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KARRATA

In old records. A cart-load. Cowell; Blount

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KAST

In Swedish law. Jettison; a literal translation of the Latin "jactus."

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KATATONIA

See INSANITY.

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KAY

A quay, or key.

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KAZY

A Mohammedan judge or magistrate in the East Indies, appointed originally by the court at Delhi, to administer justice according to their written law. Under the British authorities their judicial functions ceased, and their duties were confined to the preparation and attestation of deeds, and the superintendence and legalization of marriage and other ceremonies among the Mohammedans. Wharton.

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KDE

K Desktop Environment. KDE was a project begun by Matthias Ettrich in 1996. It was developed mainly by European volunteers. It is a Linux-based non-proprietary graphical user interface (GUI). It works with other UNIX and UNIX-type operating systems. An open source license typically comes with it for free .

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KEELAGE

The right to demand money for the privilege of anchoring a vessel in a harbor; also the money so paid.

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KEELHALE, KEELHAUL

To drag a person under the keel of a ship by means of ropes from the yard-arms, a punishment formerly practiced in the British navy. Enc. Lond.

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KEELS

This word is applied, in England, to vessels employed in the carriage of coals. Jacob KEEP, n. A strong tower or hold in the middle of any castle or fortification, wherein the besieged make their last efforts of defense, was formerly, in England, called a "keep;" and the inner pile within the castle of Dover, erected by King Henry II. about the year 1153, was termed the "King's Keep;" so at Windsor, etc. It seems to be some- thing of the same nature with what Is called abroad a "citadel." Jacob. KEEP, v. 1. To retain In one's power or possession; not to lose or part with ; to pre- serve or retain. Benson v. New York, 10 Barb. (N. Y.) 235; Deans v. Gay, 132 N. C. 227, 43 S. E. G43.2. To maintain, carry on, conduct, or manage; as, to "keep" a liquor saloon, bawdy house, gaming table, nuisance, inn, or hotel. State v. Irvin, 117 Iowa, 400, 91 N. W. 700; People v. Rice, 103 Mich. 350, 01 N. W. 540; State v. Miller, 6S Conn. 373, 30 Atl. 795; State v. Cox, 52 Vt. 474. 3. To maintain, tend, harbor, feed, and shelter; as, to "keep" a dangerous.animal, to "keep" a horse at livery. Allen v. Ham, 03 Me. 536; Skinner v. Caughey, 64 Minn. 375, 67 N. W. 203. 4. To maintain continuously and methodically for the purposes of a record; as, to KEEP 6 "keep" books. See Backus v. Richardson, 5 Johns. (N. Y.) 483. 5. To maintain continuously and -without stoppage or variation; as, when a vessel is said to "keep her course," that is, continue in motion in the same general direction in which she was previously sailing. See The Britannia, 153 U. S. 130, 14 Sup. Ct 795, 38 L. Ed. 660.

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KEEP

a term meaning to hold, to maintain, to support, to retain in possession and to take care of.

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KEEP IN REPAIR

a clause found in leases that binds the lessee to keep the premises in a good condition.

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KEEPER

A custodian, manager, or superintendent; one who has the care, custody, or management of any thing or place. Schultz v. State, 32 Ohio St. 281; State v. Ilozum, 8 N. D. 548, 80 N. W. 481 ; Fishell v. Morris, 57 Conn. 547, 18 Atl. 717, 6 L. R. A. 82; McCoy v. Zane, 65 Mo. 15; Stevens v. People, 67 111. 590.

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KEEPING THE PEACE

the term that means to maintain public order and to prevent violence and other unlawful behaviour.

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KEEPWELL AGREEMENT

A parent company and a subsidiary imitate such a contract to guarantee the subsidiary all necessary financing over a specified time-period. The parent company provides this. This contracted support gives potential lenders greater confidence, making the subsidiary more creditworthy.

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KEIRETSU

A group of companies who have a shared interest but are not organized into a central company. Refer to Chaebol.

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KELLER PLAN

Learning material presented in small units of personalized instruction. Behavioral psychologist Fred Keller, developed this approach, which bears his name. Instructors only facilitate, grade as pass or fail, administer no punishment at any learning stage. A student takes a test on the completed unit when the student feels ready to do so. Depending on the result, other units are given at the student's pace.

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KELVIN (K)

Irish physicist William Thomson (1824-1907),honored as 1st Baron Kelvin (Lord William Kelvin), developed this scale. Temperature scale beginning at absolute zero (273.15

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KENILWORTH EDICT

An edict or award between Henry III. and those who had been in arms against him; so called because made at Kenilworth Castle, in War- wickshire, anno 51 Hen. III., A. D. 1260. It coutained a composition of those who had forfeited their estates in that rebellion, which composition was five years' rent of the es- tates forfeited. Wharton.

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KENNING TO A TERCE

In Scotch law. The act of the sheriff in ascertaining the just proportion of the husband's lauds which belong to the widow in right of her terce or dower. Bell.

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KENTLAGE

In maritime law. A permanent ballast, consisting usually of pigs of iron, cast in a particular form, or other weighty material, which, on account of its superior cleanliness, and the small space occupied by it, is frequently preferred to ordinary ballast Abb. Shipp. 5.

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