Archive | H RSS feed for this section

H

This letter, as an abbreviation, stands for Henry (a king of that name) in tbe citationof English statutes. In the Year Books, it is used as an abbreviation for Hilary term.In tax assessments and other such official records, “h” may be used as an abbreviationfor “house,” and the courts will so understand it. Alden v. Newark, 36 N. J. Law, 288;Parker v. Elizabeth, 39 N. J. Law, 693.H. A. An abbreviation for hoc anno, this year, in this year.H. B. An abbreviation for house bill, f. e., a bill in the house of representatives, asdistinguished from a senate bill.H. C. An abbreviation for house of commons, or for habeas corpus.H. L. An abbreviation for house of lords.H. R. An abbreviation for house of representatives.H. T. An abbreviation for hoc titulo, this title, under this title; used in references to books.H. V. An abbreviation for hoc verbo or hac voce, this word, under this word; used inreferences to dictionaries and other works alphabetically arranged.

Comments are closed

H-1B VISA

A visa that the US uses to let foreign parties to work here temporarily. An employer must sponser them and the job must be in one area by law. They can stay 6 years max and have a bachelors degree in the field in question.

Comments are closed

H-BEAM

A hot rolled steel beam.It has a h shaped cross section used in piling and retaining walls.

Comments are closed

HABACrUM

In old English law. A race of horses aud mares kept for breed; a stud. Spelman.

Comments are closed

HABE, or HAVE

Lat. A form of the salutatory expression “Ave,” (hail,) in the titles ofthe constitutions of the Theodosian and Justinianean Codes. Calvin; Spelman.

Comments are closed

HABEAS CORPORA JURATORUM

A writ commanding the sheriff to bring up the persons of jurors, and. if need were, todistrain them of their lands and goods, in order to insure or compel their attendance incourt on the day of trial of a cause. It issued from the Common Pleas, and served thesame purpose as a distringas juratorcs in the King’s Bench. It was abolished by the C.L. P. Act, 1852,

Comments are closed

HABEAS CORPUS

Lat. (You have the body.) The name given to a variety of writs,(of which these were anciently the emphatic words,) having for their object to bring aparty before a court or judge. In common usage, and whenever these words are usedalone, they are understood to mean the habeas corpus ad subjiciendum, (see infra.)

Comments are closed

HABENDUM

Lat. In conveyancing. The clause usually following the granting part ofthe premises of a deed, which defines the extent of the ownership In the tiling grantedto be held and enjoyed by the grantee. 3 Washb. Real Prop. 437; New York Indians v.U. S., 170 U. S. 1, 18 Sup. Ct. 531, 42 L. Ed. 927; Clapp v. Byrnes, 3 App. Div. 284, 38N. Y. Supp. 1063; Miller v. Graham,47 S. C. 288, 25 S. E. 1G5; Hart r. Gardner, 74 Miss. 153, 20 South. S77.

Comments are closed

HABENDUM CLAUSE

the name given to a clause in a deed that describes the estate that is to be granted.

Comments are closed

HABENTES HOMINES

In old English law. Rich men; literally, having men. The samewith fcesting-men, (q. v.) Cowell.

Comments are closed

HABENTIA

Riches. Mon. Angl. t 1, 100.

Comments are closed

HABERE

Lat. In the civil law. To have. Sometimes distinguished from terwrc, (tohold,) and possidere, (to possess;) habere referring to the right, tenere to the fact, andpossidere to both. Calvin.

Comments are closed

HABERE FACIAS POSSESSIONEM

Lat. That you cause to have possession. The name of the process commonly resorted toby the successful party in an action of ejectment, for the purpose of being placed bythe sheriff in the actual possession of the land recovered. It is commonly termed simply”habere facias,” or “hab. fa.”

Comments are closed

HABERE FACIAS SEISINAM

L. Lat. That you cause to have seisin. The writ ofexecution in real actions, directing the sheriff to cause the demandant to have seisin ofthe lands recovered. It was the proper process for giving seisin of a freehold, as distinguishedfrom a chattel interest in lands.

Comments are closed

HABERE FACIAS VISUM

Lat. That you cause to have a view. A writ to cause thesheriff to take a view of lauds or tenements.

Comments are closed

HABERE LICERE

Lat. In Roman law. To allow [one] to have [possession.] Thisphrase denoted the duty of the seller of property to allow the purchaser to have thepossession and enjoyment. For a breach of this duty, an actio ex empto might be maintained.

Comments are closed

HABERJECTS

A cloth of a mixed color. Magna Charta, c. 26.

Comments are closed

HABETO TIB I RES TUAS

Lat Have or take your effects to yourself. One of the oldRoman forms of divorcing a wife. Calvin.

Comments are closed

HABILIS

Lat. Fit; suitable; active; useful, (of a servant.) Proved; authentic, (of Bookof Saints.) Fixed; stable, (of authority of the king.) Du Cange.

Comments are closed

HABIT

A disposition or condition of the body or mind acquired by custom or a usualrepetition of the same act or function. Knickerbocker L. Ins. Co. v. Foley, 105 U. S. 354,26 L. Ed. 1055 ; Conner v. Citizens’ St. R. Co., 146 Ind. 430, 45 N. E. 662; State v. Skillicorn,104 Iowa, 97, 73 N. W. 503; State v. Robinson, 111 Ala. 4S2, 20 South. 30.

Comments are closed