayin. 259.

Comments are closed

LIEU DAYS

To compensate for unpaid overtime, working days given as offdays.

Comments are closed

LIEUTENANCY, COMMISSION OF

See COMMISSION OF ARRAY.

Comments are closed

LIEUTENANT

any debt or d_ity; every such claim or charge remaining a lieu on the property, although not in the possession of the person' to whom the debt or duty is due. Downer v. Brackett, 21 Vt. 002, l-'eil. Cas. No. 4,043. And see Trust v. Pirsson, 1 Ililt. (N. Y.) 200; In re Byrne (D. C.) 07 Fed. 704; Storm v. Waddell. 2 Sandf. Ch. (N. Y.) 507; Stansbury v. Patent Cloth Mfg. Co., 5 N. J. Law, 441; The Meno- ininie (D. C.) 30 Fed. 199; Mobile B. & L. Ass'n v. Robertson, 05 Ala. 382; The J. E. Iiumbell, 148 U. S. 1, 13 Sup. Ct. 498, 37 L. Ed. 345. In the Scotch law, the doctrine of lien is known by the name of "retention," and that of set-off by the name of "compensation." The Roman or civil law embraces under the head of "mortgage and privilege" the peculiar securities which, in the common and maritime law and equity, are termed "liens." Classification. Liens are either particular or general. The former is a right to retain a tiling for some charge or claim growing out of, or connected with, the identical thing. A general lien is a right to detain a chattel, etc., until payment be made, not only of any debt due in respect of the particular chattel, but of any balance that may be due on general account in the same line of business. A general lien, being against the ordinary rule of law, depends entirely upon contract, express or implied, from the special usage of dealing between the parties. Wharton. Crommelin v. Railroad Co., 10 Bosw. (N. Y.) 80; McKenzie v. Nevius, 22 Me. 150, 38 Am. Dec. 291 ; Brooks v. Bryce, 21 Wend. (N. Y.) 10. A spccial lien is in the nature of a particular lien, being a lien upon particular property; a lien which the holder can enforce only as security for the performance of a particular act or obligation and of obligations incidental thereto. Green v. Coast Line It. Co., 97 Ga. 15, 24 S. E 814, 33 L. R. A. 800. 54 Am. St. Rep. 379; Civ. Code Cal. 1903,

Comments are closed

LIFE

That state of animals and plants, or of an organized being, in which its natural functions and motions are performed, or in which its organs are capable of performing their functions. Webster. The sum of the forces by which death is resisted. Richat.

Comments are closed