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AESTIMATIO PRAETERITI DELICTI EX POST- REMO FACTO NUNQUAM CRESCIT

The weight of a past offense is never increased by a subsequent fact. Bacon.

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JAC

An abbreviation for “Jacobus,” the Latin form of the name James; used princi- pally in citing statutes enacted in the reigns of the English kings of that name; e. g., “St. 1 Jac. II.” Used also in citing the second part of Croke’s reports; thus, “Cro. Jac.” denotes “Croke’s reiiorts of cases In the time of James I.”

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JACENS

Lat. Lying in abeyance, as in the phrase “hmreditas jaccns,” which is an inheritance or estate lying vacant or in abeyance prior to the ascertainment of the heir or his assumption of the succession.

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JACET IN ORE

Lat. In old English law. It lies in the mouth. Fleta, lib. 5, c. 5,

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JACK

A kind of defensive coat-armor worn by horsemen in war; not made of solid iron, but of many plates fastened together. Some tenants were bound by their tenure to find it upon invasion. Cowell.

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JACOBUS

A gold coin worth 24s., so called from James I., who was king when it was struck. Enc. Loud.

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JACTITATION

A false boasting; a false claim; assertions repeated to the prejudice of another’s right. The species of defamation or disparagement of another’s title to real estate known at common law as “slander of title” comes under the head of jactitation, and in some jurisdictions (as in Louisiana) a remedy for this injury is provided under the name of an “action of jactitation.”

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JACTITATION OF TITLE

the term that means a false claim to title to property, or the claim to a title is invalid; slander of title.

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JACTIVUS

Lost by default; tossed away. Cowell.

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JACTURA

In the civil law. A throwing of goods overboard in a storm; jettison. Loss from such a cause. Calvin.

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JACTUS

A throwing goods overboard to lighten or save tlie vessel, in which case the goods so sacrificed are a proper subject for general average. Dig. 14, 2, “de lege Illiodia de Jactu.” And see Barnard v. Adams, 10 IIow. 303, 13 L. Ed. 417.

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JAIL

A gaol; a prison; a building designated by law, or regularly used, for the confinement of persons held in lawful custody. State v. Bryan, 89 N. C. 034. See GAOL.

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JAIL DELIVERY

See GAOL.

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JAIL LIBERTIES

See GAOL.

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JAIL-HOUSE LAWYER

term given to a prisoner who studies law while he is in jail so he can help himself and other inmates.

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JAILBREAK

the term used to describe an escape from jail that is accompanied by violence and force.

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JAILER

A keeper or warden of a prison or jail.

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JAMBEAUX

In old English and feudal law. Leg-armor. Blount.

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JAMMA, JUMMA

In Hindu law. Total amount; collection; assembly. The total of a territorial assignment.

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JAMMABUNDY, JUMMABUNDY

In Hindu law. A written schedule of the whole of an assessment.

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