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IDEO

Lat Therefore. Calvin.

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IDEO CONSIDER ATUM EST

Lat. Therefore it is considered. These were the words used at the beginning of the entry ofjudgment in an action, when the forms were in I/atin. They are also used as a name forthat portion of the record.

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IDES

A division of time among the Romans. In March, May, July, and October, theIdes were on the 15th of the month ; in the remaining months, on the 13th. Thismethod of reckoning is still retained in the chancery of Rome, and in the calendar of thebreviary. Wharton.

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IDIOCHIRA

Gracco-Lat. In the civil law. An instrument privately executed, asdistinguished from such as were executed before a public officer. Cod. 8, 18, 11; Calvin.

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IDIOCY

See INSANITY.

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IDIOT

A person who has been without understanding from his nativity, and whomthe law, therefore, presumes never likely to attain any. Shelf. Lun. 2. See INSANITY.

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IDIOTA

In the civil law. An unlearned, illiterate, or simple person. Calvin. A privateman; one not in office. In common law. An idiot or fool.

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IDIOTA INQUIRENDO, WRIT DE

This Is the name of an old writ which directs the sheriff to inquire whether a man be anidiot or not. The inquisition is to be made by a jury of twelve men. Fitzh. Nat Brev. 232.And, if the man were found an Idiot, the profits of his lands and the custody of hisperson might be granted by the king to any subject who had interest enough to obtain them. 1 Bl. Comm. 303.

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IDONEUM SE FACERE; IDONEARESE

To purge one's self by oath of a crime of which one is accused.

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IDONEUS

Lat. In the civil and common law. Sufficient; competent; fit or proper;responsible; unimpeachable. Ido- ncus homo, a responsible or solvent person; a goodand lawful man. Sufficient; adequate ; satisfactory. Idonea cautio, sufficient security.

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IDONIETAS

In old English law. Ability or fitness, (of a parson.) Artie. Cleri, c. 13.

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IEDES

Lat. In the civil law. A house, dwelling, place of habitation, whether in the city or country. Dig. 30, 41, 5. In the country everything upon the surface of the soil passed under the term "cedes." Du Cange; Calvin.

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IEDIFICATUM SOLO SOLO CEDIT

What is built upon land belongs to or goes with land. Broom, Max. 172; Co. Litt. 4a.

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IEDILITUM EDICTUM

In the Roman law. The iEdilitian Edict; an edict providing remedies for frauds in sales, the execution of which belonged to the curule aediles. Dig. 21, 1. See Cod. 4, 58.

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IEGROTO

Lat. Being sick or indisposed. A term used in some of the older reports. "Holt wgroto." 11 Mod. 179.

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IEQUITAS EST PERFECTA QUSEDAM RATIO QUAE JUS SCRIPTUIN INTERPRETATUR ET EMEN- DAT; NULLA SCRIPTURA COMPREHENSA, SCD SOLUM IN VERA RATIONE CONSISTENS

Equity is a certain perfect reason, which interprets and amends the written law, comprehended in no writing, but consisting in right reason alone. Co. Litt 246.

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IEQUITAS UXORIBUS, LIBERIS, CREDITORIBUS MAXIME FAVET

Equity favors wives and children, creditors most of all.

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IETAS PCRFECTA

Complete age ; full age ; the age of twenty-live. Dig. 4, 4, 32; Id. 22, 3, 25, 1.

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IETAS PUBERTATI JIROXIMA

The age next to puberty; the last half of the period of childhood. (.pucritia,) extending from ten years and a half to fourteen. Inst. 3, 20, 9; 4 Bl. Comm. 22.

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IF

In deeds and wills, this word, as a rule, implies a condition precedent, unless itbe controlled by other words. 2 Crabb, Real Prop. p. 809,

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