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INADMISSIBLE

That which, under the established rules of law, cannot be admittedor received: e. g., parol evidence to contradict a written contract.

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INADMISSIBLE EVIDENCE

the term given to evidence that is unable to be used in court.

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INADVERTENCE

Heedlessness; lack of attention; failure of a person to pay carefuland prudent attention to the progress of a negotiation or a proceeding in court bywhich his rights may be affected. Used chiefly in statutory enumerations of the groundson which a judgment or decree may be vacated or set aside; as, "mistake, Inadvertence,surprise, or excusable neglect." See Skinner v. Terry, 107 N. C. 103, 12 S. E.118; Davis v. Steuben School Tp

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INALIENABLE

Not subject to alienation ; the characteristic of those things whichcannot be bought or sold or transferred from one person to another, such as rivers andpublic highways, and certain personal rights; e. g., liberty.

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INALIENABLE RIGHTS

the term given to the fundamental rights accorded to all people.

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INAUGURATION

The act of installing or inducting into office with formal ceremonies,as the coronation of a sovereign, the inauguration of a president or governor,or the consecration of a prelate.

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INBLAURA

In old records. Profit or product of ground. Cowell.

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INBOARD

In maritime law, and particularly with reference to the stowage of cargo,this term is contrasted with "outboard." It does not necessarily mean under deck, but isapplied to a cargo so piled or stowed that it does not project over the "board" (side orrail) of the vessel. See Allen v. St. Louis Ins. Co., 46 N. Y. Super. Ct. 181.

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INBORH

In Saxon law. A security, pledge, or hypotheca, consisting of the chattelsof a person unable to obtain a personal "borg," or surety.

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INBOUND COMMON

An uninclosed common, marked out, however, by boundaries.

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INCAPACITATED

This term means that a person cannot perform their usual functions or duties due to a mental or physical disability.

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INCAPACITY

Want of capacity; want of power or ability to take or dispose; want oflegal ability to act. Ellicott v. Ellieott, 90 Md. 321, 45 Atl. 183, 48 L. R. A. 58: Drews'Appeal. 58 N. H. 320; Appeal of Cleveland, 72 Conn. 340, 44 Atl. 470; In re Blinn, 99Cal. 210. 33 Pac. 841.

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INCAPACITY PARTIAL

This means the partial inability to be able to do one's duties.

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INCAPACITY TOTAL

This term applies to the complete inability to work at any sort of job.

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INCARCERATE

the term that describes confining a person to prison or jail.

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INCARCERATION

Imprisonment; confinement in a jail or penitentiary. This term isseldom used in law, though found occasionally in statutes, (Rev. St. Okl. 1903,

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INCASTELLARE

To make a building serve ns a castle. Jacob.

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INCAUSTUM, or ENCAUSTUM

Ink. Fleta, 1. 2, c. 27,

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INCENDIARY

A house-burner; one guilty of arson; one who maliciously and willfullysets another person's building on fire.Incendinm sere alieno non exuit debitor em. Cod. 4, 2, 11. A fire does not release a debtor from his debt.

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INCENTIVE COMPENSATION

This term applies to payments in excess of agreed wages, a bonus and profit sharing as an incentive for a good performance.

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